Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter this Topic By ...

Content Types

Regions

Countries

Geopolitics (75)

President Donald Trump recently announced that the US was withdrawing from the nuclear deal with Iran, adding that any country which continues to support Iran could face US sanctions being imposed on them. This could spell trouble for South Africa due its dependency on Iranian oil.
The Report Card on International Cooperation gives a dismal C- to international efforts to mitigate the world’s most pressing problems in 2017, the same grade given for 2016.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 277, April 2018
After eight months in office, US President Donald Trump had issued no policies specifically dealing with Africa, made no senior appointments for African affairs, and showed little interest in, knowledge of, or sympathy with Africa or the future of US–Africa relations.
The COP23 summit takes place amid complex global geopolitical dynamics, with President Donald Trump having announced the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement in June. The US is currently the world’s second largest producer of carbon emissions after China and its abdication makes this and other international negotiations more challenging. Entrenched national interests have exacerbated tensions.
South Africa’s recent reversal of a ban on trade in rhinoceros horn has invigorated support for commercial farming of the product. But breeders' argument that a legal market will protect wild populations ignores how the illicit trade in wildlife products actually functions.
Dr Alex Vines of Chatham House writes that Angola’s new President João Lourenço needs to quickly focus on the country’s oil and gas future to attract fresh investment: The country should introduce credible policies to diversify its economy, but in the short term, the new president has no choice but to focus on Angola’s economic lifeblood.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Prof Tim Hoyt on 'Trends in International Terrorism and the Changing Character of Contemporary Warfare'.
Global headlines in the run-up to the 9th BRICS summit were dominated by the North Korean missile crisis and the stand-off in Doklam, high in the Himalayas, in Bhutan. The former had a direct bearing on the interests of Russia and China, as they share a border with North Korea, but positioned them on the same side in calling for a de-escalation in tensions between the US and North Korea. In the case of the latter though, it pitted two BRICS members, India and China, against each other.
In the wake of the North Korean missile fired into Japanese airspace – on the United Nation’s commemorative “International Day Against Nuclear Tests” on the 29 August - an emergency UN Security Council meeting has been called over the escalation of tensions in the Korean Peninsula.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 264, July 2017
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Prof John H. Stanfield II on 'The First 100 days of US President Donald Trump: Unpeeling the Personified Paradoxical Unknown in American and Global Politics'.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 44, May 2017
The Council of Councils (CoC) Report Card on International Cooperation evaluates multilateral efforts to address ten of the world’s most pressing global challenges, from countering transnational terrorism to advancing global health. No country can confront these issues better on its own. Combating the threats, managing the risks, and exploiting the opportunities presented by globalisation require international cooperation.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 40, March 2017
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 248, December 2016
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 247, December 2016
SAIIA Research Report No 24, November 2016 Download - English Foreign Policy Programme As the global development landscape continues to evolve, new and emerging actors – countries transitioning from being aid recipients to aid providers – are becoming increasingly visible on the global scene. Although the approaches, interests and resources of emerging donors are far from uniform, their increasing presence in global development – particularly in fragile and conflict-affected settings – could create new ways of thinking about foreign aid and contribute to more horizontal, equitable and efficient practices. The rise of these donors also poses challenges: their compliance with…
SAIIA Policy Insights No 35, September 2016
Discussions about the Global Commons often veer towards a consideration of great power engagement and commercial activities in the Arctic Circle – made possible by the effects of climate change. However, these developments are equally pertinent for the Antarctic Circle, the subject of a new SAIIA research report.
SAIIA Research Report No 23, March 2016  Download - English Foreign Policy Programme One of the most effective global governance regimes of the post-World War II period that has received very little attention over the years is the Antarctic Treaty. Driven by Cold War pressures and a failure to regulate multiple and overlapping land claims in Antarctica, the US initiated a process that led to the 1959 Antarctic Treaty (the Treaty). Of the 50 Treaty members, 29 (including South Africa) are 'consultative parties' with voting rights. The Treaty provides for inspections and stipulates, inter alia, that Antarctica should remain a…
During state visits to Kazakhstan and Indonesia in later 2013, President Xi Jinping outlined China’s vision of a ‘One Belt One Road’ – running overland from China to Eastern Europe – and a complementary Maritime Silk Road that stretches from Southeast China across the Indian Ocean to Dar es Salaam and onward around the Horn of Africa to the Mediterranean. While this vision remains under development, the engagement is intended as a multi-pronged diplomatic, economic and strategic initiative - as well as one that encourages closer cross-cultural contact – that will intensify China’s relations with Africa. Indeed this raises questions…
Page 1 of 3