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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (364)

Has China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) usurped Brics as China’s flagship forum? And if so, what does this mean for future Brics co-operation? These are key questions leaders Michel Temer (Brazil), Vladimir Putin (Russia), Narendra Modi (India) and Jacob Zuma have had to consider at the meeting with their heads-of-state counterpart, China’s Xi Jinping, at the group’s annual summit in Xiamen, China.
Global headlines in the run-up to the 9th BRICS summit were dominated by the North Korean missile crisis and the stand-off in Doklam, high in the Himalayas, in Bhutan. The former had a direct bearing on the interests of Russia and China, as they share a border with North Korea, but positioned them on the same side in calling for a de-escalation in tensions between the US and North Korea. In the case of the latter though, it pitted two BRICS members, India and China, against each other.
Although the theme of the 9th BRICS Summit is “A Stronger Partnership for a Brighter Future”, there is likely to be some underlying tension among the five member states when they meet in Xiamen, East China’s Xiamen province, from Sept 3 to 5.
SAIIA invites members of the media to our special briefing on the 9th BRICS Summit.
South Africa has made strides over the last 20 years to promote economic growth and address unemployment, inequality and poverty. Facilitating greater trade, investment and industrialisation is a key part of this strategy.
Volume 24.1 of the South African Journal of International Affairs sports a new cover with the updated SAIIA logo.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
SAIIA Research Report No 24, November 2016 Download - English Foreign Policy Programme As the global development landscape continues to evolve, new and emerging actors – countries transitioning from being aid recipients to aid providers – are becoming increasingly visible on the global scene. Although the approaches, interests and resources of emerging donors are far from uniform, their increasing presence in global development – particularly in fragile and conflict-affected settings – could create new ways of thinking about foreign aid and contribute to more horizontal, equitable and efficient practices. The rise of these donors also poses challenges: their compliance with…
The commanding position that the BRICS economies once held in the post-global financial crises era legitimised their claims for more equitable global governance institutions. Equally, they believed that the development challenges they shared could be addressed through a collective voice in international forums on the back of their strong economic performances.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 35, September 2016
Africa’s infrastructure financing deficit, estimated to be $100 billion a year, remains persistently large. The resulting lack of investment in energy, transport and water infrastructure on the continent presents a significant barrier to economic growth and development.
Nearly nine months ago the third India-Africa Forum Summit, and the first that included all African states, was held with much fanfare in Delhi. There, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a range of measures, including extending lines of credit to African nations of up to $10 billion over the next five years, additional grant assistance of $600 million, and a commitment to help train more African peacekeepers in Africa and India.
SAIIA today held a diplomatic briefing, addressed by Elizabeth Sidiropoulos and Cyril Prinsloo, on 'The Geopolitics of the 'new normal': South Africa in the BRICS 5 years on.'
On 18 March 2016, SAIIA and the Embassy of Japan cordially hosted two briefings, on 'The New Development Bank and its place in the Development Finance Sector in Africa: Perspectives,' and 'The potential for the development of regional value chains in the Automotive Sector in SADC: Lessons from the ASEAN Experience.'
The 2014 Summit of the BRICS grouping in Fortaleza saw the launch of the New Development Bank, a new international development finance institution. The Bank’s purpose is to: ‘mobilise resources for infrastructure and sustainable development projects in BRICS and other emerging economies and developing countries, complementing the existing efforts of multilateral and regional financial institutions for global growth and development’.
A special issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs, entitled ‘South Africa’s world: Perspectives on diplomacy, international political economy and international law’, is now available online (Volume 22.4).
Three years of international research in Europe and the BICS countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) has resulted in a new book, 'Challenges of European External Energy Governance with Emerging Powers'. The chapter 'South Africa-EU energy governance: tales of path dependency, regional power, and decarbonisation' was authored by SAIIA Senior Researcher, Dr Agathe Maupin.
A webcast is available of the special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience,' held on 3 December 2015 by SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP).
On 3 December 2015, SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP) hosted a special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience.'
The upcoming Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) summit in South Africa, the sixth gathering since 2000 and only the second to be held at heads of state level, comes at a time of unprecedented Chinese activism across the globe.
In the context of a ‘normalising’ Chinese economy, that seeks to move from a manufacturing-centred economy to one driven by consumption and services, there are obviously concerns about the impact on Africa through a decrease in commodity exports (and income) to China. Yet such shifts also signal opportunity and perhaps changes in China’s approach towards the continent, to include ‘softer’ issues - like closer public interaction.
Fifteen years after its inception, the sixth Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) will be held in Johannesburg on December 4-5 under the theme, ‘Africa-China Progressing Together: Win-Win Cooperation for Common Development’. Launched in October 2000 in Beijing as a tri-annual collective dialogue platform for co-operation between China and Africa, FOCAC is a signal of the dynamic and expanding nature of China-Africa relations. 
SAIIA invites members of the media to our special briefing on the sixth Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), 'FOCAC VI : More of the same or signs of change?' on 19 November 2015.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 223, October 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 29, November 2015
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