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Brazil 'is the country of the future and always will be'. Attributed to Stefan Zweig, an Austrian novelist who emigrated to Brazil in 1941, this quote could be adapted to Nigeria, which recently hosted the World Economic Forum’s (WEF’s) Africa Summit in Abuja.
With a persistently high unemployment rate, building an economy that provides opportunities for all is extremely important to all the political parties contesting the 2014 South African general election.
A new project, 'A Review of South Africa’s Trade Strategy in Light of Global Developments', has been established by SAIIA with support from the British High Commission. It proposes significant adjustments to current South African trade strategy stances, particularly in light of the impasse at the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the resulting development of ‘mega-regional agreements’ outside the WTO system. Below are all of the materials created by the project.
Representatives of 54 African and 28 European States, including over 30 heads of state, will meet in Brussels on 2 and 3 April for the fourth EU-Africa Summit. The meeting has a broad-ranging agenda under the title “Investing in People, Prosperity and Peace”.
SAIIA hosted a Public Forum on 'A Review of South Africa’s Trade Strategy in Light of Global Developments', 25 March 2014, in conjunction with the British High Commission and the New Zealand High Commission.
The University of Pretoria, Politics Department and the South African Institute of International Affairs are co-hosting a roundtable on 19 February 2014, on Trade And Misaligned Currencies: Towards A WTO Solution For Predatory Government Interventions?
SAIIA and the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM) have released a new set of short case studies that shed light on regional integration in Southern Africa - where it has worked well, where new thinking is underway, and what and who can drive concrete regional cooperation.
TIPS and SAIIA hosted a Speaker’s Meeting addressed by Dr. Witney Schneidman, Senior International Advisor for Africa, Covington & Burling LLP & Nonresident Senior Fellow, Africa Growth Initiative, Brookings. He spoke on 'The Renewal of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the Prospects for US-South African Trade Relations'.
The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) has formed the bedrock of trade between the US and African countries since it entered into force in 2000. Under AGOA, South Africa and other African countries enjoy duty free access to the US market. This access has helped make the United States the second biggest market for South African goods, and the largest market for key manufacturing sectors, such as the motor industry.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 79, December 2013
Go to any conference in the world and say ‘Doha Development Agenda’, and the room is likely to empty. But not in China. Recently I was impressed with the degree of interest amongst China’s trade policy elite in the future of the World Trade Organization (WTO), and the global trading system of which it is a part.
On 4 December 2013, SAIIA will host a session on the sidelines of the 9th World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference, on the topic  "BRICS and the Multilateral Trading System." This session is part of the Bali Trade and Development Symposium, which will take place from 3-5 December.
Three years ago this author reflected on how the World Trade Organisation (WTO) ought to adapt and evolve in order to stay relevant. The focus was on the changes the multilateral trading system has faced over the years from the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) to the WTO we know today. In advance of the all-important 9th WTO Ministerial Conference held in Bali, Indonesia from 3 to 6 December 2013, much of that thinking remains relevant and the issues raised are still at the core of the existential crisis that the WTO finds itself in.
The South African Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, gave the keynote address at the Second Annual African G-20 Conference, on the theme “The G-20 and Africa’s Economic Growth and Transformation”. The conference on 11 November 2013 was hosted by the South African Institute of International Affairs and the University of Pretoria, as part of their Global Economic Governance Africa Project. This project seeks to ensure that African interests are understood and effectively represented in the various global forums that debate and set rules for global economic governance.
The recent visit of South Africa’s Trade and Industry Minister, Rob Davies, to the United States to lobby for the renewal of the African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA) highlights the need for South Africans to be fully engaged with this process, as its outcome will ultimately impact their economic welfare. Mfundo Hlatshwayo, a Research Associate with SAIIA's Economic Diplomacy Programme, spoke to Polity about AGOA and its implications for South Africa and the continent. Click on the video above to watch. Related Resources Read a review of the recent AGOA event hosted by SAIIA and TIPS, The African Growth and…
Mozambique has been one of the ten fastest growing economies in the world from 2001-2010 and is forecast to continue its rapid growth trajectory. In 2014 Mozambique will commemorate 20 years of democracy and, given the substantial changes that have taken place in recent years, this provides a timely juncture to discuss emerging challenges and future perspectives on Mozambique, as well as the country’s role in the SADC region.
A full agenda of dialogues with US Congress, US business and the US administration has been prepared for South Africa’s Trade and Industry Minister, Rob Davies, as his department starts South Africa’s lobbying effort for the seamless renewal of the African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA). Minister Davies and his senior aides travelled to the US last week to cajole the US congress and other thought leaders of the importance of US–Africa economic relations, as well as to argue South Africa’s case for an unfettered renewal of AGOA.  
South Africans may not appreciate that a diplomatic Bilateral Forum between South Africa and the United Kingdom is something unusual for the British. Pretoria has many similar arrangements and it can be difficult to keep track of them all, but for the United Kingdom it is rare and in Africa, it occurs only with South Africa.
The first joint workshop between TIPS and The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) on the African Growth and Opportunities Act (AGOA) took place at the IDC on 17 September 2013. This was timed to coincide with the lobbying visit by a South African government and business delegation to Washington led by Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies.
In this podcast, Jakkie Cilliers, Executive Director of the Institute for Security Studies looks at South Africa's economic plans through his research on the country's draft National Development Plan. He speaks to SAIIA's Chief Executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, about his findings and what it reveals about the future of SA's economic strategy.   
It is not surprising that African countries bordering the Indian Ocean see themselves as ‘gateways’ or entry points to the continent. The coastal towns and communities of South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique have for centuries had complex and dynamic cultural and economic links with their counterparts along the Indian Ocean Rim. Today, with the global liberalisation of trade and investment, these countries increasingly seek to position themselves between Africa’s interior and the broader world, and particularly the fast-growing economies in Asia.
Group of 20 (G-20) leaders gather in St Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday 5 September. Global crisis is in the air again, this time centred on emerging markets; in principle, this is a circumstance that is tailor-made for this forum. What are the prospects for success at the G-20 — and with what implications for South Africa?