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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (371)

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 56, March 2010
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 55, February 2010
China increasingly is playing a crucial role in African economies. Two-way trade between China and Africa exceeded U.S. $106 billion in 2008 and Beijing is the leading trading partner with South Africa, the continent’s largest economy.
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 16, February 2010
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 15, February 2010
Wednesday, 02 December 2009

Thematic Work: IBSA

SAIIA Publications: An Overview of Brazilian Foreign Policy in the 21st Centuryby Monica HirstSAIIA Policy Briefing, No.6, November 2009 Biofuel Technology Transfer in IBSA: Lessons for South Africa and Brazilby Lyal White & Tatiana Cyro CostaSAIIA Policy Briefing, No.7, November 2009 IBSA Six Years On: Co-operation in a New Global Orderby Lyal WhiteSAIIA Policy Briefing, No.8, November 2009 Brazil as a Regional and Emerging Global Powerby Matias SpektorSAIIA Policy Briefing, No.9, November 2009 IBSA Publications: Chevallier, R, ‘The South Africa Perspective of IBSA’. FRIDE’s Europe-Latin America Dialogue Forum. 5 November 2007. Chevallier, von Drafenfels and Stamm, ‘India-Brazil-South Africa (IBSA) –…
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 6, November 2009
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 8, November 2009
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 9, November 2009
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 11, November 2009
As originally published in Growth Magazine, Issue 5, 2009www.growth.co.za There is a sudden rush by outside countries to Africa and the last few months saw the powerful · China, Russia and United States - competing for entrance to the continent. Not only the three most influential nations, but also India, the European Union, South Korea, Turkey and Brazil see Africa as important. This sudden scramble for Africa is meant to access its economic resources, writes Tom Wheeler.
As originally published in Growth Magazine, Issue 4, 2009www.growth.co.za In a short period of less than a month, Russia has sought to as­sert its role in international forums as a leading player in a multipolar world. This objective comes from the nationalistic view of its con­temporary history initiated by Vladimir Pu­tin, and holds that a unipolar world should no longer be dominated by a single hyper­power, the United States.
China’s rise to global prominence, founded on its economic achievements and its growing role in Africa, has inspired debate across the continent. While much of the discussion has focused on the implications of China’s presence in Africa, especially as it relates to traditional Western interests, very little attention has been given to the potential opportunities that it may present to enhance African development.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 44, October 2009
The second Africa South America summit, hosted by President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela formed the third part of a triangle of events, starting with the General Debate at the opening of the 64th Session of the UN General Assembly in New York, followed immediately by the third summit of the G20 Financial in Pittsburgh.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 42, September 2009
The founding of the Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) in 2000 marked the beginning of a thriving phase in China–Africa relations.  Today, China is Africa’s second largest trading partner, a second source of FDI and South Africa’s largest trading partner.  In November 2009, the fourth FOCAC ministerial meeting is set to take place in Egypt.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 39, August 2009 (English)
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 39, August 2009 (French)
Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) has experienced increasing competition from Chinese manufactured exports particularly in the clothing and textiles industry. In most SSA countries including South Africa (SA), the clothing and textiles industry developed under import substitution policies and was highly protected. The quota market access offered by developed countries for four decades under the Multi Fibre Agreement (MFA) that lasted until the end of 2004 also influenced the development of the industry. Foreign direct investment (FDI) into the African industry was primarily from Asia (notably Taiwan and China) and motivated by the need to diversify export platforms, or “quota hopping”.…
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 38, July 2009
The South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to a China Study Group Meeting to be addressed by Lucy Corkin on China and Angola: Oil, money, roads and beyond?Venue: Jan Smuts House
In a short period of less than a month, Russia has sought to assert its role in international forums as a leading player in a multipolar world. This objective is informed by the nationalistic view of its contemporary history initiated by Vladimir Putin, and holds that a unipolar world should no longer be dominated by a single hyper-power, the United States.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 36, July 2009 (English)
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 33, May 2009