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Latin America and the Caribbean (119)

The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the Global Economic Governance Africa (GEGA) Programme invite you to a conference on Finance and Development: Experiences in south-south collaboration from Africa, Asia and Latin America
From 29 November to 1 December 2016, experts from Brazil, China, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mexico, South Africa, Turkey, Uganda, and Zimbabwe gathered in Nairobi at the second High Level Meeting (HLM2) of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC). There, they shared with the broader international development community the work produced on south-south co-operation and provide Southern perspectives on the current global debates. At this meeting, NeST Africa and its various global partners hosted a series of side-events, workshops, amphitheatre and break-out sessions on various topics related to South-South co-operation and its role in the international development landscape.
In March 2016 President Barak Obama undertook a historic visit to Cuba, becoming the first American president to visit the island in 88 years. He has held talks with President Raul Castro in Havana. While diplomatic ties have been restored between the two countries, many issues remain unresolved.
In March 2015 a group of 25 prominent academics and development co-operation experts from the global South gathered in Midrand, South Africa to discuss a common analytical framework for South−South co-operation.
The rise of so-called ‘emerging economies’ - such as Brazil, India and China - has been marked by their growing contribution to developmental issues, regionally and globally. This provision of assistance to the developing world by the developing world is known as South-South Cooperation (SSC).
While the BRICS’ initial focus when it was established in 2009 was on improving global economic governance in response to the 2008 financial crisis, over the last seven years BRICS co-operation and dialogue has moved into politico-security areas.  
Cuba has officially become the first country in the world to eliminate the transmission of HIV and syphilis from mother to child. Margaret Chan, director-general for the World Health Organisation (WHO), described the small Caribbean island’s achievement as 'one of the greatest public health achievements possible.'
SAIIA today hosted the Korean Foreign Ministry, to discuss the outcomes of the Fifth MIKTA (Mexico, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Turkey and Australia) Foreign Ministers’ Meeting held in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, on 22 May 2015.
A new set of papers has just been released, looking at BRICS and Development Finance Institutions.
The South African Institute of International Affairs in collaboration with Oxfam hosted the first technical workshop of the Network of Southern Think-Tanks (NeST) from 2 to 5 March 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa.
In July 2014, the BRICS grouping (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), announced the creation of a new, US$100 billion New Development Bank to lend money to developing nations for investments. There is much speculation about the role the Bank might play, and the motivations of the BRICS members in establishing it.
On 24 November 2014, the Graduate School of Business at the University of Cape Town and the South African Institute of International Affairs, hosted a conference on 'Development Banks of the Developing World: Regional Roles, Governance and Sustainability.'
After five years of introspection and institution building, the sixth BRICS summit offers an opportunity for the group to focus on its relations with the rest of the world. Relations with the Group of 7 (G-7) are particularly contentious. Russia's exclusion from the G-8 following the crisis in Crimea has moved the BRICS to the centre stage in Russian foreign policy thinking, and risks pulling the group onto an opposition footing with the West.
The BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) were brought together by their investment returns and growth potential, but for the group to act they must find some common purpose.
Wednesday, 09 July 2014

BRICS 2014 Summit

As the BRICS meet in Fortaleza, Brazil from 14-16 July 2014, attention is once again on the group’s efforts to establish two new financial institutions: the New Development Bank and the Contingent Reserve Arrangement. Negotiations are underway on both and, while it remains uncertain that they will be officially launched in Fortaleza, substantial progress is expected to be announced at the summit.
In advance of the sixth annual BRICS Heads of State Summit, to be held in Fortaleza, Brazil from 14-16 July 2014, SAIIA has compiled an engaging range of new materials about the grouping's past, present and future.
Tuesday, 08 July 2014

BRICS Media Briefing 2014

The South African Institute of International Affairs and the Global Economic Governance Africa (GEG-Africa) Project invited members of the press to a special media briefing on "BRICS: from Durban to Fortaleza, what to expect," on 8 July 2014.
In advance of the 2014 the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa (BRICS) Summit, an update is now available for the highly popular online resource 'BRICS and the New World Order: A Beginners Guide', produced by SAIIA and CUTS International.
New research on the trade policies of each of the BRICS countries, using the World Trade Organization (WTO) as a frame of reference, is now available for the first time in English.
Since China hosted the 2008 Beijing Olympics there has been a marked increase in the active bidding and subsequent hosting of global mega-events by countries considered ‘rising’ in international affairs. In 2010 the Commonwealth Games was hosted in India, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in China. Fast forward to 2014 and Russia held the Sochi Winter Olympics, while Brazil is set to host the upcomming 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympic Games.
On 12-13 May, SAIIA, the Ford Foundation and the Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre (NOREF), organised a public panel and an experts’ seminar on ‘Human Rights, Emerging Powers and International Governance: Civil Society Actors and Transnational Advocacy in the 21st Century’.
2013 was a difficult year for the five BRICS countries. China and Brazil faced slowing growth, South Africa and India were hit by currency instability, and concern over Russia’s governance deepened (before recent events in the Ukraine pitched them into all-out crisis). As doubts have mounted, investors have increasingly turned back to traditional investment destinations like the United States and Europe, as well as to new formations like the MINTs (Mexico, India, Nigeria and Turkey).
As the sixth BRICS head of state summit approaches, it is clear that the grouping’s agenda is far from static. The BRICS Policy Center (BPC) and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) hosted a seminar to address some of the inter-BRICS and intra-BRICS dynamics relevant to the consolidation of the grouping as a whole.
This year’s Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa (BRICS) Summit will be held in July in Fortaleza, Brazil. Experts from the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) will be in Brazil from Wednesday 12 March 2014 for a number of events related to the upcoming Summit.
In little over a decade Brazil has orbited from the periphery to the core of the international system. In 2014, the year that Brazil is to host the World Cup and the Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa (BRICS) summit, three new SAIIA publications provide insights into this rising power.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 170, December 2014
How effective are the BRICS in inspiring confidence in their public diplomacy? This question lies at the heart of their soft power.
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