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Peace and Security (344)

12 September 2012: Somalia's Parliament elected a new president of the country's fledgling government on September 10th, a move that members of the international community say is a key step toward the east African nation's transition from a war-torn failed state to a nation with an effective government. Lisa Otto, a researcher with SAIIA who has studied piracy in the Gulf of Aden, was invited to appear on CNBC Africa's Political Exchange show. Along with fellow panellist Professor Faried Essack from the University of Johannesburg, she discusses whether this optimism is matched by political and security realities on the ground…
12 September 2012: Somalia's Parliament elected a new president of the country's fledgling government on September 10th, a move that members of the international community say is a key step toward the east African nation's transition from a war-torn failed state to a nation with an effective government.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 55, August 2012
In his public address at Jan Smuts House on 3 September, the Deputy Minister of International Affairs and Cooperation, the Honorable Ebrahim Ebrahim asserted the primacy the South African government places on the negotiated settlement of disputes in the attainment of sustainable peace and security on the continent and elsewhere.
South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to a Speaker’s Meeting to be addressed by Honourable Deputy Minister Ebrahim Ebrahim Department of International Relations and Cooperation, Republic of South AfricaVenue: Jan Smuts House
With a two-decade long history of instability, upheaval and violence, Somalia has become the poster child of the failed state. With the end of the country’s transition in sight on August 20, the country should now find itself on the precipice of democracy. Instead, it is no nearer functional statehood than it was in 2004 when the Transitional Federal Government (TGF) was established under the leadership of Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed.
Launched this month, "Community of Practice" is a new blog with fresh insight on Africa-related research. This blog gives individuals an online space to converge and take part in discussions with others around the world who are committed to improving Africa.
The rising threat of piracy along Africa's eastern coastline was brought home to many South Africans after the recent rescue and release of a South African yachting couple, Bruno Pelizzari and Debbie Calitz, following 20 months of captivity by pirates.
South African Institute of International Affairs invites you to a roundtable discussion to be addressed by Professor Jan Wouter on "Libya and the Arab Spring – R2P, human rights and the role of regional organisations"Venue: Jan Smuts House
Like Libya last year, the rapidly deteriorating situation in Syria is forcing tough foreign policy choices the world over. In Ankara, the Turkish government has made its opposition to the Bashar al-Assad government crystal clear. The country's border with Syria is nowadays a porous line across which refugees flee to get away from a country going up in flames. Dissidents and elements of the loosely defined Free Syrian Army also use this border as a space to run logistics. Factions that support either the Assad government or opposition forces in Syria clashed in Lebanon during recent weeks.
An unexpected wave of popular protests broke on Africa's northern shores in 2011, starting with the political demise of the Tunisian and Egyptian presidents, leading to more deadly conflict in Libya. These events – particularly those in Libya – have divided the African Union (AU), and shaken the organisation's fragile new foundations of democracy promotion and conflict prevention.
South African Institute of International Affairs in association with Penguin Books South Africa Cordially invites you to a Speaker's Meeting at which Heidi Holland will introduce her new book 100 Years of Struggle – Mandela's ANCVenue: Jan Smuts House
Address by Benjamin Pogrund and Bassam Eid on "In two minds: An Israeli and a Palestinian Perspective on Peace in the Middle East" The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Benjamin Pogrund and Bassam Eid (moderated by former Ambassador to Jordan, Mr Boy Geldenhuys) on "In two minds: An Israeli and a Palestinian Perspective on Peace in the Middle East"Venue: The Centre for the Book, SAIIA Western Cape
SAIIA’s National Council met at Jan Smuts House on 29 February 2012. This is the statement delivered by SAIIA's National Chairman, Fred Phaswana. When we met eleven months ago, the northern rim of the African continent was entering a period of instability and change, dubbed the Arab Spring. While there is always the inclination encouraged by the media to see these developments as short-term events, the reality has proved once again that they formed part of processes of change that have still not run their full course. In fact, instability spread beyond Africa into the rest of the Arab world…
Maritime piracy – and Somali piracy in particular – has arisen since the early 2000s as a major problem that not only plagues Africa, but constitutes a global dilemma. Despite the best efforts of the international community, pirate attacks have continued unabated. Kenya's relative stability and geostrategic location makes it a crucial actor to be involved in all aspects of counter-piracy in the region. How though, is this being articulated in Kenya's foreign policy?
On 1 January 2012 South Africa entered the final year of its second term as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. The year got off to a demanding start as South Africa assumed the presidency of the UN Security Council for the month of January. Three factors will determine whether or not South Africa, in the second year of its term, is successful in offering continuity, creating coherence and building African consensus on steering the African agenda of the Council.
On the eve of the first year anniversary of the Arab uprisings, it is useful to reflect on the state of EU-Africa relations, particularly in the aftermath of the prominent role played by key EU member states in Libya.
22 December 2011: SAIIA's National Director, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, looks back at the major foreign policy developments from a South African and African perspective. Has South Africa benefitted from joining the Brazil-Russia-India-China (BRIC, now called the BRICS) group of emerging powers? How did the country do in its second term as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council? And what foreign policy lessons should President Jacob Zuma as his government take away in the light of this year's Libya crisis as a member of the African Union? 
South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), Western Cape Branch, invites you to an address by Rear Admiral Philip Schoultz speaking on "The SANDF: South Africa´s involvement in operations on the Continent" South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), Western Cape Branch, invites you to an address by Rear Admiral Philip Schoultz speaking on "The SANDF: South Africa´s involvement in operations on the Continent" on Tuesday 13 December at 5:30 pm (following the Branch's AGM which will begin at 5 pm sharp) At The Centre for the Book, 62 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens, Cape Town
2 December 2011: The consequences of climate change for both national and human security are profound. With Military Analysts increasingly looking into these consequences, there is a serious risk of 'securitising' the climate change agenda, leading simply to military responses rather than a more preventative course.
With the death on 20 October 2011 of Muammar Gaddafi, Libya enters a new and precarious phase. This special SAIIA feature addresses a series of inter-related internal, regional, and international security and political implications of developments in the country.
Monday, 24 October 2011

