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Natural Resources (375)

Both the industry-led African Mining Indaba and its Civil Society-led counterpart, the Alternative Mining Indaba (AMI), take place in Cape Town every February. In 2015, SAIIA has continued with its efforts to help build a bridge across the Indaba divide, with two separate stakeholder engagements during the Indaba week involving government, corporate and community participants.
Putting aside all the controversies surrounding President Jacob Zuma’s delivery of the 2015 State of the Nation address, the speech is worth analysing.
Friday, 13 February 2015

SAIIA 2015 Change-Makers Forum

SAIIA is convenening its third annual high-level dialogue forum for ‘Change-Makers’ in the African extractive sector. This event will be held on on Friday, 13 February 2015, on the sidelines of the 2015 Mining Indaba in Cape Town, South Africa.
On 9 February 2015, SAIIA's Governance of Africa's Resources Programme hosted a Mining Indaba Roundtable on 'From Acid Mine Drainage to Fracking? South Africa’s capacity for environmental oversight of extractive industries'.
On 26 January 2015, President Jacob Zuma provided reasons for referring the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRD-AB 2014) back to Parliament. The Bill had been shepherded through parliament shortly before the 2014 national elections, and has been on the President's desk since then.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 5, December 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 123, January 2015
From 9 to 13 February, the mining world will descend on Cape Town for the globe's biggest annual Mining Indaba. SAIIA will be hosting two important events alongside the Indaba to address some of the critical questions facing the mining industry in Africa.
Global energy consumption will increase rapidly in the next decade. The current core energy production sites in the world economy are unlikely to be able to supply this increasing demand. A new book, containing chapters from SAIIA researchers Dr Ana Alves and Dr Agathe Maupin, looks at Sub-Saharan Africa's potential energy resources in this light.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 122, January 2015
Uncontrolled and often illegal sand mining activities are destroying some of South Africa’s most valuable natural resources at an unprecedented rate.
Happy new year to all our partners and friends! The year that has gone was characterised by South Africa’s fifth democratic elections, the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, and the growing power of Boko Haram and other radical Islamist groups in Africa. Across other parts of the world, old fissures seemed to re-emerge; whether in Europe’s growing right-wing wave, or in Ukraine and in the Middle East.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 116, November 2014
Botswana possesses an estimated 212 billion tonnes of coal, much of which is thermal quality and unsuitable for export. Under a conservative set of assumptions, however, the country could export roughly 72 million tonnes a year at peak production. But climate change concerns - and the impact of international climate change agreements to limit carbon emissions - may curtail the availability of future export markets.
Due to the increasing threat of climate change, the key role that energy plays in the interactions between societies and resources towards a sustainable development has gained broad attention. As renewable energy sources (RES) become more competitive in relation to other energy sources, they create another opportunity to attract additional investments in favour of a greener economy.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 4, November 2014
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs (Volume 21.3) is now available online, featuring articles on BRICS co-operation across the South Atlantic, collaboration by BRICS corporates in Africa, the nuclear security discourse, the question of Islamic Nationalism in Al Shabaab, ANC foreign policymaking under Mbeki and the question of conflict-free diamonds under the Kimberly process.
SAIIA’s Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme (GARP) works to improve policies governing Africa’s abundant natural resources. The programme analyses the key local, continental and global trends influencing the management, use, development and regulation of Africa’s natural resources. The short video above outlines the work of the programme, and how it contributes to the sound and sustainable use of Africa’s resources for development of the continent.
In recent years, there has been increasing interest in Africa's natural resources, spurred on by new mineral discoveries. Yet there has also been a growing sense that the exploitation of these resources has to result in a greater developmental gain for the continent.
As part of its 80th anniversary celebrations, SAIIA held a Foreign Policy Conference from 28 to 30 October 2014 on “Global changes, ‘Africa Rising’ and Agenda 2063: Implications for the foreign policies of South Africa and other African driver states”.
The announcement of a joint agreement between the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and Hebei Iron and Steel Group to open a steel mill in Phalaborwa could signal a new stage in the longstanding relationship between South Africa and China. Financed in part by the China Africa Development Fund, the deal reportedly involves the Chinese company taking a 51% share in the joint venture and building a processing plant that will go beyond the mere extraction of resources for export and generate local employment.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 201, September 2014
Understandably, the mining industry is not perceived as a bastion of environmental preservation. That many of the world’s minerals and hydrocarbons are found in pristine environments is an unfortunate but inescapable reality. Guinea’s tier-one iron-ore deposit, for instance, is under one of Africa’s last remaining rain forests.