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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (369)

Tuesday, 08 July 2014

BRICS Media Briefing 2014

The South African Institute of International Affairs and the Global Economic Governance Africa (GEG-Africa) Project invited members of the press to a special media briefing on "BRICS: from Durban to Fortaleza, what to expect," on 8 July 2014.
In advance of the 2014 the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa (BRICS) Summit, an update is now available for the highly popular online resource 'BRICS and the New World Order: A Beginners Guide', produced by SAIIA and CUTS International.
New research on the trade policies of each of the BRICS countries, using the World Trade Organization (WTO) as a frame of reference, is now available for the first time in English.
BRICS’ critics were dealt a crippling blow recently when the group, which is often accused of being a talk shop, showed they are also very keen on reading. In an unusual move for an international summit, the group released an official 'BRICS Bibliography', listing key readings for those wishing to know more about the leaders, economics, history, literature, politics and sociology of each country.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 191, June 2014
Since China hosted the 2008 Beijing Olympics there has been a marked increase in the active bidding and subsequent hosting of global mega-events by countries considered ‘rising’ in international affairs. In 2010 the Commonwealth Games was hosted in India, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in China. Fast forward to 2014 and Russia held the Sochi Winter Olympics, while Brazil is set to host the upcomming 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympic Games.
SAIIA and the Mandela Institute of the University of Witwatersrand hosted a Speakers Meeting on 27 May 2014, which was addressed by Dr Olivier Blanchard, Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on ‘The Global Economic Outlook and Emerging Markets’.
The South African Institute of International Affairs and the South African Ministry of Finance invite you to a cocktail reception and discussion session on 'South Africa in the G-20 and the BRICS: In pursuit of development', with Mmakgoshi Phetla-Lekhete, Deputy Director General, National Treasury of South Africa.
On 12-13 May, SAIIA, the Ford Foundation and the Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre (NOREF), organised a public panel and an experts’ seminar on ‘Human Rights, Emerging Powers and International Governance: Civil Society Actors and Transnational Advocacy in the 21st Century’.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 182, April 2014
A fast-growing population and swift urbanisation rate is putting unprecedented pressure on Africa’s largest cities, most of them rundown by years of underinvestment and neglect. Housing an ever-increasing number of urban dwellers in this context has become a key challenge for most African governments.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 88, April 2014
China is on course to becoming more deeply involved in Africa's security landscape. While the motivation behind Chinese involvement remains primarily economic, the growing exposure of its interests to the vagaries of African politics and pressures to demonstrate greater global activism are bringing about a reconsideration of Beijing's approach to the continent.
2013 was a difficult year for the five BRICS countries. China and Brazil faced slowing growth, South Africa and India were hit by currency instability, and concern over Russia’s governance deepened (before recent events in the Ukraine pitched them into all-out crisis). As doubts have mounted, investors have increasingly turned back to traditional investment destinations like the United States and Europe, as well as to new formations like the MINTs (Mexico, India, Nigeria and Turkey).
As the sixth BRICS head of state summit approaches, it is clear that the grouping’s agenda is far from static. The BRICS Policy Center (BPC) and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) hosted a seminar to address some of the inter-BRICS and intra-BRICS dynamics relevant to the consolidation of the grouping as a whole.
This year’s Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa (BRICS) Summit will be held in July in Fortaleza, Brazil. Experts from the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) will be in Brazil from Wednesday 12 March 2014 for a number of events related to the upcoming Summit.
In little over a decade Brazil has orbited from the periphery to the core of the international system. In 2014, the year that Brazil is to host the World Cup and the Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa (BRICS) summit, three new SAIIA publications provide insights into this rising power.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 170, December 2014
Go to any conference in the world and say ‘Doha Development Agenda’, and the room is likely to empty. But not in China. Recently I was impressed with the degree of interest amongst China’s trade policy elite in the future of the World Trade Organization (WTO), and the global trading system of which it is a part.
SAIIA recently held a two-day meeting called "BRICS and Africa: A Partnership for Sustainable Development." Our Brazilian partners from the BRICS Policy Centre joined the discussions on the political, economic and security issues related to Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa or the BRICS group of emerging countries. We used the opportunity to speak to Paulo Esteves, the General Supervisor at Brazil’s BRICS Policy Centre and Head of the International Relations Institute at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) and the BRICS Policy Center (BPC) in Brazil hosted a conference on ‘BRICS and Africa – A Partnership for Sustainable Development?’. Presentations and other materials are available here.
Two new books on the emergence of the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) grouping will come under the spotlight during SAIIA’s two-day conference on ‘BRICS and Africa: A partnership for Development’ on Wednesday, 13 November 2013. A special discussion at the conference will explore the impact of this emerging powers bloc on the current global political and economic systems.
On 21 to 22 October, SAIIA's chief executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, and researcher, Yu-Shan Wu, participated in the launch of the Think Tank 10 + 10 Partnership Plan in Beijing. This partnership plan evolved out of the China-Africa Think Tanks Forum (CATTF), which had been established in 2011 by Zhejiang Normal University.
Africa’s rise over the past decade has worked like a magnet, attracting to the continent new and old partners alike. While the mounting interest in the continent by emerging powers such as China, India and Brazil, and traditional partners such as the United States (US) and the European Union (EU), has inspired a growing stream of research and media attention, one erstwhile power remains conspicuously absent in the analysis: Russia.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 157, September 2013