Half day Seminar on Iran

South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to a half day seminar on Iran. Iran is a major player in the Middle East and indeed Africa. Yet very little expertise on that country and its policies exists in South Africa. In an attempt to help redress this situation SAIIA will present a seminar on the subject. Date: Monday, 24 October 2011 Time: 9:30am - 12:30pm Venue: Jan Smuts House, East Campus, Wits University RSVP: Ndumi Nqunqa on email:Nondumiso.Nqunqa@wits.ac.za
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 36, October 2011
South African Institute of International Affairs in cooperation with the Embassy of Switzerland cordially invites you to a Roundtable Discussion on "The UN’s role in Africa and Africa’s role in the UN: The need for a new approach?" with Joseph Deiss President of the 65th Session of the UN General Assembly Date:            Monday, 17 October 2011Time:           12:30 for 13:00 until 14:30 (lunch will be served at 12:30 -Roundtable starts at 13:00)Venue:         Boardroom at Jan Smuts House, East Campus, Wits University, Johannesburg
There are two seemingly obscure consequences of 11 September 2001 attacks on the United States that do not receive the attention they deserve in public debate. The first is the rapid advances made in the field of unmanned weapons systems. The second consequence reflects on the role of covert operations in the murky realm of counter-terrorism operations. Ten years ago, US armed forces operated, by some calculations, between 50 and 100 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Today, the New York Times estimates that the Pentagon operates about 7 000 of these weapon systems.
A three day conference to thrash out, among other things, a roadmap to a new constitution and elections within a year in Somalia kicked off in Mogadishu on 6 September 2011. It is the first major political conference since the start of a 2007 insurgency.
In life realities on the ground often lay waste to the best-laid plans. So has it been for the AU in the Libyan crisis. Since the rebels entered Tripoli on August 21 the hand-wringing around the AU’s marginalisation by Nato during the campaign has reached a crescendo. In that period, the Transitional National Council (TNC) has been recognised as the legitimate government in Libya by many states, including 20 from Africa; there has been a diplomatic flurry of activity on both sides of the Mediterranean with pledges for reconstruction assistance… and oil contracts; and the Libya Contact Group met in…
On 23 August 2011, Tom Wheeler, former Ambassador and Research Associate at SAIIA, spoke to Lerato Mbele on CNBC Africa's Beyond Markets show on the meaning of the developments in Libya. Also feauring in this show is Daniel Kinnear, Senior Executive Associate at the Africa Strategy Group. [Duration: 10min 49sec] Watch the videoThis video is copyright of ABN Digital/ CNBC Africa.        
As published in The Thinker, Volume 30, pp.30-33 During March and April this year I spent a significant amount of time traversing the complex network of gravel roads that run from Hoima to the shores of Lake Albert in western Uganda. This Lake has become the epicentre of Uganda’s oil sector with nearly 2 billion barrels of proven reserves. Tullow oil that has been leading the exploration campaign recently signed a deal with Total and CNOOC to begin production this year or by the latest in 2012. Lake Albert lies in the Albertine Graben, and oil experts speculate that the…