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Climate Change and the Environment (193)

The long-awaited Copenhagen summit on climate change gave to the world a broad political agreement, but without any teeth. Meanwhile concerns over the climate change agenda finding its way into the multilateral trading system are growing, at a time when the trading system is struggling to find its own feet. South Africa’s economy, and by extension Southern Africa’s economy, is based on resource production and to some extent beneficiation, in turn dependent on cheap energy. Its international visibility — not least in climate change negotiations — means that it may be in line for imposition of trade policy measures on…
Tuesday, 15 June 2010

Climate Change: Events

Climate Change and Challenges for Developing Economies 21 April 2010 Event Details Climate Change and Trade: The Challenges for Southern Africa 26-27 October 2009 Event Details Africa Trade and Climate Dialogue 7-8 May 2009 Event Details The Stern Review: Economics of Climate Change 14 March 2007 Event Details
Occasional Papers Mainstreaming climate change and development cooperation in Africaby Romy Chevallier Earthscan’s Climate change and Development special edition: Adaptation to Climate Change in Southern Africa: New Boundaries for Development. Volume 2. Issue 2. April 2010 Facing the global challenges of climate change: the case of EU-Africa cooperationby Romy Chevallier Beyond Development Aid: EU-Africa political dialogue on global issues of common concern.(pg 89) Europe-Africa Policy Research Network. November 2010   The Challenges of Carbon Mitigation and Implications for South Africa in the post–2012 Contextby Auriel NiemackSouth African Yearbook of International Affairs 2008/2009. Johannesburg SAIIA. (pg 67 - 84)   Addressing…
South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to a Round Table Discussion to be addressed by Dr Haifeng Wang, Senior Fellow and Director, Institute for International Economic Research under the National Development and Reform Commission, China on "Climate Change and Challenges for Developing Economies: China's Perspective " Date:        Wednesday 21 April 2010Time:       10:15 for 10:30 to conclude by 12:30 and followed by a light lunchVenue:     Jan Smuts House, East Campus, University of Witwatersrand
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Tanja Hichert speaking on 'Driving Forces and Trends Shaping the Future of Southern Africa's Agriculture' at 5:00 for 5:30 pm
Annual Statement of the National Chairman, Mr Fred T Phaswana,  to the National Council of the South African Institute of International Affairs. 18 March 2010 In the wake of the global financial crisis and economic recession, the past year has been one of international consolidation and reconfiguration. An unprecedented meltdown was only prevented by judicious intervention by governments in the major financial capitals of the United States and Europe. Most notably, however, with the consultation and co-operation of key emerging powers. While we might never know how close we came to a global financial catastrophe, it is now increasingly apparent…
This week’s Copenhagen summit on climate change is unlikely to deliver much beyond a broad framework agreement, leaving many details to be worked out in the build-up to the expiration of the Kyoto Protocol in 2012.
COP 15, COPENHAGEN 2009 The fifteenth United Nations Conference on Climate Change has been concluded.  The accord coming out of the conference, however, falls well short of a legally-binding treaty, and includes no emissions reduction targets and no time-line for concluding a legally-binding deal.  Another round of climate talks is scheduled for November 2010 in Mexico, where negotiators will continue to work towards a treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocol.
Climate Change and Trade: the Challenges for Southern Africa Dates: 26-27 October, 2009 Venue: Southern Sun Hotel, Beatrix Street, Pretoria
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 47, October 2009
Climate change, in part a result of rising greenhouse gas emissions, is seen as the most pressing environmental problem of our time. The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) marks the first step towards an international response to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. As the Kyoto Protocol comes up for review in 2012, negotiations towards the formulation of its successor are underway and will culminate in a Conference of Parties (COP) meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009 with a view to agree on a more ambitious, inclusive and effective international response.
"Desertec" soll Europa mit Solarstrom aus Afrika versorgen. Ein Fortschritt im Kampf gegen den Klimawandel ist das Projekt nur, wenn auch die Entwicklungsländer einbezogen werden.
Symbolbild Gastkolumne vom Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)"Desertec" soll Europa mit Solarstrom aus Afrika versorgen. Eine Chance im Kampf gegen den Klimawandel ist das Projekt nur, wenn auch Entwicklungsländer einbezogen werden, meinen Romy Chevalier und Matthias Ruchser.
SAIIA in collaboration with the  International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) organized a Regional Trade and Climate Change Consultation in Johannesburg, South Africa, on May 7-8, 2009. The objectives of the regional consultation were to explore the issues at the interface of trade and climate change of concern and interests to African countries and identify a positive agenda able to contribute to engagement of African countries in the process of negotiations towards the UNFCCC Copenhagen summit in December.
SAIIA in collaboration with the  International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) organized a Regional Trade and Climate Change Consultation in Johannesburg, South Africa, on May 7-8, 2009. The objectives of the regional consultation were to explore the issues at the interface of trade and climate change of concern and interests to African countries and identify a positive agenda able to contribute to engagement of African countries in the process of negotiations towards the UNFCCC Copenhagen summit in December.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (Western Cape) invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Professor Geoff Brundrit on "The Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Great Harbour Cities of Africa - Alexandria, Lagos and Cape Town"
SAIIA’s Western Cape Branch will be hosting a public seminar to be addressed by Professor Geoff Brundrit on ‘The Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Great Harbour Cities of Africa - Alexandria, Lagos and Cape Town.’
The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on 30 June was one year short of its 50th anniversary of independence. In the current political and economic context, this year’s mood was reflective rather than celebratory.  The anniversary day was therefore an opportune time for the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA)’s Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme (GARP) to hold a roundtable discussion on the DRC. Attended by members of the governmental, diplomatic, academic, policy-making and business community, the event was aptly titled “Reviewing the Giant” and focused on the mining and forestry sectors.
Parktown High School for Girls took honours in the inaugural SAIIA Schools Environmental Sustainability Project, held at Jan Smuts House on 7 March. This project aimed to introduce a new generation of thinkers to the global debate on climate change.   
In Africa, as in the rest of the world, discussions are heating up in preparation for international climate change negotiations, to culminate in Copenhagen at the end of the year 
The Schools' Environmental Sustainability Project is the first of its kind to be hosted by SAIIA and aims to introduce a new generation of thinkers to the global debate on climate change.  As part of the 75th Anniversary Programme, the project was run with the financial assistance of the First Rand Foundation.
Tuesday, 12 August 2008

