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South African foreign policy (210)

South Africa’s 2019 general elections will be a critical moment for democracy as the country welcomes a post-Zuma future. Equally important is the impact of his presidency on South Africa’s international standing. This piece will reflect on South Africa’s foreign policy under President Zuma - exploring the direction and key achievements and shortcomings/failures during his tenure. To what extent has South Africa’s foreign policy in the Zuma administration responded to domestic and continental needs?
The lesson of a decade’s state capture in South Africa may be that citizens and organised civil society should not limit active participation in political processes only to election time, and institutions are only as good as the people who respect them in letter and in spirit.
Jacob Zuma has resigned as South Africa’s president – an inevitable move, following the African National Congress’ withdrawal of its support. Two decades after Nelson Mandela tried – and failed – to pass the presidency to Cyril Ramaphosa, the former deputy president and current ANC head has become South Africa’s leader. And the challenges that Ramaphosa will face are almost as daunting as those Mandela confronted in lifting his country from the ruins of apartheid.
One of the enduring images of 2017 was US President Donald J. Trump, a few months into his tenure, squinting bare-eyed at a solar eclipse. During his first year in power, Africa was in a similar position, watching while his presidency slowly blocked out the superpower behind him.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 166, October 2017
Oliver Reginald Tambo was the face of the ANC in exile.
The electoral commission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) this week announced that elections will be postponed until 2019. Elections originally scheduled for December 2016 were pushed back by a year in an agreement struck on 31 December 2016, to accommodate government concerns around an updated voters’ roll with the growing urgency of holding elections.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 270, September 2017
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 265, September 2017
The Southern African Development (SADC) heads of state met in Pretoria to discuss developments in the region, they will do so under new stewardship from Angola and South Africa. Angola will assume leadership of the Organ on Politics Defence and Security Cooperation (OPDSC), while South Africa assumes overall chairmanship.
In June, South Africa’s public protector announced there would be a new investigation into the #GuptaLeaks allegations of corruption at the highest levels of government. It’s a symptom of South Africa’s broader problems.
The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) are delighted to invite you to a Book launch on South African Foreign Policy: Identities, Intentions, and Directions with the support of the University of the Witwatersrand’s Department of Political Science and the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences.
On 30 June South Africa’s ruling party, the African National Congress, kicked off its week-long policy conference in Johannesburg. Party cadres will meet under the (now ironic) call “The year of Oliver Reginald Tambo: Let us deepen unity!” in memory of one of the ANC’s most formidable and respected leaders.
Visiting Bradlow Fellow
In a midnight press-release, President Zuma announced the results of his latest cabinet reshuffle, that predictably included the sacking of the country’s revered Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan.
In February 2015, South Africa experienced an upsurge of xenophobic attacks throughout the country.  In response to this horrendous act, SAIIA Chief Executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, wrote this article and former senior researcher Tjiurimo Hengari wrote a related paper on the subject ‘Xenophobia Trivialises South Africa’s Ambitious Africa Policy’. Earlier this week the violent acts flared up again in Pretoria West. The institute again calls for an end to the violence and the stereotyping of certain groups as more crime-prone than others. South Africa must address the ‘demon’ of xenophobia and violence once and for all if it is to remain…
South Africa has variously styled itself as a ‘bridge’ between the North, the global South and Africa as well as a ‘gateway’ into the continent. It also sees itself as a spokesperson for Africa, given its membership of the alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa BRICS and the G20.
SAIIA Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by The Executive Mayor of Cape Town Patricia de Lille on 'The Role of Cities in International Relations - with specific reference to Cape Town.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 248, December 2016
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
South Africans woke up on the morning of 21 October 2016 to the shocking announcement that the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana Mashabane, had submitted an instrument of withdrawal from the Rome Statute to the UN Secretary General in New York, two days before. This notification signals South Africa’s intention to withdraw from the Statute that established the International Criminal Court (ICC) in a year’s time.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 150, July 2016
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Dr Wilmot James, on 'South Africa in the World Today: Resetting our Foreign Affairs Doctrine for the 21st Century'.
In the latest SAIIA event exclusively for our diplomatic and corporate members, we were pleased to host an Executive Briefing on 'The Africa we want: Unpacking the primacy of Africa in South Africa’s Foreign Policy'.
On 12 May 2016, SAIIA's Western Cape Branch held a public seminar addressed by Mr Richard Steyn, on 'Jan Smuts - forgotten by history?'. SAIIA also celebrated its 82nd birthday on this day.
The importance of international relations to a country’s well-being is not always apparent to the ordinary person in the street. Often regarded as an unnecessary expense when a country such as South Africa faces significant economic and social challenges, ministries of foreign affairs easily fall prey to the fiscal austerity knife.
The Annual SAIIA Interschools Quiz was held on 26 April 2016, at Bishops Diocesan College.
Discussions about the Global Commons often veer towards a consideration of great power engagement and commercial activities in the Arctic Circle – made possible by the effects of climate change. However, these developments are equally pertinent for the Antarctic Circle, the subject of a new SAIIA research report.
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