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South African foreign policy (200)

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) are delighted to invite you to a Book launch on South African Foreign Policy: Identities, Intentions, and Directions with the support of the University of the Witwatersrand’s Department of Political Science and the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences.
Visiting Bradlow Fellow
Visiting Bradlow Fellow
In a midnight press-release, President Zuma announced the results of his latest cabinet reshuffle, that predictably included the sacking of the country’s revered Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan.
In February 2015, South Africa experienced an upsurge of xenophobic attacks throughout the country.  In response to this horrendous act, SAIIA Chief Executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, wrote this article and former senior researcher Tjiurimo Hengari wrote a related paper on the subject ‘Xenophobia Trivialises South Africa’s Ambitious Africa Policy’. Earlier this week the violent acts flared up again in Pretoria West. The institute again calls for an end to the violence and the stereotyping of certain groups as more crime-prone than others. South Africa must address the ‘demon’ of xenophobia and violence once and for all if it is to remain…
South Africa has variously styled itself as a ‘bridge’ between the North, the global South and Africa as well as a ‘gateway’ into the continent. It also sees itself as a spokesperson for Africa, given its membership of the alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa BRICS and the G20.
SAIIA Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by The Executive Mayor of Cape Town Patricia de Lille on 'The Role of Cities in International Relations - with specific reference to Cape Town.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 248, December 2016
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
South Africans woke up on the morning of 21 October 2016 to the shocking announcement that the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana Mashabane, had submitted an instrument of withdrawal from the Rome Statute to the UN Secretary General in New York, two days before. This notification signals South Africa’s intention to withdraw from the Statute that established the International Criminal Court (ICC) in a year’s time.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 150, July 2016
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Dr Wilmot James, on 'South Africa in the World Today: Resetting our Foreign Affairs Doctrine for the 21st Century'.
In the latest SAIIA event exclusively for our diplomatic and corporate members, we were pleased to host an Executive Briefing on 'The Africa we want: Unpacking the primacy of Africa in South Africa’s Foreign Policy'.
On 12 May 2016, SAIIA's Western Cape Branch held a public seminar addressed by Mr Richard Steyn, on 'Jan Smuts - forgotten by history?'. SAIIA also celebrated its 82nd birthday on this day.
The importance of international relations to a country’s well-being is not always apparent to the ordinary person in the street. Often regarded as an unnecessary expense when a country such as South Africa faces significant economic and social challenges, ministries of foreign affairs easily fall prey to the fiscal austerity knife.
The Annual SAIIA Interschools Quiz was held on 26 April 2016, at Bishops Diocesan College.
Discussions about the Global Commons often veer towards a consideration of great power engagement and commercial activities in the Arctic Circle – made possible by the effects of climate change. However, these developments are equally pertinent for the Antarctic Circle, the subject of a new SAIIA research report.
SAIIA Research Report No 23, March 2016  Download - English Foreign Policy Programme One of the most effective global governance regimes of the post-World War II period that has received very little attention over the years is the Antarctic Treaty. Driven by Cold War pressures and a failure to regulate multiple and overlapping land claims in Antarctica, the US initiated a process that led to the 1959 Antarctic Treaty (the Treaty). Of the 50 Treaty members, 29 (including South Africa) are 'consultative parties' with voting rights. The Treaty provides for inspections and stipulates, inter alia, that Antarctica should remain a…
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs, Volume 23.1, is now available. This issue includes articles on topics such as the impact of the diplomacy of cities and other sub-state actors on international development; the record of the African Union and the Responsibility To Protect doctrine in the post-Côte d’Ivoire period; shale gas production regulation in South Africa; and calls for a new development paradigm in the global South based on a 'decolonial' orientation, in which Ubuntu and 'living well' would be prioritised.
President Jacob Zuma, accompanied by seven members of his executive and a dozen business leaders, undertook a high profile and widely commented state visit to Nigeria earlier this month. The visit, the first for President Zuma since President Muhamadu Buhari took power in peaceful and democratic elections in 2015, had been highly anticipated.
As a member of the BRICS, a leader in African peacekeeping, and an aspiring UN Security Council permanent member, South Africa plays a significant role in global governance and aspires to a greater role. To better understand the factors driving South African foreign policy — both aspirations and limitations — SAIIA and the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations held a workshop on 1 March 2016 in Cape Town.
On 16 February 2016, SAIIA National Chairman Mr Fred T Phaswana delivered his annual address. What follows is the full text of the speech.
President Jacob Zuma’s visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo on 16 October 2015 came at a critical time in the bilateral relations of the two countries, with South Africa having made significant investments in the DRC’s political process since the late 1990s.
Since the establishment of its constitutional democracy in 1994, South Africa has emerged as an important continental and global player on African issues. This special issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs, marking the 80th anniversary of the South African Institute of International Affairs, is a compilation of articles from the Journal covering the development of South African foreign policy over the past twenty years since its re-entry on the world stage. 
Today, 5 October 2015, South African authorities are expected to submit their reasons for failing to arrest Sudanese President Al-Bashir when he attended the African Union Summit in June 2015. The furore that erupted has fuelled concerns about the place of human rights in South Africa’s foreign policy and highlights the importance for us to consider the nuances of the country’s foreign policy.
Today, the UN General Assembly (UNGA) will convene for the 70th time since its inception in 1945, at the UN headquarters in New York. UNGA takes place every year and is one of the few times during which heads of state from all over the world attend to discuss matters of global import.
On 24 August 2015, SAIIA's Western Cape Branch hosted an address by Mmusi Maimane, leader of the Democratic Alliance.
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