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Investment and Development Finance (330)

Wednesday, 23 April 2008

Trade Policy Reports (2003-2008)

SAIIA's Trade Policy Report series, published between July 2003 and September 2008, covers a range of trade-related issues.  Topics include matters such as South Africa's current account deficit, intellectual property rights and South-South economic co-operation. 
eAfrica, Volume 2, February 2004 TANGANDA, the largest tea producer in Zimbabwe and one of the country’s most important exporters, had a pretty good crop last year. Despite low rains, it put Z$ 18 billion in profits on the books.
The Kebble-Maduna saga, the arms deal, the mining charter and mining royalty bill have thrown into sharp relief the complex and often fraught relationship between business and government. It also brings into question the critical rules of engagement.
Monday, 21 April 2008

A Luta Continua

Mozambique is South Africa’s second-biggest trading partner in Africa, but investors are waryEvery continent needs an America… this is how one South African investor responded when questioned about the importance of South African investment in a country like Mozambique. This comment immediately conjures up the image of the bully on the block, but the intention is subtler. It is widely accepted that the economic growth of Western Europe after the Second World War and the Asian economic miracle are a direct result of US investment and aid in those regions, and the opening of its market to their exports.
The recent announcement by the Minister of Public Enterprises, Jeff Radebe, that the South African government is investigating the option of legislation to regulate the behaviour of South African firms on the continent has resonated throughout the business community. South Africa has emerged as a significant investor over the last ten years in Africa.
As the city of Maputo prepares itself to host the World Economic Forum African summit this week under the theme Engaging Business in Development it is apt to reflect on the economic track record of Africa.
Tony Blair's Africa Commission is due to make its report public on how to assist African development early next year. What should this report contain? The problem for Blair and his fellow travellers is not that they lack the best intentions. The commission's establishment is an indication of the priority the UK prime minister has attached to Africa, which, he has said, is a "scar on the conscience of the world".
Why are most Africans in Sub-Saharan Africa poor and why are they getting poorer while most people in the rest of the world are becoming better off? The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund who have become Sub-Saharan Africa’s fairy godmother and godfather respectively, every year churn out statistics that tell the same tale – Africans are poor and in many instances have fallen so far down it is difficult to imagine them getting poorer. With poverty and growing impoverishment go conflicts over scarce and shrinking resources. Hence Sub-Saharan Africa’s apparently never ending cycle of violent conflicts.
EGYPT faces the first contested presidential elections in its history next Wednesday. President Hosni Mubarak’s ruling party, the National Democratic Party (NDP), is poised to win. Mubarak’s liberalisation of the economy, the introduction of fiscal, monetary and institutional reforms, and the country’s relative political stability are his trump cards. For international and local investors this means a continuation of investment-friendly policies.
MINING in Africa appears to be the lifeline for the viability and sustainability of SA’s mining giants, which are facing rising costs related to deep-level mining and ageing mines. A recent survey by the South African Institute of International Affairs, conducted among South African mining firms on their African operations, has found that most respondents see the continent as a promising market.
Although Africa boasts some lucrative emerging markets and oil and gas fields that, once fully operational, could be geo-strategically important for the North (given the volatility of the Middle East), the continent is off the radar screen of most foreign investors. In fact, its natural and mineral resources have been more bane than boon. It is up to African governments to lead they way in ensuring that Africa is put on the international business map.
Ghana has emerged as the hub for SA companies seeking to do business in West Africa. This is at the expense of the larger Nigeria, which is still seen as a risky investment destination, and Côte d'Ivoire, which descended into civil war two years ago.
THE World Economic Forum meeting in Cape Town will discuss the role that the private sector, and specifically SA, can play in supporting the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad).
With its capital and principal port of Dakar located on the westernmost point of Africa, Senegal is poised to become the gateway to Francophone west Africa. The semi-arid former French colony is regarded as the economic success in the region with its strong commitment to the rule of law and democratic institutions.
The ambitious eastward expansion of the European Union (EU), emphasised by the European Commission's recommendation to begin accession negotiations with Turkey, has not assuaged fears in SA and on the continent of a potential declining European focus on Africa.
22 April 2005, Business Day DEVELOPING Asia is moving up SA’s strategic agenda. In recent months China and India have dominated the headlines as we move to start free-trade negotiations with them. Those processes, particularly that with China, are proving contentious. Partly in consequence, little attention has been paid to southeast Asia.
Written by: Lyal White SAIIA: 2005 ISBN: 1-919969-30-6 Published by SAIIA and funded by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation. Series editor: Elizabeth Sidiropoulos
