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Trade (545)

The unexpected presidential win by Donald Trump has sent shock waves across the globe, largely because during his presidential campaign a series of highly controversial statements were made by the Republican candidate on women, the fight against terrorism, migration and global warming.
In the run-up to this year’s presidential elections in the US, SAIIA’s experts will be providing weekly updates on the key developments, with a view to how the issues at stake might affect South Africa and Africa.
The Public Forum is an annual three-day event organised by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to facilitate discussions and debates from global actors on issues facing trade and development. This year's event, held from 27 to 29 September 2016, focused on 'Inclusive Trade' as a way to harness trade for the economic empowerment of the most marginalised members of society, and finding innovative ways to make trading conditions easier for them.
This week the United States (US) hosted African nations for the annual African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) forum under the theme: ‘Maximising AGOA now while preparing for the future beyond AGOA'. AGOA, a unilateral development programme offering African countries duty free access for select exports to the US, is set to expire in 2025.
The TRADE research entity at the North-West University and SAIIA jointly held a workshop on 'Navigating Global Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds: New Directions for Industrial and Trade Policy'.
SAIIA and the Embassy of Switzerland in South Africa held a panel discussion on 'Reflections on how to create a transparent and sustainable location for doing business in the commodities sector: the Swiss case.' This discussion was led by H.E. Marie-Gabrielle Ineichen-Fleisch, Swiss State Secretary for Economic Affairs.
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international regulatory treaty between 182 member states. It was formed in 1973 and regulates the international trade in over 35,000 wild species of plants and animals.
The 11th G-20 Summit in Hangzhou, China closed earlier this week, focusing on the 'New' Industrial Revolution and technological changes, such as big data, robotics, and cloud computing. Innovation has been China’s key area of interest throughout their G-20 Presidency, dedicating many discussions to how new industries could invigorate the global economy.
The international investment landscape has been shifting over the past two decades. Governments are increasingly realising the potential for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to achieve not only economic growth, but developmental objectives as well.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 34, August 2016
Three countries in southern Africa have banded together to press for the ban on international trade in ivory to be lifted. South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe have submitted a joint proposal to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). They are asking for permission to trade in ivory without which, they argue, there are no positive incentives to conserve elephants or their habitats.
A meeting on the SADC Regional Investment Framework is taking place in Johannesburg this week, to look at, amongst other priorities, investment in regional and global value chains. These discussions will take place against the background of slowing global economic growth and a decline in commodity earnings for African countries.
SAIIA, the Economic Policy Forum (EPF) and the Southern-African-German Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SAGCC) held a Business Breakfast Discussion on 'Regional Drivers and Barriers to Business' on 26 July 2016.
The Beitbridge border between Zimbabwe and South Africa, the busiest border post in Southern Africa, has been rocked by unprecedented violent protests since June. The protests largely concern the restrictive trade measures unexpectedly introduced by the Zimbabwean government, which included banning the importation of basic commodities like body creams, baked beans and bottled water.
SAIIA is holding a roundtable discussion on 'A Step Too Far or a Legitimate Balancing Act? Reflection on the US decision to block the reappointment of a WTO Judge of Appeal' led by Professor Meredith Lewis.
What many political and financial analysts viewed until a day before the British referendum on a European exit as scaremongering has come to be. The 72% voter turnout resulted in a 51.9% vote to leave the EU and a 48.1% vote in favour of remaining. While it essentially signals a split down the middle of UK voters, a closer look at the results reveals that the majority of voters in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the city of London supported the ‘remain’ vote, while the rest of England and Wales with a few small exceptions voted in favour of ‘leave’.
Who would have thought that the Brexit debate’s rising emotions would have reached their apogee in a horrific killing in the streets of a West Yorkshire town a week before the referendum that will determine the economic and global trajectory of Britain? The stakes are high, but it is equally clear that for all the expert opinions on the foolishness of an exit, many people may well vote with their hearts this Thursday, driven by a rhetoric that plays to bygone days of unmitigated national sovereignty and an imperial Britain that ‘ruled the waves’ and was at the centre of…
The 2016 US presidential elections are just around the corner, and the world has been watching closely as this year’s particularly colourful and controversial campaigns have unfolded. Last week, when South Africa's Minister of International Relations and Co-operation, Nkoana Maite-Mashabane, was asked about her position on the US elections, she responded that she does not really care who wins. This begs the question: can Africa’s most sophisticated economy afford to ignore the US elections?
On 4 May 2016, SAIIA and the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) hosted a multi-stakeholder dialogue to engage some of the region’s most influential policymakers and private sector actors. This event generated a meaningful discussion on the opportunities for service sector development and the achievement of sustainable development objectives.
On 18 March 2016, SAIIA and the Embassy of Japan cordially hosted two briefings, on 'The New Development Bank and its place in the Development Finance Sector in Africa: Perspectives,' and 'The potential for the development of regional value chains in the Automotive Sector in SADC: Lessons from the ASEAN Experience.'
The US Congress passed the African Growth and Opportunity (AGOA) Act into law in 2000 in order to promote US and African trade relations and contribute to economic development on the African continent through export-led growth. AGOA and the US – African trade relationship has been placed under the spotlight in recent months, particularly with regards to the extension of the Act towards September 2015 and around South Africa’s continued benefits under the programme (as the largest AGOA beneficiary). 
The US-South African trade relationship has garnered significant attention over the past couple of months, following US President Barack Obama’s notice to South Africa that the country’s benefits under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) will be suspended if it continues to impose longstanding trade barriers to US trade.
South Africans will remember the second and last business weeks of December 2015 for a long time to come because that particular period was characterised by almost unprecedented drama within South Africa's governance structures, as Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene was sacked.
On 2 February, SAIIA hosted a talk by Florizelle Liser, Assistant US Trade Representative for Africa and Sharon Bomer Lauritsen, Assistant US Trade Representative for Agricultural Affairs and Commodity Policy. They discussed issues related to the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the future of the trade relationship between the US and South Africa.
SAIIA cordially invites you to the launch of the World Bank’s publication, 'Factory Southern Africa? SACU in Global Value Chains', on 21 January 2016.
On Thursday, 21 January 2016 SAIIA will host launch of the World Bank publication, 'Factory Southern Africa? SACU in Global Value Chains'. The publication is the result of an extensive collaborative effort across many organisations and experts that have contributed within their fields of expertise.
Just this week, US President Barak Obama set a new deadline with regards to South Africa's privileges under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a non-reciprocal trade preference programme which provides duty-free access to the US market for certain products from eligible sub-Saharan African countries.
MEDIA ALERT:  NAIROBI AND BEYOND: WHAT PROSPECTS FOR THE WTO?   10th Ministerial Conference in Nairobi, Kenya    15 to 18 December 2015   Dear Editors and Journalists   The 10th Ministerial Conference of the  World Trade Organization (WTO)  will be held in Nairobi, Kenya, from 15 to 18 December 2015. It will be chaired by Kenya's Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Amina Mohamed. This will be the first time the organisation’s highest decision-making body will meet in Africa amid irreconcilable differences in positions of WTO members, with some already predicting that any significant progress in concluding the Doha…
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