Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter this Topic By ...

Content Types

Regions

Countries

Governance, Democracy and Accountability (759)

SAIIA Policy Briefing No 77, November 2013
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, and Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung invite you to a public seminar to be addressed by Prof Paul Johannes Kevenhörster, on "An Assessment of the Political Developments in Germany and South Africa post 1990 with special reference to the adopted electoral systems."
15 October 2013 marked a year in office for Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma as Chairperson of the African Union Commission (AUC). While her election in July 2012 was a source of division among African Union (AU) member states, her reputation as a capable leader signalled a new dawn for the AU. South Africa, which sponsored her candidacy to the chagrin of key regional powers, including Nigeria, used her competencies to articulate implicit weaknesses in the AUC, while mobilising for high expectations regarding the future of the AU.
The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) has the potential to dramatically change the governance landscape on the continent. However, 10 years after its formation, the APRM has not fully captured the interest of African citizens and media. Why is this the case?
Wednesday, 09 October 2013

Should the AU pull out of the ICC?

The head of SAIIA’s Governance and African Peer Review Mechanism Programme (GAP), Steven Gruzd, speaks to PowerFM’s Chris Vick about the African Union’s special summit (on 12 October 2013) to discuss Africa's continued involvement in the International Criminal Court. Joining Steven on the panel is Tiseke Kasambala from Human Rights Watch.Click on the PowerFM player above to listen.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 74, September 2013
In 2013, the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic mark twenty years of their independence. The negotiated split of former Czechoslovakia on 31 December 1992 remains an example of peaceful conflict resolution. Both countries continued on the path of political and economic transformation after the fall of the totalitarian communist regime in 1989, on the basis of the reforms undertaken in the early 1990s in Czechoslovakia.
Public submissions to parliament on the revised Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRD-AB), originally gazetted in December 2012, were due last Friday September 6, 2013. It is hard to overstate the extent to which the final incarnation of this Bill will affect South Africa’s economic wellbeing.
In this podcast, SAIIA looks at the upcoming national elections in the Kingdom of Swaziland. The first round of elections began against the backdrop of continuing economic difficulties in Swaziland. The final round of parliamentary elections will take place on 20 September 2013 and King Mswati III, Africa's last absolute monarch, will subsequently appoint a new government. 
South African Institute of International Affairs invites you to a roundtable discussion to be addressed by Alex Vines, speaking on "Swaziland: Southern Africa's Forgotten Crisis."
Today, on 21 August 2013, a year has passed since the death of Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, the man considered to be the leading architect of post-Derg Ethiopia. Following his death, the future of a resurgent Ethiopia hung by a thread. Uncertainty mounted in the vast country of over 80 million inhabitants, with over 60 diverse ethnicities and two major religions that have cohabitated uncomfortably for decades.
The overarching mandate of the Southern African Development Community is the furtherance of socio-economic cooperation and integration, including political and security cooperation among its fifteen member states. Ordinarily, it is with these in mind that the 33RD annual SADC Summit is convening in Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. The agenda of the summit is congested, and is clearly illustrative of the multitude challenges facing the regional body nineteen years since its transformation in 1994 from the Southern African Development Coordination Conference, which was founded in 1980.
Marikana has elicited a voluminous spectrum of analyses. The most insightful have pointed to the need for deep structural reforms, including innovative means of addressing the persistent challenges of migrant labour. Few, however, have drawn parallels between Marikana and the central problem of violence in South African society more broadly.
The upcoming summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the 17 and 18 August 2013 is an annual regional meeting that brings together 15 member states. SAIIA speaks to Ambassador Kaire Mbuende, Namibia’s former representative to the United Nations and a former Executive Secretary of SADC.
The upcoming summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the 17 and 18 August 2013 is an annual regional meeting that brings together 15 member states. SAIIA speaks to Aditi Lalbahadur who is researcher with SAIIA's South African Foreign Policy and African Drivers Programme.
South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Professor Brian Raftopolous speaking on "Zimbabwe: post-election round up"
Wednesday, 07 August 2013

