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Governance of Africa’s Resources

Based in Cape Town, GARP provides advisory and research support to governments and other stakeholders on governing Africa’s natural resources to maximise their equitable and sustainable development contributions. Regular field research, policy convening and dialogue activities are led by GARP experts in the three focal areas of mining and development; energy and the green economy; and the governance of ecosystems and commons resources (including fisheries and forestry).

Increasingly acknowledged as an influential African voice on resource governance, the programme works closely with local, regional and other international partners, including through the SAIIA Change-Makers forum and the Governance of Africa’s Resources Research Network (GARN). Co-ordinated by GARP, the network facilitates capacity-building, knowledge-sharing and the up-scaling of research outputs beyond the respective national levels.

View a playlist of videos related to this programme on YouTube. Contact the programme on resourcegov[@]saiia.org.za.

As the dust settles on Kenya’s divisive repeat elections, there is an understandable urge to move forward, to return to a sense of normalcy. Kenya is, after all, the most vibrant economy in the East African region and a bulwark against instability issuing from fragile neighbours.
The COP23 summit takes place amid complex global geopolitical dynamics, with President Donald Trump having announced the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement in June. The US is currently the world’s second largest producer of carbon emissions after China and its abdication makes this and other international negotiations more challenging. Entrenched national interests have exacerbated tensions.
SAIIA Policy Briefing, November 2017
The high seas are in trouble. Overfishing, deep seabed mining, oil rigs, climate change, bioprospecting and increased tourism are just some of the threats facing this massive body of water that makes up 70% of our ocean space and 40% of the earth’s surface.
During a state visit to India in 1995 then president of South Africa Nelson Mandela suggested closer ties between the nations of the Indian Ocean rim.
On the eve of the 2017 Johannesburg Mining Indaba, the Chamber of Mines declined an invitation to the opening gala dinner — part of continuing conflict between the state and the industry over the controversial new Mining Charter.
South Africa’s recent reversal of a ban on trade in rhinoceros horn has invigorated support for commercial farming of the product. But breeders' argument that a legal market will protect wild populations ignores how the illicit trade in wildlife products actually functions.
João Lourenço has become Angola’s first new president in 38 years. Dr Alex Vines of Chatham House explains why a stable DRC is a top priority for the new leader: A stable and predictable Congo is Luanda’s most important international objective.
Dr Alex Vines of Chatham House writes that Angola’s new President João Lourenço needs to quickly focus on the country’s oil and gas future to attract fresh investment: The country should introduce credible policies to diversify its economy, but in the short term, the new president has no choice but to focus on Angola’s economic lifeblood.
Elephants in the wild are under serious threat: Save the Elephants estimates that 100,000 elephants were killed for their ivory in Africa between 2010 and 2012.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 269, August 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 52, July 2017
A South African court has granted the world’s largest rhino breeder a permit to sell his stockpile of rhino horn to local buyers.
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In a time of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which South Africa has committed to, all sectors and stakeholders are required to participate, incorporate and implement the SDGs into their operations. The mining sector is an important sector that can either facilitate or hinder progress. While the mining sector can promise economic development, job opportunities, business development, increased revenues and infrastructure linkages, it also has the potential to impact negatively on the SDGs through environmental degradation, displacement of populations, worsening economic and social inequality, gender-based violence, corruption, health and human rights degradation.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 264, July 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 50, July 2017
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 259, June 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 48, July 2017
It’s no exaggeration to say that African elephants are in grave danger. The forest elephant, native to Central Africa, is on the edge of extinction. Savanna elephants, in southern Africa, are being poached at a rate of roughly 27,000 a year.
This week government representatives and a range of other stakeholders will be meeting at the United Nations headquarters in New York for the Ocean Conference, coinciding with World Oceans Day on June 8.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 46, May 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 44, May 2017
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