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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (367)

SAIIA Occasional Paper No 223, October 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 29, November 2015
Chinese economic activities in Africa have gained increased visibility in parallel to the recent acceleration of Sino-African relations. But, as two case studies in a new paper illustrate, Chinese operations in Africa are not homogenous and engage with their respective host environments in dynamic ways.
Third India Africa Forum Summit  from 26-29 October 2015 in New Delhi, India. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Dear Editors,  The Third India Africa Forum Summit is taking place from 26-29 October 2015 in New Delhi, India this week.SAIIA has put together a package of articles, videos, and papers on India-Africa relations. The experts and resources below can assist journalists and editors as they prepare to cover the event.
SAIIA has just released a new working paper and short analysis on India-Africa relations under Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
SAIIA launched the book 'Institutional Architecture & Development: Responses from Emerging Powers' on 4 September 2015.
For the outside visitor, whether first-timer or a more regular one, urban China repeatedly produces the same effect: surprise, then fascination, often followed by disbelief. From sizeable motorways packed with bumper-to-bumper traffic, to cranes populating the skyline with innumerable iterations of high-rise buildings, its cities are a direct reflection of China’s rapid (and on-going) development path. Large metropolises such as Beijing, Shanghai, or Guangzhou are not only engines of growth but also seen as showpieces of modernity where processes of destruction and construction are simultaneously underway.
Who are South Africa’s true partners in the international arena – the BRICS countries, Europe, the USA? Who does South Africa trade with most? Who is most involved in development and humanitarian action in South Africa and Africa? Where do our best strategic interests lie? And what does the future hold?
While the BRICS’ initial focus when it was established in 2009 was on improving global economic governance in response to the 2008 financial crisis, over the last seven years BRICS co-operation and dialogue has moved into politico-security areas.  
During state visits to Kazakhstan and Indonesia in later 2013, President Xi Jinping outlined China’s vision of a ‘One Belt One Road’ – running overland from China to Eastern Europe – and a complementary Maritime Silk Road that stretches from Southeast China across the Indian Ocean to Dar es Salaam and onward around the Horn of Africa to the Mediterranean. While this vision remains under development, the engagement is intended as a multi-pronged diplomatic, economic and strategic initiative - as well as one that encourages closer cross-cultural contact – that will intensify China’s relations with Africa. Indeed this raises questions…
Heads of state of the BRICS countries will gather in Ufa, Russia, this week for the grouping’s seventh summit, which comes at a particularly challenging time for Russian diplomacy. Precipitated by the conflict in Ukraine, Russia is barred from Group of Seven/Group of Eight processes and increasingly estranged from the West.
Reflecting the broadening of the BRICS agenda since the grouping was formed in 2009, the first ever meeting of BRICS environment ministers was held in Russia in April 2015. The ministers agreed to:
Thursday, 02 July 2015

BRICS Materials 2015

Leaders from the BRICS countries - Brazil, China, India, Russia, and South Africa - will meet on 8-9 July 2015 in the Russian city of Ufa. Many key developments are expected to arise from the Summit, which takes place as Russia’s relationship with the United States and its European allies worsens, while its ties to BRICS appear to have become closer.
The South African Journal of International Affairs invites article submissions and special issue proposals for our forthcoming volumes. Prospective authors may submit their articles via the SAJIA Scholar One website, detailed below. Prospective guest editors are encouraged to contact the Editor, Dr Martha Bridgman, at sajia.editor@saiia.org.za, with a concept note outlining the themed issue and proposed dates. 
Some five weeks ago I attended the BRICS (Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa) Academic Forum in Moscow as part of the South African delegation. The discussions held there provide interesting insights into the future direction of the BRICS group.
SAIIA today hosted the Korean Foreign Ministry, to discuss the outcomes of the Fifth MIKTA (Mexico, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Turkey and Australia) Foreign Ministers’ Meeting held in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, on 22 May 2015.
The BRICS (Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa) Academic Forum in Moscow took place from 21-23 May 2015. SAIIA's chief executive Elizabeth Sidiropoulos was invited to take part as a member of the South African delegation.
The BRICS alliance seems to have yielded limited tangible economic benefits for South Africa. Should South Africa therefore explore alternative groupings in global economic governance fora? A new set of papers has been commissioned by SAIIA on the theme 'South Africa Beyond BRICS', looking at just such a question.
This year is seen as an important step towards implementing Africa’s future development plans. With the MDGs drawing to a close, the post-2015 development agenda for the continent is framed around Agenda 2063.
How are states employing cultural diplomacy in an increasingly interconnected world in shaping understanding between societies while promoting preferential co-operation between nations? Observers of China-South Africa relations will have noticed the increasing reference to the ‘China Year in South Africa’ by officials on both sides.
A new set of papers has just been released, looking at BRICS and Development Finance Institutions.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 9, March 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 8, March 2015