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African Institutions (386)

This year is seen as an important step towards implementing Africa’s future development plans. With the MDGs drawing to a close, the post-2015 development agenda for the continent is framed around Agenda 2063.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 212, March 2015
The Sharpeville Massacre is deeply engrained in the pages of South African history. The events of 21 March 1960 are now commemorated on Human Rights Day.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 130, March 2015
The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) – the continent’s governance assessment and monitoring tool – turns 12 on 9 March 2015. This anniversary commemorates the meeting in Abuja, Nigeria in 2003 that officially inaugurated the APRM, and saw the voluntary accession of the first member states.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 129, March 2015
The leaders of the African continent declared their resolve to follow through on their 'Agenda 2063' vision at the 24th African Union (AU) Summit held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia last month.
The African Union’s emerging 50-year development plan, Agenda 2063, aims to cap a century of the organisation’s work with a thoroughly transformed continent. A central theme is the integration of the AU’s 54 member states, opening up borders, merging markets and speaking with a common voice in global fora.
SAIIA Report No 18, January 2015  Download - English (401.27 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeRegional integration has long been recognised as an important vehicle for Africa’s development; currently, the African Union (AU) officially intends achieving a continent-wide common market by 2023 and a currency union by 2018. One of the goals of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the continent’s indigenous governance assessment system, is to promote regional integration. The enquiries it has made into the integration attempts and experiences of the 19 countries that have undergone review so far provide valuable new insights.
Africa may be rising, but its success is primarily measured by economic growth and development, while discourse on democratisation is far less prominent than at the onset of the new millennium. At the same time, many African states are forging ever-deeper ties with emerging powers that seem to place little value on democracy and human rights.
On Friday 30 January, Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe was appointed the new chair of the African Union. His appointment was made during the annual two-day heads of state summit at the African Union's headquarters in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 209, January 2015
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 123, January 2015
Happy new year to all our partners and friends! The year that has gone was characterised by South Africa’s fifth democratic elections, the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, and the growing power of Boko Haram and other radical Islamist groups in Africa. Across other parts of the world, old fissures seemed to re-emerge; whether in Europe’s growing right-wing wave, or in Ukraine and in the Middle East.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 120, December 2014
A new report on Corporate Governance in Southern Africa by the South African Institute of International Affairs was launched this week in both Zambia and South Africa.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 114, November 2014
Does being an active member of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the instrument adopted by the African Union to improve the quality of governance across the continent, help a country improve its rankings in the Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG)?
SAIIA Report No 17, August 2014 Download - English (642.1 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeThe Africa Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) is an initiative aimed at fostering good governance and development in its participating states. As part of its multi-pronged inquiry, it devotes a great deal of attention to investigating corporate governance on the continent. However, thus far corporate governance has attracted less attention than any other area of the APRM.
The growth of the private sector is recognised as crucial to unlock economic growth in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). But there are numerous barriers to trade in the region. Supported by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), SAIIA has undertaken research to identify the top 10 barriers to doing business in the SADC region.
Sub-Saharan Africa is decidedly heterogeneous when it comes to the interests and normative underpinnings that frame each country's interpretation of the notion of security, not to mention the capacity and willingness of individual African states to address the myriad forms of insecurity and vulnerability.
On 19 September 2014, the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) in partnership with the Global Public Policy Institute (GPPi) hosted a policy dialogue on ‘Protecting Civilians in Armed Conflict: Views from the South’.
The existence of a vibrant civil society is often seen as an important element of a democratic state. Yet what is civil society and what does it need to do to contribute meaningfully and enhance democratic elements of the country’s politics and governance practices?
The South African Institute of International Affairs was proud to host a public lecture with Prominent Ghanaian academic Professor SKB Asante and Ambassador Ashraf Rashed, deputy chairperson of the APRM Panel of Eminent Persons, on 8 September 2014. A video interview with the experts present is now available.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 198, August 2014
The heads of state and government of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) members are ensconced in the resort town of Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. This is for the annual summit of the regional economic community (17-18 August) that includes countries from as far north as Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).