Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter this Topic By ...

Content Types

Regions

Countries

Governance, Democracy and Accountability (759)

SAIIA Occasional Paper No 183, April 2014
With a persistently high unemployment rate, building an economy that provides opportunities for all is extremely important to all the political parties contesting the 2014 South African general election.
The 20th commemoration of the Rwandan genocide this year offers an apt opportunity to reflect on how far Africa has come in preventing a reoccurrence of such a tragedy.
Good governance is broadly recognised as a necessary condition for peace and development in Africa. At the EU-Africa Summit held in Brussels on 2 to 3 April 2014, one of the five key priorities identified for joint action was ‘democracy, good governance and human rights’.
An internal Ukrainian crisis dating back to November 2013 took on an external dimension last month. Just as Ukrainians were starting to rebuild their country after months of protests and a change of leadership, Russia’s intervention in Crimea has shifted the focus, and set off alarm bells throughout Europe.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), the Institute for Research and Debate on Governance (Institut de recherche et débat sur la gouvernance - IRG) based in Paris and the Embassy of France in South Africa held a roundtable on ‘Making Elections More Legitimate in Africa’ on 25 March 2014.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 177, February 2014
SAIIA Report No 15, January 2014  Download - English (305.72 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeThis case study of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) seeks to examine the lessons it holds about South–South knowledge exchange, South–South co-operation (SSC), capacity development and development effectiveness. The report is based on desk research, personal interviews and an online survey.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 84, February 2014
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Ambassador Dr. Hisham AL-ALAWI, Embassy of Iraq, Pretoria, on “Building a stable and prosperous democracy in Iraq: Progress and Challenges”.
For the last ten years, the South African Institute of International Affairs has focused part of its research agenda on governance and the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM). Since its creation a decade ago, the APRM has been seen as a complicated process that is not well enough understood.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 172, January 2014
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 171, January 2014
Wednesday, 05 February 2014

SAIIA relaunches APRM Toolkit

On 29 January 2014, the highest decision-making body of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the Forum, met in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to admit its 34th and newest member – Equatorial Guinea – and to review progress in implementation of governance programmes in South Africa and Mozambique. Accession to the continent’s premier home-grown governance assessment instrument is voluntary and involves opening up a country for rigorous scrutiny of its governance practices. SAIIA researchers were there to observe proceedings, captured in the official communique from the Forum and an analysis of the 2014 Forum by SAIIA.
The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), a voluntary African governance promotion tool, now boasts an unprecedented 34 member states, 17 of which have completed their first reviews. But a lack of political enthusiasm for it – especially by heads of state – is endangering its relevance and impact on governance.
SAIIA's Governance of Africa's Resources Programme (GARP) cordially invites you to the Indaba Roundtable on Resolving labour tensions in African mining on 3 February 2014 in Cape Town.
The extraction of natural resources in Africa, such as oil, gas, diamonds and gold, is a critically important issue for the development and self-reliance of the continent. We spoke to the head of the Governance of Africa's Resources Programme at SAIIA, Oladiran Bello, about measures to ensure that revenues from this booming industry can be transparently and effectively managed.
2013 was marked by two important anniversaries related to governance in Africa, with the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) celebrating its tenth year in existence and the African Union (AU) marking fifty years since the establishment of its predecessor, the Organisation of African Unity. Both events were celebrated at the May 2013 AU Summit.
On New Year’s Eve 2014 over 100,000 Ukrainians attempted to set the Guinness World Record for the largest number of people simultaneously singing their national anthem. While such activities normally symbolise national unity, Ukraine remains as divided as ever. The former Soviet republic, independent since 1991 and with a population of 46 million, is faced with a choice of aligning itself closer to the European Union (EU) or Russia. The country’s unique geo-political location between the two actors makes it a highly desirable of area of influence for both.
The Marikana massacre in August 2012 forever altered the South African mining industry, particularly in the way labour unions and mining companies relate to each other. We spoke to SAIIA Research Fellow, Ross Harvey, about the state of the industry today.
Tata left us on 5 December 2013, a few months before we celebrate 20 years of South Africa's democracy, and hold our fifth democratic elections. Since then my memories of a February, 24 years ago, in 1990 have flooded back to me.
Contrary to the urgent calls for the reform of the Kimberley Process (KP), its year-end plenary took place in Johannesburg from 19 to 22 November 2013 without a breakthrough on the pressing reform questions. The outgoing chair, South Africa, will now handover to China in early 2014, with Angola in line to take the helm in 2015. Neither successor is likely to push hard on the reform front, underlying the extent to which South Africa’s own tenure had been a missed opportunity.
World Fisheries Day, celebrated each year on 21 November 2013, comes at a time when the South African Parliament is considering legislation that many feel will finally give small-scale fisheries a rightful stake in the country’s marine resources.
After successive postponements and delays since a coup d’état in 2009, 33 candidates contested the presidential elections in Madagascar on 25 October 2013. Counting of the votes has not been completed and results are trickling in, with both the Malagasy and the international community waiting for a result that could potentially restore democratic governance in that archipelago.