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Foreign policy (312)

Most states prioritise relations with their nearest neighbours. After all, those on one’s doorstep represent the closest opportunities for trade, travel and political ties. These countries will often share geographical, cultural and ethnic connections, and have had similar historical journeys.
The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) are delighted to invite you to a Book launch on South African Foreign Policy: Identities, Intentions, and Directions with the support of the University of the Witwatersrand’s Department of Political Science and the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Ambassador of France in South Africa Mr Christophe Farnaud on 'The New France: what role in global politics?'
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 261, June 2017
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Prof John H. Stanfield II on 'The First 100 days of US President Donald Trump: Unpeeling the Personified Paradoxical Unknown in American and Global Politics'.
Volume 24.1 of the South African Journal of International Affairs sports a new cover with the updated SAIIA logo.
NeST Working Paper, March 2017 Download - English In September 2015 the Network of Southern Think Tanks (NeST) published its first working document based on the initial technical workshops held in South Africa in 2015 to develop a common conceptual and analytical framework for South–South cooperation (SSC). Following consultations with broader stakeholders throughout 2016, as well as tests of the framework through various field-based SSC case studies, Southern experts and researchers came together again a year later in Mexico City to revisit the monitoring and evaluation framework for SSC. This paper summarises the outcome of the NeST technical workshop held in Mexico in September 2016, where different country and…
On 7 May 2017, the French people spoke and elected Emmanuel Macron as their next President of the Republic. Gathering 66.06% of the votes against 33.94% for his opponent Marine Le Pen from the far-right Front National, this second round concludes an unprecedented presidential race in several respects. Beyond the victory of a newcomer in French politics, these elections marked a harsh side-lining of the two main parties – the Parti Socialiste and Les Républicains – as well as the significant rise of populist movements. While France faces a drastically altered political landscape, this election also matters for Africa.
The Council of Councils (CoC) Report Card on International Cooperation evaluates multilateral efforts to address ten of the world’s most pressing global challenges, from countering transnational terrorism to advancing global health. No country can confront these issues better on its own. Combating the threats, managing the risks, and exploiting the opportunities presented by globalisation require international cooperation.
On 29 April, President Donald J Trump reached 100 days in office as president of the United States. A controversial head of state, whose election campaign and subsequent ascension to power was met with widespread criticism and resistance, particularly from large US cities, the dust certainly has not settled by now for his administration. Instead of assuaging fears and infusing greater certainty into global affairs, the announcement that his budget intends to cut $1 billion dollars in foreign aid and diplomacy to fund various ‘America First’ projects has the rest of the world concerned about the fate of peace, security…
Visiting Bradlow Fellow
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs Vol 23.4 is now available online.
Visiting Bradlow Fellow
In a midnight press-release, President Zuma announced the results of his latest cabinet reshuffle, that predictably included the sacking of the country’s revered Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan.
SAIIA Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Ukraine's Ambassador to South Africa, Mr Yevgen Burkat on "Ukraine's price for European choice: a troubled relationship with Russia"
On 23 June 2016, voters in the United Kingdom decided that their country should leave the European Union (EU). Politics has moved quickly since that day. The UK has a new government, and a new Prime Minister, Theresa May. And preparations are underway for a negotiation which will see the UK exiting the EU.
Today’s global political landscape is characterised by a number of disruptions to the status quo. A challenge to democracy revealed itself in the form of populism, as the Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s win attested. The threat of climate change, violent extremism and mass migration continues to shake Africa. In the midst of these developments, the 28th African Union (AU) Summit, held in Addis Ababa last month, on 30-31 January 2017, was markedly different to previous meetings.
So much has been said about Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s term as Chairperson of the African Union Commission already, that regardless where one sits in estimation of her, good or bad, she certainly shook things up! Not only was she the first female AUC chair, but in a complete break with tradition, she was also the first South African. The furore surrounding her election continued throughout her tenure as her brash style proved difficult for many African diplomats to swallow.
South Africa has variously styled itself as a ‘bridge’ between the North, the global South and Africa as well as a ‘gateway’ into the continent. It also sees itself as a spokesperson for Africa, given its membership of the alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa BRICS and the G20.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 248, December 2016
The Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi will be visiting five African countries this month namely Madagascar, Zambia, Tanzania, Republic of Congo and Nigeria. This would mark the Foreign Minister's first overseas destination.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 247, December 2016
In the latest in SAIIA's series of briefings exclusively for our diplomatic members, we were pleased to host a closed diplomatic lunch discussion on 'The Gatvol Syndrome - The Year in Review, The Year Ahead', with SAIIA Chief Executive Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, and SAIIA Deputy Chairman Moeletsi Mbeki.
The 2016 elections of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were scheduled for mid-September this year, and then postponed to 27 November. But the country is still nowhere near being ready to conduct a legitimate vote, and tensions there are reaching critical levels. What should South Africa be doing to help? 'Help'. That was the one-word message I received from my contact in the DRC. It was enough to tell me everything I needed to know.
SAIIA Research Report No 24, November 2016 Download - English Foreign Policy Programme As the global development landscape continues to evolve, new and emerging actors – countries transitioning from being aid recipients to aid providers – are becoming increasingly visible on the global scene. Although the approaches, interests and resources of emerging donors are far from uniform, their increasing presence in global development – particularly in fragile and conflict-affected settings – could create new ways of thinking about foreign aid and contribute to more horizontal, equitable and efficient practices. The rise of these donors also poses challenges: their compliance with…
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