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SAIIA Policy Briefing No 118, December 2014
It is hoped that African countries will soon be signing a new free trade agreement that will take the continent one step closer to its goal of economic development.
Botswana possesses an estimated 212 billion tonnes of coal, much of which is thermal quality and unsuitable for export. Under a conservative set of assumptions, however, the country could export roughly 72 million tonnes a year at peak production. But climate change concerns - and the impact of international climate change agreements to limit carbon emissions - may curtail the availability of future export markets.
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs (Volume 21.3) is now available online, featuring articles on BRICS co-operation across the South Atlantic, collaboration by BRICS corporates in Africa, the nuclear security discourse, the question of Islamic Nationalism in Al Shabaab, ANC foreign policymaking under Mbeki and the question of conflict-free diamonds under the Kimberly process.
In 2011, the SADC Secretariat in collaboration with Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) initiated a research and dialogue project to identify the most significant constraints to doing business in the SADC region. The idea was to make these more tangible – beyond the desk research stage, by conducting firm-level case studies on the identified constraints.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, the University of Pretoria and the US Embassy in Pretoria, South Africa will be holding a discussion with Catherine A. Novelli, United States Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment. This event is by invite only.  
On 12 November 2014, Oxfam South Africa and the Global Economic Governance Africa project, a joint initiative by SAIIA and the University of Pretoria, held a Media Briefing and panel discussion on the upcoming G-20 Summit. A video of the briefing is now online.
Ahead of ninth annual Summit of the Group of 20 (G-20) nations, to be held in Brisbane from 15- 16 November, SAIIA has made a range of useful materials available. From the facts about the G-20, to the issues likely to arise at the Summit, the experts and resources below can assist journalists, commentators and researchers prepare to follow the event.
Since the establishment of formal diplomatic ties in 1998, relations between South Africa, a leading economy on the African continent, and China, the largest developing country in the world, have grown steadily. Sharing a similar global vision, the two emerging countries are working towards closer strategic co-operation that takes account of the structure of bilateral economic ties, domestic diversity and overlapping interests.
The growth of the private sector is recognised as crucial to unlock economic growth in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). But there are numerous barriers to trade in the region. Supported by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), SAIIA has undertaken research to identify the top 10 barriers to doing business in the SADC region.
South Africa, a leading economy on the African continent, and China, the largest developing country in the world, have forged a unique partnership. Operating at bilateral, continental and multilateral levels, the governments are actively striving to realise the comprehensive strategic partnership envisaged in 2010.
The Institute for International Trade (Australia) and the South African Institute for International Affairs together hosted a one-day workshop on “Aid for Trade Priorities for Africa and the Role of the Private Sector”, 3 October 2014.
A new project, coordinated by SAIIA, is exploring how multilateral trade negotiations can be revitalised to overcome both existing and emerging challenges.
A new project, coordinated by SAIIA, is exploring how multilateral trade negotiations can be revitalised to overcome both existing and emerging challenges.
A new project, coordinated by SAIIA, is exploring how multilateral trade negotiations can be revitalised to overcome both existing and emerging challenges.
A new project, coordinated by SAIIA, is exploring how multilateral trade negotiations can be revitalised to overcome both existing and emerging challenges.
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs (Volume 21.2) is now available online, featuring articles on topics ranging from the post-presidential diplomacy of Thabo Mbeki, to the M23 insurgency in the Democratic Republic of Congo, to greening economic growth in the South.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 198, August 2014
The heads of state and government of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) members are ensconced in the resort town of Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. This is for the annual summit of the regional economic community (17-18 August) that includes countries from as far north as Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).
The US-Africa Leaders’ Summit, 4 to 6 August 2014, is the first such event of its kind and the largest event any US President has held with African heads of state and government. At its core, it is about fostering stronger ties between the US and Africa, and is expected to advance the Obama Administration’s focus on trade and investment in Africa.
This week African leaders have descended on Washington, DC for the first ever US-Africa Leaders Summit. African leaders are expected to arrive with a long list of items to address with President Barack Obama, with the need to expeditiously reauthorise the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) near the top of the list.
On September 30, 2015, the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) will expire. The act provides duty free access to the US, and if it lapses could threaten 62,395 jobs in South Africa alone.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 100, July 2014
The US-Africa Leaders’ Summit takes place from 4 to 6 August, and is the first such event of its kind. The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) has been following developments in US-Africa relations in recent years, and has put together a set of resources to help observers and the media understand the dynamics at play.
In the lead up to the US-Africa Leaders’ Summit, taking place from 4 to 6 August, all eyes are on the future of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). South Africa currently qualifies trade preferences under the Act, along with 38 other African states. But just what is the Act, why is it important, and what is the current state of trade between the US and Africa?
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) and the Graduate Business School at UCT hosted a roundtable discussion on 28 July 2014 on the US-Africa Leaders Summit, 'What Future Does it Hold for US-Africa Trade and Investment Relations?'
A country’s international economic agenda is invariably shaped by its domestic constraints and socio-economic development objectives. The BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) states are no exception.
This week saw the Department of Trade and Industry (dti) Budget Vote presented to the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry. SAIIA would like to congratulate Minister Rob Davies on his reappointment and wishes both the Minister and dti officials well for the implementation of their work programme.