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Peace and Security (319)

Are Southern providers more effective in facilitating peace processes, political settlements and building institutions in fragile states than traditional Western donors are? Is South-South peace-building different in approach, form and outcome than interventions by Western powers in conflict-affected areas?
In February 2015, South Africa experienced an upsurge of xenophobic attacks throughout the country.  In response to this horrendous act, SAIIA Chief Executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, wrote this article and former senior researcher Tjiurimo Hengari wrote a related paper on the subject ‘Xenophobia Trivialises South Africa’s Ambitious Africa Policy’. Earlier this week the violent acts flared up again in Pretoria West. The institute again calls for an end to the violence and the stereotyping of certain groups as more crime-prone than others. South Africa must address the ‘demon’ of xenophobia and violence once and for all if it is to remain…
Before fleeing over the weekend, President Yahya Jammeh plunged his country into a political crisis whose outcome will resonate far beyond Gambia’s borders. Having conceded victory to opposition candidate Adama Barrow after the 1 December election, Jammeh reversed himself a week later.
South Africa has variously styled itself as a ‘bridge’ between the North, the global South and Africa as well as a ‘gateway’ into the continent. It also sees itself as a spokesperson for Africa, given its membership of the alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa BRICS and the G20.
Just ten days into his tenure as United Nations’ Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres chose his first formal address to the UN to be about the importance of conflict prevention and sustaining peace. At a UN debate sponsored by the government of Sweden on 10 January, the new SG said, ‘Prevention is not just a priority, but the priority.’
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 248, December 2016
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 247, December 2016
Monday, 12 December 2016

Shifting paradigms of aid

On 12 December, SAIIA and the Centre on International Cooperation (CIC) organised a one-day workshop at the Baha’i International Community’s United Nations Office in New York. The workshop looked at the role of emerging actors in conflict-affected countries.
SAIIA Research Report No 24, November 2016 Download - English Foreign Policy Programme As the global development landscape continues to evolve, new and emerging actors – countries transitioning from being aid recipients to aid providers – are becoming increasingly visible on the global scene. Although the approaches, interests and resources of emerging donors are far from uniform, their increasing presence in global development – particularly in fragile and conflict-affected settings – could create new ways of thinking about foreign aid and contribute to more horizontal, equitable and efficient practices. The rise of these donors also poses challenges: their compliance with…
The already-anxious, West-aligned states bordering Russia are receiving alarmingly mixed messages from their NATO allies. At its summit in Warsaw in July, NATO agreed to deploy a battalion of troops to each of the three Baltic states and Poland to protect them against possible Russian attack.
SAIIA and the Institute for Security Studies invite you to a panel discussion on 'Violence Economics and the future of the ANC', 4 August 2016.
SAIIA Policy Briefings 151, July 2016
SAIIA Policy Insights No 32, June 2016 
With eight countries already going to the polls and seven more planning to do so before December, 2016 has been a busy year for elections in Africa. At the halfway point of the year, what can be concluded about democratic processes across the continent? And what can be expected from the coming months?
Looking back at the events of Europe’s migrant and refugee crisis in 2015, it is tempting to quote Dickens: ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’. Last summer, as large numbers of refugees, the majority fleeing Syria’s civil war, began to cross the Aegean Sea from Turkey to the Greek islands nestling near its shores, the European Union (EU) woke up to a refugee crisis on its own soil. The EU’s response, collectively and – more frequently – individually, was panicked, improvised and uncoordinated, driven by a mix of compassion and hostility.
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs, Volume 23.1, is now available. This issue includes articles on topics such as the impact of the diplomacy of cities and other sub-state actors on international development; the record of the African Union and the Responsibility To Protect doctrine in the post-Côte d’Ivoire period; shale gas production regulation in South Africa; and calls for a new development paradigm in the global South based on a 'decolonial' orientation, in which Ubuntu and 'living well' would be prioritised.
Last week, as political turmoil in Burundi continued to escalate, the African Union (AU) sent a delegation to the troubled East African state. The delegation was headed by South African President Jacob Zuma, and included leaders from Ethiopia, Gabon, Mauritania and Senegal. Shortly prior to that, UN chief Ban Ki-moon was in Burundi as part of international efforts to bring peace and stability to the country.
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a public seminar addressed by Professor The Honorable Gareth Evans, Former Australian Foreign Minister, on 'The Responsibility to Protect against Mass Atrocity Crimes: 10 Years On.'
SAIIA, in collaboration with the Australian High Commission, invite you to a seminar to be addressed by Professor The Honourable Gareth Evans AC QC Former Australian Foreign Minister, on 'Responsibility to Protect: Ten Years On'.
Volume 22.3 of the South African Journal of International Affairs, now available online, includes a special section entitled ‘Development Banks of the Developing World: Regional Roles, Governance and Sustainability.’      
In 2011, at the height of piracy attacks along the Somali coastline and the Gulf of Aden, 237 separate attacks were reported. This figure has fallen drastically over the years, with only 12 attacks being reported in 2014. This decline has been attributed to the collective efforts of the international community to address Somali piracy.
Today, the UN General Assembly (UNGA) will convene for the 70th time since its inception in 1945, at the UN headquarters in New York. UNGA takes place every year and is one of the few times during which heads of state from all over the world attend to discuss matters of global import.
On 27 August 2015, SAIIA hosted a discussion with Professor Jack Spence, SAIIA Honorary Research Fellow, on ‘Crisis Management: comparing 1914 and 2014’.
If tabloid headlines are anything to go by, the United Kingdom is fighting off the greatest invasion force threatening the island since the Blitz. The invaders this time are migrants and asylum seekers sneaking a ride on lorries, trains and ferries to get across – or underneath – the English Channel.
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