By Lyal WhiteSAIIA: 2005 ISBN: 1-919969-48-9Published by SAIIA and funded by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation. Series editor: Elizabeth Sidiropoulos The Global Best Practice series examines a number of case studies in various sectors, with the aim of assessing their potential applicability in the Africa developmental context.  
By Dianna Games Business in Africa Report, No 1, 2004 SAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-21-7Published by SAIIA & funded by the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria. In less than a decade, South Africa has become one of the top 10 investors in, and trading partner of, many African countries. This report looks briefly at four sectors and four countries. The sectors are banking; telecommunications; retail and food; and mining. The countries are Morocco, Ghana, Mozambique, and Uganda.
Edited by Greg Mills and Natasha SkidmoreSAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-26-8Pages: 70 The combined economies of China, Taiwan and Hong Kong amount to US$1,437 trillion making 'Greater China' the fourth largest economy in the world. What are the implications for South Africa and Africa of the continued expansion of the Chinese economy? Will the growth of 'Greater China' crowd Africa out of an increasingly competitive foreign direct investment market? Will it prove to be a competitor to African industries or will these challenges be compensated by the market opportunities on offer in China?
Edited by G Mills and G Shelton, 2003ISBN: 1-919969-12-8Pages: 85This book, a compilation of papers presented at a conference at the South African Institute of International Affairs on The Asia-Pacific and Africa: Realising Economic Potential, highlights the areas of opportunity in South and Southern Africa’s commercial relations with countries in the Asia-Pacific region.
Edited by Richard Gibb, Tim Hughes, Greg Mills & Tapani VaahtorantaSAIIA: 2002ISBN: 1-919810-44-7 Pages: 214The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) has, in the few short months since its drafting in Abuja in October 2001, become the accepted blueprint for the recovery of a continent dismissed by The Economist as ‘hopeless’. The ambitious programme has been adopted by the African Union and is supported by the G-8, thus establishing, in principle, the basis for the ‘partnership’ that conceptually sets NEPAD apart from the 18 African recovery plans that have preceded it.
In this report, the second in the NEPAD POLICY FOCUS series published by SAIIA's Nepad and Governance Project, Peter Farlam draws lessons from the experience of implementing public-private partnerships.
Business in Africa Report, No 9, 2007 by Judi Hudson SAIIA: 2007ISBN: 1-919969-16-0Published by SAIIA and sponsored by the Royal Danish Embassy in Pretoria Once a pariah state, South Africa now ‘seems poised to dominate the continent that once shunned its products and leaders’. The situation is somewhat different in Kenya. In effect, that country has managed to keep the South African business heavyweights at arm’s length. The experiences of South African companies doing business in Kenya show us that we cannot separate the successes from the problems of doing business in Africa. Indeed, some Kenyans have perceived some of…
Sir Nicholas Stern, from the British High Commission, is undertaking an international tour to promote The Stern Review and his economic message on the urgency of tackling climate change through active dissemination of the key issues. The Review was launched on 30 October 2006 and it has received significant and positive media coverage around the world. He will be at the institute where he will discuss his findings under the topic 'The Stern Review: Economics of Climate Change' at Jan Smuts House at 7pm. A copy of the Stern Review is available at www.sternreview.org.uk RSVP: Pumla Moguerane on (011) 339-2021 or mogueranep@saiia.wits.ac.za Venue: Jan Smuts House
SAIIA's Global Best Practice report series, produced in 2005 and 2006, offers case studies of various sectors and issues, with the aim of assessing their potential applicability in the African developmental context.
By Phillip Armstrong with Nick Segal and Ben Davis SAIIA: 2005 ISBN: 1-919969-26-8 Published by SAIIA and funded by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation. Series editor: Elizabeth Sidiropoulos The Global Best Practice series examines a number of case studies in various sectors, with the aim of assessing their potential applicability in the Africa developmental context.
by Dianna Games Business in Africa Report, No 3, 2004Business in Africa Project SAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-28-4Published by SAIIA & funded by the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria.     In the rush for markets into the rest of Africa after the country's 1994 democratic elections, South African companies did not regard Nigeria as a most favoured destination. However, it was not long before South African companies recognised that despite the perceived difficulties of the country, Nigeria was a market to be reckoned with. This report is based on a series of interviews conducted both in Nigeria and South Africa over several…
Business in Africa Report, No 2, 2004 by Neuma Grobbelaar SAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-23-3Published by SAIIA & funded by the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria Based on a survey conducted in November 2003 of 20 South African companies doing business in Mozambique, this publication tracks the experience of South African firms in that country. Although South Africa is a leading investor representing 49% of total foreign direct investment (FDI) from 1997-2002, the sizeable number of South African businesses does not imply that the country offers a trouble-free, uncomplicated business environment.
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