Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter this Topic By ...

Content Types

Regions

Countries

Natural Resources (407)

The announcement of a joint agreement between the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and Hebei Iron and Steel Group to open a steel mill in Phalaborwa could signal a new stage in the longstanding relationship between South Africa and China. Financed in part by the China Africa Development Fund, the deal reportedly involves the Chinese company taking a 51% share in the joint venture and building a processing plant that will go beyond the mere extraction of resources for export and generate local employment.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 201, September 2014
Understandably, the mining industry is not perceived as a bastion of environmental preservation. That many of the world’s minerals and hydrocarbons are found in pristine environments is an unfortunate but inescapable reality. Guinea’s tier-one iron-ore deposit, for instance, is under one of Africa’s last remaining rain forests.
In June 2014 Botswana’s Okavango Delta was enlisted as the 1000th UNESCO World Heritage Site – a status that underscores the Delta’s global ecological significance and highlights the need to protect and manage this important biosphere. September 2014 also marked the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Permanent Cubango-Okavango River Basin Commission (OKACOM) agreement that commits Namibia, Angola and Botswana, the three riparian states of the River Basin, to a coordinated and environmentally sustainable regional water governance strategy. In 1996 the Okavango Delta was also declared a Ramsar Site, further highlighting its status as a wetland of global importance.
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch invites you to a public seminar by Dr Mare Sarr on "Capital Flight and Oil in Africa."
High-school learners from across South Africa presented their research and recommendations on topics related to sustainable development and climate change at the 2014 SAIIA Sasol Environmental Sustainability Project Provincial Presentations in Gauteng (19 September 2014), Durban (26 August 2014) and Cape Town (28 August 2014).
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs (Volume 21.2) is now available online, featuring articles on topics ranging from the post-presidential diplomacy of Thabo Mbeki, to the M23 insurgency in the Democratic Republic of Congo, to greening economic growth in the South.
The 2014 South African Mining Lekgotla convenes in Johannesburg, on 13-14 August. This comes against the backdrop of unresolved challenges in the mining sector, including the recent protracted platinum strike, inter-union rivalries and violence, service delivery failure in mining communities and the persistent migrant labour system.
For well over a decade, a unique, but flawed global governance initiative, the Kimberley Process, has sought to assure customers that the high prices that they pay for diamonds - stones sold as symbols of love – are not associated with war and bloodshed. But more recently, the increasing production of synthetic diamonds in response to demand in emerging countries is threatening the stability of the entire diamond market.
At this week’s Mining Lekgotla (13-14 August 2014), the future of the currently suppressed platinum industry is likely to be a key agenda item. Whether fuel cell technology takes off is a critical determinant of what this future might look like.
The Mining Lekgotla (13 - 14 August 2014), comes at a time the South African mining sector is reeling following the longest and violent platinum strike in the history of the country. The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), which continues to monitor and follow developments in the mining sector through its Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme (GARP), has put together a set of resources to help observers and the media.
For a decade now the world has been engaged in what has been seen as a battle against blood diamonds perceived as funding wars in countries like Sierra Leone and DRC. The Kimberley process is one unique but flawed example of an attempt at global governance co-operation by producers and consumers to stamp out blood diamonds.
How natural resources are governed plays a significant role in determining development prospects in Africa. This encapsulates a key overarching lesson that has emerged from the recently-concluded second research phase (2010-2014) of SAIIA’s Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme (GARP).
The International Affairs Journal, Chatham House, the Marjan Centre at King’s College London and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) cordially invite you to a panel discussion on "War and biodiversity: security’s emerging new frontier" to launch the July issue of International Affairs.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 193, June 2014
On 22 June, four suspected illegal miners were found dead with gunshot wounds to the head at a gold mine near Johannesburg. Earlier this year, a rescue operation to remove illegal miners from the abandoned Gold One mineshaft on South Africa’s East Rand, revealed a reluctance to be rescued for fear of arrest. This brings to attention the scale and intractability of efforts to curb illegal mining.
To President Zuma’s credit, last Tuesday evening’s State of the Nation Address went straight to the heart of South Africa’s triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment. His vision of needed policy responses also put the National Development Plan (NDP) at the front and centre: government plans to achieve an economic growth rate of 5% by 2019.
“The Blue Economy is Africa’s future”. This was the unequivocal statement made by Seychelles Deputy President Danny Faure earlier this year at the 22nd Ordinary Session of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the African Union.
This is an exciting year for multinationals looking to exploit Africa’s ever-expanding oil reserves, which are increasingly accessible and economically recoverable as technology advances. The 2014 Africa Assembly of the Oil Council is hosting a conference towards the end of June to bring together oil executives and government officials to aid extractive endeavours in Africa’s oil and gas sectors.   
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 188, June 2014
The newly appointed Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Mr. Senzeni Zokwana, inherits a complex and divisive set of governance challenges within South Africa’s fisheries sector. Recent developments, however, suggest that his tenure may present an important opportunity to effect meaningful change and set South African fisheries on a more sustainable and prosperous path.
On 28 to 29 May 2014 the South African Institute of International Affairs hosted the fourth general meeting of the Governance of Africa’s Resources Research Network (GARN). Established in 2010, GARN is a pan-continental network of African research institutes with a shared interest in promoting the responsible, equitable and sustainable exploitation of Africa’s vast natural resources.
SAIIA Report No 16, May 2014 Download - English (2.21 MB)Development Effectiveness ProjectPlatinum mining is a major engine of South Africa’s economy, producing exports and generating employment for many South Africans. It is, however, highly dependent on skilled labour, engineers and technicians, who are drawn from the limited pool of graduates that are emerging from the weak South African schooling system. Public-private partnerships have been established in an attempt to address this gap.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 92, May 2014
If the European Union (EU) and the 'Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) can provide strong leadership in at least four key areas, EU companies can become better placed than their global peers to meet the stricter operation standards and developmental impact being demanded by communities and governments in Africa.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 91, May 2014