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Governance, Democracy and Accountability (759)

On 29 January 2016, a group of Africa’s Heads of State and Government met in Addis Ababa to determine the fate of one of the AU’s most daring initiatives. At stake was the future relevance of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).
The African Union (AU) is convening its January 2016 summit under the guiding theme: ‘African year of human rights with a particular focus on the rights of Women’. Notwithstanding the themes, which in part focus the deliberations at the Summit, the headlines and the pressing issues facing the continent will always steal the thunder from these lofty themes. This current summit is no different.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 146, January 2016
SAIIA, in collaboration with the High Commission of Canada and the US Embassy in Pretoria, invite you to a seminar to be addressed by three very special guests on the topic: 'Support for countries in transition: lessons from the liberation movement of South Africa'.
A new book by SAIIA, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t?, focuses on political and social developments to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
On 24 November 2015, South Africa’s Public Protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela, gave the keynote speech at the launch of SAIIA's book, 'African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn't.'
SAIIA has published a new book, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t? to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
SAIIA has launched a new book, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn't, with South Africa’s Public Protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela.
It’s that time of the year again: the month that marks 16 days of activism against gender-based violence. Familiar terms again dominate the discourse: violence against women, gender-based violence, sexual violence, intimate partner violence and domestic violence.
Ahead of the annual 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign (25 November - 10 December), Ugandan human rights lawyer Laura Nyirinkindi paid a visit to SAIIA. Nyirinkindi has been working on combating violence against women in Africa for the last ten years.
Since independence, most African states have struggled to develop effective institutions that are responsive to the governance and development needs of their respective societies. This challenge is reflected not only in the prevalence of social and political strife in many African countries, but also in the poor socio-economic performance of the continent as a whole. The same could be said of the slow progress towards greater regional and continental integration, which, to a large extent is symptomatic of a weak institutional culture across the continent.
‘Change’ was the word de jour as citizens headed to the polls for the fifth multi-party elections in Tanzania on 25 October 2015. At first glance, Tanzania seems to be a country on a clear trajectory to prosperity – maintaining a GDP growth rate of around 7 percent. Despite this impressive macroeconomic growth, distribution of wealth has been inadequate and poverty levels remain high. So did these polls deliver anything different?
In February 2016, Uganda will go to the polls. It is only the country’s third election held since the constitutional restoration of multi-party democracy in 2005 and it is widely expected to be one of the most contentious. How might Uganda’s participation in the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) contribute to better elections?
On 26 October 2015, SAIIA is holding a Roundtable Discussion on ‘Gender and Governance in Africa: Findings from 16 countries’.
After relatively peaceful elections in Guinea-Conakry returned outgoing President Alpha Conde to power last week in the first round of voting, another West African country - Côte d'Ivoire - is heading to watershed presidential elections on 25 October 2015.
‘African unity’ has been one of the most consistent themes in African political thought. Since independence, the vision of a continental order stretching from Cape Town to Cairo and from Dakar to Dar es Salaam has been an entrancing one. Africa, rather than being a geographical descriptor, would be a geopolitical identity.
Last week, four Country Review Reports were tabled at a Pan-African Parliament Plenary Session. This represents a crucial step forward for governance in Africa.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 222, September 2015
On 7 October 2015, SAIIA's Western Cape Branch hosted a public seminar addressed by RW Johnson on 'The International Ramifications of South Africa's Crisis'.
Why is the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the continent’s most important governance assessment and promotion tool, in the doldrums?
The sudden cancellation of an Extraordinary Summit on the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) raises serious concerns about the future of this important home-grown African governance and accountability tool. Nairobi was scheduled to host the APRM Forum of Heads of State and Government on 10-11 September 2015.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 141, August 2015
Pan Macmillan and SAIIA, Western Cape Branch, invite you to a book launch to be addressed by Greg Mills and Jeffrey Herbst, in conversation with Minister Lindiwe Zulu and Tony Leon, on 'How South Africa Works and Must Do Better.'
On Sunday 5 July 2015, more than 61 per cent of the Greek electorate voted 'No' to conditions of a financial rescue package. Greek leaders are returning to Brussels this week to argue for a more generous package, while the EU tries to assess the implications for Greece's euro-zone membership.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 138, June 2015
On Monday 22 June 2015, SAIIA and Chatham House hosted the launch of a report by Alex Vines, Director for Area Studies and International Law, on 'Mozambique to 2018: Managers, Mediators, and Magnates'.
As I write this, President al-Bashir has left the country. He should never have risked coming and the South African government should have suspected that something like this might happen.