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Emerging Powers, BRICS and Africa (353)

Africa’s infrastructure financing deficit, estimated to be $100 billion a year, remains persistently large. The resulting lack of investment in energy, transport and water infrastructure on the continent presents a significant barrier to economic growth and development.
Nearly nine months ago the third India-Africa Forum Summit, and the first that included all African states, was held with much fanfare in Delhi. There, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a range of measures, including extending lines of credit to African nations of up to $10 billion over the next five years, additional grant assistance of $600 million, and a commitment to help train more African peacekeepers in Africa and India.
SAIIA today held a diplomatic briefing, addressed by Elizabeth Sidiropoulos and Cyril Prinsloo, on 'The Geopolitics of the 'new normal': South Africa in the BRICS 5 years on.'
On 18 March 2016, SAIIA and the Embassy of Japan cordially hosted two briefings, on 'The New Development Bank and its place in the Development Finance Sector in Africa: Perspectives,' and 'The potential for the development of regional value chains in the Automotive Sector in SADC: Lessons from the ASEAN Experience.'
The 2014 Summit of the BRICS grouping in Fortaleza saw the launch of the New Development Bank, a new international development finance institution. The Bank’s purpose is to: ‘mobilise resources for infrastructure and sustainable development projects in BRICS and other emerging economies and developing countries, complementing the existing efforts of multilateral and regional financial institutions for global growth and development’.
A special issue of the South African Journal of International Affairs, entitled ‘South Africa’s world: Perspectives on diplomacy, international political economy and international law’, is now available online (Volume 22.4).
Three years of international research in Europe and the BICS countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) has resulted in a new book, 'Challenges of European External Energy Governance with Emerging Powers'. The chapter 'South Africa-EU energy governance: tales of path dependency, regional power, and decarbonisation' was authored by SAIIA Senior Researcher, Dr Agathe Maupin.
A webcast is available of the special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience,' held on 3 December 2015 by SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP).
On 3 December 2015, SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP) hosted a special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience.'
The upcoming Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) summit in South Africa, the sixth gathering since 2000 and only the second to be held at heads of state level, comes at a time of unprecedented Chinese activism across the globe.
In the context of a ‘normalising’ Chinese economy, that seeks to move from a manufacturing-centred economy to one driven by consumption and services, there are obviously concerns about the impact on Africa through a decrease in commodity exports (and income) to China. Yet such shifts also signal opportunity and perhaps changes in China’s approach towards the continent, to include ‘softer’ issues - like closer public interaction.
Fifteen years after its inception, the sixth Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) will be held in Johannesburg on December 4-5 under the theme, ‘Africa-China Progressing Together: Win-Win Cooperation for Common Development’. Launched in October 2000 in Beijing as a tri-annual collective dialogue platform for co-operation between China and Africa, FOCAC is a signal of the dynamic and expanding nature of China-Africa relations. 
SAIIA invites members of the media to our special briefing on the sixth Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), 'FOCAC VI : More of the same or signs of change?' on 19 November 2015.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 223, October 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 29, November 2015
Chinese economic activities in Africa have gained increased visibility in parallel to the recent acceleration of Sino-African relations. But, as two case studies in a new paper illustrate, Chinese operations in Africa are not homogenous and engage with their respective host environments in dynamic ways.
Third India Africa Forum Summit  from 26-29 October 2015 in New Delhi, India. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Dear Editors,  The Third India Africa Forum Summit is taking place from 26-29 October 2015 in New Delhi, India this week.SAIIA has put together a package of articles, videos, and papers on India-Africa relations. The experts and resources below can assist journalists and editors as they prepare to cover the event.
SAIIA has just released a new working paper and short analysis on India-Africa relations under Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
SAIIA launched the book 'Institutional Architecture & Development: Responses from Emerging Powers' on 4 September 2015.
For the outside visitor, whether first-timer or a more regular one, urban China repeatedly produces the same effect: surprise, then fascination, often followed by disbelief. From sizeable motorways packed with bumper-to-bumper traffic, to cranes populating the skyline with innumerable iterations of high-rise buildings, its cities are a direct reflection of China’s rapid (and on-going) development path. Large metropolises such as Beijing, Shanghai, or Guangzhou are not only engines of growth but also seen as showpieces of modernity where processes of destruction and construction are simultaneously underway.
Who are South Africa’s true partners in the international arena – the BRICS countries, Europe, the USA? Who does South Africa trade with most? Who is most involved in development and humanitarian action in South Africa and Africa? Where do our best strategic interests lie? And what does the future hold?
While the BRICS’ initial focus when it was established in 2009 was on improving global economic governance in response to the 2008 financial crisis, over the last seven years BRICS co-operation and dialogue has moved into politico-security areas.  
During state visits to Kazakhstan and Indonesia in later 2013, President Xi Jinping outlined China’s vision of a ‘One Belt One Road’ – running overland from China to Eastern Europe – and a complementary Maritime Silk Road that stretches from Southeast China across the Indian Ocean to Dar es Salaam and onward around the Horn of Africa to the Mediterranean. While this vision remains under development, the engagement is intended as a multi-pronged diplomatic, economic and strategic initiative - as well as one that encourages closer cross-cultural contact – that will intensify China’s relations with Africa. Indeed this raises questions…
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