Select a language for instant Google Translation

youthblogtext2
 
youthblogtext2
Tuesday, 10 January 2017

Youth Programmes Intern

SAIIA has grown its Youth Development Programme substantially over recent years. The outreach programme fosters awareness of international relations and stimulates young South Africans to engage with such issues, thereby cultivating future leaders.
(0 votes)

SAIIA Youth Policy Committee members Phiwayinkosi Mungwe, Janet Kachinga and Ditebogo Lebea have traveled to Morocco for this year's United Nations Climate Change Conference, otherwise known as COP22. From Morocco and from Johannesburg, young people who have been following these issues for many years will be writing about the direction the negotiations are taking.

(0 votes)

SAIIA Youth Policy Committee members Luanda Mpungose and Annabel Fenton are in Istanbul for the first ever World Humanitarian Summit. They are providing daily updates on the main developments at the Summit, from their perspective as young South Africans.

(0 votes)

Youth Policy Committee members Pule Nkopane and Franci van Rhyn are currently at the 2016 United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC) Youth Forum at the UN headquarters in New York. This year’s forum focuses on ‘Youth Taking Action to Implement the 2030 Agenda’, and Franci and Pule will be sharing daily updates here as young South Africans.

(0 votes)

Over the two weeks of this year's United Nations Climate Change Conference, otherwise known as COP21, SAIIA youth participants will be following the debates and decisions of world representatives. From Paris and from Johannesburg, we will sending daily updates and explaining how young people who have been following these issues for many years feel about the direction the negotiations are taking.

(0 votes)

This year, SAIIA Youth Policy Committee member Morategi Kale will be travelling to Paris to participate in the largest global conference on climate change, COP21. She will be blogging about her experiences here. In the run-up to the conference, we asked Morategi to tell us a bit about herself.

(0 votes)
In the fourth in a series of blogs from members of SAIIA's Youth Policy Committee, Teboho Tenyane looks at the Sustainable Development Goals which focuses on education.

Coming from a public school in Soweto, the only world we knew was the school. We didn’t have any exposure to the outside world and while some opportunities we were given, such as programmes for job preparedness, we didn’t really understand what true education was.

Goal 2 of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) focused on achieving universal primary education, and it is important for our government, civil society and the private sector to really address the issues we face in our educational system. While Goal 2 of the MDGs was important, it had no clear indicators of what it really intended to do, other than just enrol learners.
(0 votes)

In the third in a series of blogs from members of SAIIA's Youth Policy Committee, Janet Kachinga looks at the Sustainable Development Goal which focuses on hunger.

One of the challenges the world faces today, and what is possibly our biggest failure as a people, is ending world hunger. Currently 795 million people in the world are undernourished according to a 2015 report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation. It is shocking and saddening that at in a world with magnitudes of accomplishments, we have failed to ensure that everyone has the most fundamental requirement for survival.

Sustainable Development Goal 2, ‘End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture’, aims to tackle this challenge, but how can this multi-dimensional issue be solved- what will it take?

(0 votes)

In the second in a series of blogs from members of SAIIA's Youth Policy Committee, Annabel Fenton looks at the Sustainable Development Goal which focuses on gender.

As I read the draft document containing the proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), I was sitting in a bustling coffee shop in Braamfontein, the heart of Johannesburg. I read the targets relating to Goal 5 on gender and nodded my head. It was as I had expected – equal wages, safety for women, less abusive practices.

These are not new, mind-blowing targets. We have been fighting for the same things, more or less, since the suffragette movement that started during World War II. Yes, it is morphing and becoming more culturally-orientated, especially with African feminist movements, but gender equality and zero discrimination is what we’ve been speaking about for years. This worried me for a while because I had no new response to it all, because I have responded to these targets repeatedly since I first became involved with advocacy.

(0 votes)
In the first in a series of blogs from members of SAIIA's Youth Policy Committee, Maryam Elgoni looks at the Sustainable Development Goals which focus on conflict and violence.

The idea of conflict and violence has become exclusively synonymous with ideas of warfare, but the sad reality is that conflict and violence surround us daily and plague our lives.

A young South African woman who fears being sexually abused if she uses public transport due to her ‘revealing’ clothes is a victim of conflict and violence. Little girls in Pakistan or Nigeria who wish to get an education, but instead get shot at, beaten and raped are victims of conflict and violence. Young Muslim men from Sudan, Turkey, Syria and even South Africa who have been abducted and forced to join ISIS are victims of conflict and violence. Palestinian and Israeli civilians who are caught in the crossfire of religious and political tensions are victims of conflict and violence.