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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (369)

SAIIA Policy Insights No 9, March 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 8, March 2015
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 131, March 2015
Under the auspices of the Network of Southern Think-Tanks (NeST), the South African Institute of International Affairs in partnership with Oxfam held a multi-stakeholder policy dialogue on 'Emerging Partners in Africa’s Development: Measuring the impact of South-South Cooperation' in Midrand on 03 March 2015.
Global energy consumption will increase rapidly in the next decade. The current core energy production sites in the world economy are unlikely to be able to supply this increasing demand. A new book, containing chapters from SAIIA researchers Dr Ana Alves and Dr Agathe Maupin, looks at Sub-Saharan Africa's potential energy resources in this light.
Saturday, 24 January 2015

Factsheet: China-Africa Relations

China-Africa ties have expanded beyond trade and investment in extractive industries to engagement in telecommunications, infrastructure, manufacturing, finance, media, agriculture and peace and security issues.
Happy new year to all our partners and friends! The year that has gone was characterised by South Africa’s fifth democratic elections, the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, and the growing power of Boko Haram and other radical Islamist groups in Africa. Across other parts of the world, old fissures seemed to re-emerge; whether in Europe’s growing right-wing wave, or in Ukraine and in the Middle East.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 205, November 2014
Q&A with Dr. Zhang Chun of the Shanghai Institute of International Studies and Dr. Abiodun Alao of King’s College London.The scholarly and policy focus on China in Africa is beginning to move beyond the examination of the macro-trends to a more nuanced emphasis on sectoral and bilateral country studies.
The Department of Political Sciences and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) are holding a conference on 'Alliances Beyond BRICS: South Africa’s role in global economic governance.'
South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma will be making his second state visit to China between 4 and 5 December 2014. China-South Africa relations have steadily progressed at the bilateral level and beyond, since official relations were established in 1998 - and have been further upgraded to a Comprehensive Strategic Partnership since 2010.
The latest issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs (Volume 21.3) is now available online, featuring articles on BRICS co-operation across the South Atlantic, collaboration by BRICS corporates in Africa, the nuclear security discourse, the question of Islamic Nationalism in Al Shabaab, ANC foreign policymaking under Mbeki and the question of conflict-free diamonds under the Kimberly process.
In July 2014, the BRICS grouping (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), announced the creation of a new, US$100 billion New Development Bank to lend money to developing nations for investments. There is much speculation about the role the Bank might play, and the motivations of the BRICS members in establishing it.
On 24 November 2014, the Graduate School of Business at the University of Cape Town and the South African Institute of International Affairs, hosted a conference on 'Development Banks of the Developing World: Regional Roles, Governance and Sustainability.'
The announcement of a joint agreement between the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and Hebei Iron and Steel Group to open a steel mill in Phalaborwa could signal a new stage in the longstanding relationship between South Africa and China. Financed in part by the China Africa Development Fund, the deal reportedly involves the Chinese company taking a 51% share in the joint venture and building a processing plant that will go beyond the mere extraction of resources for export and generate local employment.
Since the establishment of formal diplomatic ties in 1998, relations between South Africa, a leading economy on the African continent, and China, the largest developing country in the world, have grown steadily. Sharing a similar global vision, the two emerging countries are working towards closer strategic co-operation that takes account of the structure of bilateral economic ties, domestic diversity and overlapping interests.
South Africa, a leading economy on the African continent, and China, the largest developing country in the world, have forged a unique partnership. Operating at bilateral, continental and multilateral levels, the governments are actively striving to realise the comprehensive strategic partnership envisaged in 2010.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 199, August 2014
Hardly a multilateral meeting goes by without its attendees committing themselves to the promotion of peace and security across the globe. The Sixth BRICS Summit, hosted from 14-16 July in Brazil, was no exception. BRICS member states (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) have, time and again, declared their commitment to 'building a harmonious world of lasting peace and common prosperity', yet the various Summit declarations are sketchy at best on how these five countries intend to go about achieving this objective.
A country’s international economic agenda is invariably shaped by its domestic constraints and socio-economic development objectives. The BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) states are no exception.
After five years of introspection and institution building, the sixth BRICS summit offers an opportunity for the group to focus on its relations with the rest of the world. Relations with the Group of 7 (G-7) are particularly contentious. Russia's exclusion from the G-8 following the crisis in Crimea has moved the BRICS to the centre stage in Russian foreign policy thinking, and risks pulling the group onto an opposition footing with the West.
China’s rising position in African affairs, from that of quiescence to becoming a key economic actor on the continent, is now a well-recognized fact. A new book co-edited by SAIIA's Chris Alden and the IESE's Sérgio Chichava takes an in-depth look at China's relationship with Mozambique.
The BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) were brought together by their investment returns and growth potential, but for the group to act they must find some common purpose.
Wednesday, 09 July 2014

BRICS 2014 Summit

As the BRICS meet in Fortaleza, Brazil from 14-16 July 2014, attention is once again on the group’s efforts to establish two new financial institutions: the New Development Bank and the Contingent Reserve Arrangement. Negotiations are underway on both and, while it remains uncertain that they will be officially launched in Fortaleza, substantial progress is expected to be announced at the summit.
The emergence of the BRICS (Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa) grouping coincided with the notion of an ‘Africa Rising’, a term coined following Africa's growing economic prosperity. The rise of BRICS also overlapped with their increased involvement in Africa.
In advance of the sixth annual BRICS Heads of State Summit, to be held in Fortaleza, Brazil from 14-16 July 2014, SAIIA has compiled an engaging range of new materials about the grouping's past, present and future.
As the BRICS meet in Fortaleza, Brazil from 14-16 July 2014, attention is once again on the group’s efforts to establish two new financial institutions: the New Development Bank and the Contingent Reserve Arrangement. Negotiations are underway on both and, while it remains uncertain that they will be officially launched in Fortaleza, substantial progress is expected to be announced at the summit.