China in Africa Policy Briefs

SAIIA's China in Africa Policy Briefs, published in 2008, are concise summaries of contemporary issues in Sino-African relations.  Topics covered include China's environmental footprint, China's involvement with the United Nations Security Council, and China's preferential trade policy towards Africa.
A determined entrepreneur turns an arid landscape into a burgeoning vineyard SUN-scorched and starved of rain, Namibia's endless desert and scrubland is an unforgiving place for a determined farmer with a dream. Only 2% of the country receives enough rain to grow crops. Irrigation from rivers is possible only along a few border rivers in the far north and south and borehole irrigation is prohibitively expensive.
ceAfrica, September 2005EMILY Tyler, who handles climate project transactions for SouthSouthNorth, a development organisation specialising in CDM projects with headquarters in Cape Town, says that the market structure of the CDM, combined with the current low price of carbon, makes it difficult for smaller sustainable development projects to attract funding. The Kuyasa Housing CDM Project, run jointly with the City of Cape Town, recently became the first project in Africa to be registered with the CDM Executive Board. The project neatly satisfies the criteria of the CDM, and even won third prize in April 2004 at the PointCarbon 'Carbon Insights'…
Thursday, 24 April 2008

The Chicago Climate

eAfrica, September 2005THE Kyoto Protocol may be the first global environmental agreement, but it isn't the first attempt at creating a market for hot air. The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), a voluntary big-business initiative to curb emissions, pioneered by 28 large American corporations such as Ford and DuPont, opened in early 2003. The scheme involves participants making legally binding pledges to reduce their emissions, and provides for trade between members, along the same lines as Kyoto, to achieve this.
Thursday, 24 April 2008

What is Carbon Trading?

eAfrica, September 2005UNDER the Kyoto Protocol, each industrialised country is assigned a legally-binding greenhouse emissions quota, which it must meet or face penalties. To make the process efficient, the treaty allows polluters who fail to curb their pollution sufficiently to purchase CERs from another company that produces a surplus - or from a project in the developing world that earns CERs under the Clean Development Mechanism of the treaty.
eAfrica, September 2005Innovative countries are starting to finance new projects through the Kyoto treaty, which allows industrialised nations to cut emissions by paying for pollution reduction in the South.
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