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Global Economic Governance (281)

SAIIA and the Ethiopian Economics Association (EEA), together with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), hosted a workshop at the Beshale hotel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
On 1 February 2017, a high-level conference on Africa’s relationship with the Group of 20 (G20) was opened by the German Parliamentary State Secretary Thomas Silberhorn, who spoke on the key priorities of the German G20 Presidency. A dinner keynote that evening will be delivered by Deputy Governor Daniel Mminele of the South African Reserve Bank.
Lesotho is facing challenges in financing its Queen Mamohato Hospital which costs USD$67 million a year and represents half of the country’s meagre health budget.
Ratings agencies will again this week consider South Africa’s sovereign credit rating. Ratings agencies have indicated that South Africa’s economic growth needs to be at least 1%, up from the current rate of between 0.5 – 0.9%, in order to off a downgrade to ‘junk’ status. Last month, Minister Pravin Gordhan made some bold claims about infrastructure spending in his mid-term budget speech.
It is common knowledge that SMEs make a significant contribution to their countries’ economies, but they often operate in a kind of twilight zone — seen and acknowledged, but not properly understood or catered for at the policy level.The 2016 WTO Public Forum staged at the end of September in Geneva with the theme of ‘Inclusive trade’ lifted the lid on the hurdles that SMEs face in trying to turn entrepreneurial ideas into viable businesses. However, the services sector offers new hope to small businesses in LDCs (least-developed countries) where weak manufacturing potential is a constraint to further development.
The Global Economic Governance (GEG) Africa programme is a policy research and stakeholder engagement programme to strengthen the influence of African coalitions at global economic governance fora such as the G20, BRICS, WTO and World Bank, in order to bring about pro-poor policy outcomes.
The Public Forum is an annual three-day event organised by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to facilitate discussions and debates from global actors on issues facing trade and development. This year's event, held from 27 to 29 September 2016, focused on 'Inclusive Trade' as a way to harness trade for the economic empowerment of the most marginalised members of society, and finding innovative ways to make trading conditions easier for them.
SAIIA, DNA Economics and Tutwa Consulting are extremely pleased to be collaborating on a new project, Global Economic Governance Africa (GEG Africa), the first phase of which SAIIA managed from 2012-2015.  Following consultations with stakeholders, this new phase will provide more in-depth political and economic analysis of evolving GEG policy priorities in South Africa and across the continent.
As the full extent of the potential for the world to enter into a Great Depression became clearer in 2008, the G20 Finance meeting was elevated to a Leaders 20, a point that had for some years been advocated by former Canadian prime minister, Paul Martin, among others. Its convening confirmed what many had known for some time – that the G7 was no longer able to manage global crises on its own. The G20 represented most of the systemically important economies whose cooperation and coordination were essential to avert a Great Depression.
The UCT Graduate School of Business Connect and the South African Institute of International Affairs will host a round table with Dr Andreas Dombret, Member of the Executive Board Deutsche Bundesbank, on 'Global political uncertainty and its implications for the post-crisis supervisory and regulatory regime.'
Africa’s infrastructure financing deficit, estimated to be $100 billion a year, remains persistently large. The resulting lack of investment in energy, transport and water infrastructure on the continent presents a significant barrier to economic growth and development.
SAIIA is holding a roundtable discussion on 'A Step Too Far or a Legitimate Balancing Act? Reflection on the US decision to block the reappointment of a WTO Judge of Appeal' led by Professor Meredith Lewis.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 227, January 2016
On 11 November 2015, SAIIA held a media briefing on ‘The G-20: From Turkey to China – taking stock and looking forward’ to review developments and successes achieved under the Turkish Presidency, notably in relation to its impact on developing countries.
On 11 November 2015, SAIIA will hold a media briefing on 'G20: From Turkey to China – taking stock and looking forward'.
A new project, coordinated by SAIIA, is exploring how multilateral trade negotiations can be revitalised to overcome both existing and emerging challenges.
On 15 October 2015, SAIIA will hold a Roundtable Dialogue on ‘Nairobi and Beyond: What Prospects for the WTO?’
As the World Trade Organization enters a period of readjustment after the Bali deal, there is a need to search for new ideas that can assist in revitalising multilateral trade negotiations. SAIIA and the Cordell Hull Institute have co-ordinated an exciting new project, 'Restoring Multilateral Trade Co-operation Project', in partnership with the World Bank and a network of developing-country think tanks.
Seoul, South Korea 12-14 February 2014: 1st RoundtableHosted by: the Korean Institute of International Economic PolicyDownload Chairman's statement (84 kB)
That the World Trade Organization (WTO) has been in the grip of a systemic crisis since 2008 is well known. Notwithstanding relatively minor successes at the Bali Ministerial in December 2013, the WTO’s negotiating function remains effectively stalled. The Nairobi Ministerial, set to take place in December 2015, is not likely to yield systemic solutions, notably to break the Doha Round impasse.
A high level dialogue organised by ICTSD and SAIIA on 28 and 29 July 2015 is an opportunity to revisit several challenges facing Africa and Southern Africa more specifically in the context of new developments and data that have emerged in recent years.
Heads of state of the BRICS countries will gather in Ufa, Russia, this week for the grouping’s seventh summit, which comes at a particularly challenging time for Russian diplomacy. Precipitated by the conflict in Ukraine, Russia is barred from Group of Seven/Group of Eight processes and increasingly estranged from the West.
Thursday, 02 July 2015

BRICS Materials 2015

Leaders from the BRICS countries - Brazil, China, India, Russia, and South Africa - will meet on 8-9 July 2015 in the Russian city of Ufa. Many key developments are expected to arise from the Summit, which takes place as Russia’s relationship with the United States and its European allies worsens, while its ties to BRICS appear to have become closer.
The South African Journal of International Affairs invites article submissions and special issue proposals for our forthcoming volumes. Prospective authors may submit their articles via the SAJIA Scholar One website, detailed below. Prospective guest editors are encouraged to contact the Editor, Dr Martha Bridgman, at sajia.editor@saiia.org.za, with a concept note outlining the themed issue and proposed dates. 
Some five weeks ago I attended the BRICS (Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa) Academic Forum in Moscow as part of the South African delegation. The discussions held there provide interesting insights into the future direction of the BRICS group.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 216, April 2015
The BRICS alliance seems to have yielded limited tangible economic benefits for South Africa. Should South Africa therefore explore alternative groupings in global economic governance fora? A new set of papers has been commissioned by SAIIA on the theme 'South Africa Beyond BRICS', looking at just such a question.
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