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Friday, 25 May 2018

Celebrating Africa Day

Fifty-five years ago today, the Organisation of Africa Unity was born. Founded by 32 states, its quest was to bring about freedom and unity on the continent. The body was renamed the African Union in 2004 but its goal remains the same in 2018: a peaceful, prosperous and integrated Africa for all.
Pan-Africanism – the liberation of Africans through regional cohesion and solidarity – has played a crucial role in shaping the continent’s development.
Slovenia’s capital city Ljubljana – with a population of just 250,000 – is symbolised by dragons and is one of the greenest cities in Europe.
The African continent is unique for many reasons: our diverse landscapes, melting pot of cultures, rich biodiversity, fertile soils and vast mineral wealth. We’re the cradle of civilisation. We’re home to the longest river, largest desert and fastest animal. But most notably, Africa is unique because Africa is young. Young and full of potential.
The Report Card on International Cooperation gives a dismal C- to international efforts to mitigate the world’s most pressing problems in 2017, the same grade given for 2016.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 54, April 2018
The T20 Africa Standing Group (T20 Africa) held its first Annual Meeting “Building Consensus for Fair and Sustainable Development between G20 and Africa” from 14 to 15 of April in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
When US President Donald Trump announced that he would ask Congress to impose a 25% tariff on more than 1,300 Chinese imports amounting to an export value of US$50 billion, the world held its breath for signs of a full-blown trade war between the world’s largest economies.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 53, March 2018
In the wake of the impasse in the Doha Development Round (DDR) of multilateral trade talks, a number of countries have been looking at alternative ways to advance their trade agendas ‒ one of which involves the negotiation of plurilateral trade agreements (PTAs).
In 2017, more than one hundred countries began discussions on the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and the Global Compact on Refugees. Both seek to arrive at agreed-upon principles and commitments among UN states on issues facing migrants and refugees with the goal of creating a framework for international cooperation. A 2018 report from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) estimates that there are currently 244 million international migrants, or 3.3 percent of the global population. Meanwhile, the twenty-first century has witnessed a dramatic increase in refugees, to 22.5 million globally, and internally displaced people, to 40.3…
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 275, January 2018
Previously called the Africa-EU Summit, the AU-EU Summit convenes in Abidjan on 28 and 29 November this year. This triennial gathering brings heads of state together to discuss pressing issues facing Africa and Europe, including youth employment, gender, migration, economic cooperation, and the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) which governs the relationship between the two institutions.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 168, November 2017
SAIIA Policy Briefing 167, November 2017
The COP23 summit takes place amid complex global geopolitical dynamics, with President Donald Trump having announced the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement in June. The US is currently the world’s second largest producer of carbon emissions after China and its abdication makes this and other international negotiations more challenging. Entrenched national interests have exacerbated tensions.
‘Better city, better life’ is the UN’s slogan for World Cities Day, falling annually on 31 October. This year’s theme, ‘innovative governance, open cities’, references the idea that urbanisation has immense potential to improve people’s lives. Given the UN’s focus on using the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to advance global development by 2030, why is World Cities Day important? And what does it mean for Africa’s cities?
South Africa’s recent reversal of a ban on trade in rhinoceros horn has invigorated support for commercial farming of the product. But breeders' argument that a legal market will protect wild populations ignores how the illicit trade in wildlife products actually functions.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Prof Tim Hoyt on 'Trends in International Terrorism and the Changing Character of Contemporary Warfare'.
A South African court has ordered the government to release a permit to the world’s largest rhino breeder, John Hume. The permit will allow him to host a 3-day auction of his stockpiled rhino horn to local buyers.
A decade after the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) was launched; the AU and EU are laying the groundwork to renegotiate their relationship in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, come November. In preparation, 80 civil society representatives from both continents were invited to share views on the focus of the partnership in July in Carthage, Tunisia.
In 2016, one of the defining terms when it came to the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) political situation was 'le glissement'. Meaning 'slippage', this word was popularly used to refer to President Joseph Kabila’s efforts to stay in office by repeatedly delaying elections The strategy worked. Kabila’s mandate officially ended in December 2016, yet he is still president and there are still no signs of an upcoming vote.
Meeting his counterparts in Europe on his first overseas trip in May, President Donald Trump failed to reassure them that the military alliance, which has been the backbone of the Atlantic relationship since the end of the Cold War, will receive the same degree of commitment from the US as in the past.
In a world facing growing chasms between poor and rich, terrorism and global pandemics, as well as challenges around political stability and accountability, the time has never been more urgent to facilitate an inclusive global discourse on solving these challenges.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the Global Economic Governance Africa (GEGA) Programme invite you to a conference on Finance and Development: Experiences in south-south collaboration from Africa, Asia and Latin America
On 24 March, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued its first order awarding financial compensation – on an individual basis – to the victims of the Bogoro village attack in 2003 in the Ituri district of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The court sentenced Former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga in March 2014 to 12 years in prison (later reduced to eight years), on four counts of war crimes and one count of crimes against humanity for these atrocities. Breaking new ground, a symbolic compensation of $250 has been awarded to each of the 297 identified victims of those…
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