Turkey: Coups and Trials

The Turkish courts have sentenced an ex-general to life in prison as part of the so-called "Ergenekon trial", a high-profile case involving 275 defendants, including the military, politicians and journalists. The trial centered on a retired military chief of staff, Ilker Basbug, who was accused of plotting to topple the Turkish government. Former Ambassador to Turkey Tom Wheeler, a research associate with SAIIA, joined an expert panel on Voice of Russia to discuss the trial, and its probable consequences for the Turkish government and the nature of governance in Turkey. Click here to download the audio podcast of the show…
Even before Zimbabweans went to the polls on 31 July 2013, the Southern African Development Community’s Organ on Politics, Defence and Security raised a litany of concerns about the elections.SADC requested that the election be postponed in order to allow reforms as provided for in the Global Political Agreement to be effected.
As the votes are counted after yesterday's Zimbabwean election, we thought the following article might be of interest. An anonymous social media commentator has attracted the world's attention in the run-up to the election. SAIIA's Yu-Shan Wu (@yushan_wu) and Catherine Grant Makokera (@cathgmak) take a look at what they call "one manifestation of a silent revolution ... taking place."
South Africa’s gold mining industry is in a perilous condition. In the second quarter of this year alone, the gold price plummeted $220 (R2 153) an ounce, partly in the wake of US economic recovery, which has reduced the demand for gold as a secure store of value.
If there is one thing that is different to the 2008 Zimbabwean elections, it is that the 2013 election has a new ‘candidate’. His name is Baba Jukwa. The anonymous social media icon and commentator, portrayed as a cartoon of an old man and coined ‘the Julian Assange of Zimbabwe’, has attracted the world’s attention.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEDear Editors, 29 July 2013 SAIIA Media Alert: SAIIA expert analysis and commentary on the Zimbabwean election  Zimbabwean citizens go to the polls this week for what has been called one of the most important elections in Zimbabwe’s history since independence. President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu-PF and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) are expected to contest a tough election; the outcome of which has repercussions for South Africa and the Southern African Development Community (SADC).
Sunday, 14 July 2013

Egypt's unrest

At the beginning of July, millions of Egyptians marched to demand that Egypt’s first democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi resign. He was overthrown by the military on 3 July 2013 and the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, Adly Mansour, was installed as interim president. Hazem el-Beblawi, a 76-year-old liberal economist became interim prime minister to govern under a temporary constitution until parliamentary elections could be held in the next six months.
In a new podcast, SAIIA interviewed participants of the “African Peer Review Mechanism +10: Reviewing a decade of Peer Learning and Projecting a Future of Governance in Africa” colloquium, which took place on 17 and 18 May 2013 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
In 2012, Africa lost an estimated $43-$46 billion to illicit financial flows (IFF). Calculated over time, the size of this “shadow financial system” is staggering. For instance, between 1980 and 2009 the continent is estimated to have lost around US$1.3 trillion. This is according to a report by Global Financial Integrity (GFI) and the African Development Bank (AfDB) released in May 2013.
The recent 19th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, injected new momentum into the decade old African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) with the appointment of new leadership to the APR Forum and the APR Panel. President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Barrister Akere Muna will play pivotal roles in the two afore-mentioned governing bodies of Africa’s unique voluntary governance assessment instrument. How will the new appointments affect the mechanism that is heading into its second decade of existence?
SAIIA has recently relaunched its two regular newsletters, which are freely available to all. Trade Perspectives is a bi-monthly newsletter providing insights, analysis and updates on economic governance, trade policy and trade negotiations. This newsletter is produced by the Economic Diplomacy Programme at SAIIA. The next issue will be available this month. Governance Perspectives is a bi-monthly newsletter on the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), governance, democracy and accountability in Africa. It is published by the Governance and APRM Programme at SAIIA. The next issue will be available next month. To subscribe to either of these newsletters, please click here…
The recent global conference of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), convened in Sydney from 23-24 May 2013, provided an opportunity for the EITI board to adopt and launch the EITI Standard, a new set of membership criteria and reporting standards aimed at strengthening the contribution of the EITI to improved governance of extractive industries.