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African Institutions (399)

SAIIA Policy Insights No 32, June 2016 
African countries seem to be forever undergoing assessments and evaluations. Many stem from the governments of international development partners who have poured money into a plethora of projects, programmes and plans, and want to know what has worked and why. Others are commissioned by international organisations such as the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund that have likewise invested in development or infrastructure initiatives. Credit rating agencies also put African state’s political economies under their microscopes to pronounce on the investment climate.
SAIIA, in partnership with the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation and the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria, cordially invites you to the launch of 'African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t’, edited by Steven Gruzd and Yarik Turianskyi.
Governance and accountability are vital elements in any society. Governance refers to the rules, procedures and institutions by which a state conducts its affairs. Accountability creates channels of communication and trust between a government and its citizens, as well as systems for holding officials responsible for their actions and policies.  In short, it is how a country is run and how the government and the governed interact with each other.
Nearly 26 years after he was forced out of power, former Chadian president Hissène Habré has been found guilty of crimes against humanity, torture (including sexual violence) and crimes of war committed under his rule from 1982 to 1990. He has been condemned to life imprisonment by the judges of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EACs), a court specially created by Senegal upon the request of the African Union (AU). This was the first trial of its kind on the continent and years of lobbying were necessary to convince the AU and Senegal to proceed with it. In pushing Africa to…
‘I dream of the realisation of the unity of Africa, whereby its leaders combine in their effort to solve the problems of this continent.’ - Nelson Mandela
On 17-18 May, SAIIA and the Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa (EISA) together held a regional civil society conference, ‘#ReviveAPRM: Where to Next for Civil Society?’ in Nairobi, Kenya.
SAIIA cordially invites you to a SAIIA Roundtable on ‘The Habré Trial: African Justice in Action?’
On 18 March 2016, SAIIA and the Embassy of Japan cordially hosted two briefings, on 'The New Development Bank and its place in the Development Finance Sector in Africa: Perspectives,' and 'The potential for the development of regional value chains in the Automotive Sector in SADC: Lessons from the ASEAN Experience.'
SAIIA Research Report No 22, February 2016 Download - English Governance and APRM Programme Africa’s turn to electoral democracy over the past three decades has rightly been hailed as a significant achievement, but it has not rid the continent of restrictive and authoritarian governance impulses. This report attempts to interrogate the concept of ‘freedom’ and how it is faring in Africa. To do so, it conceptualises freedom in terms of ‘constitutional liberalism’, and discusses this conceptualisation in relation to two broad themes: constitutionalism and civil liberties.
On 9 March, the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) turns 13. ‘APRM Day’ commemorates the formal launch of Africa’s innovative governance monitoring and assessment tool in Abuja, Nigeria in 2003.
Thursday, 04 February 2016

Global Go To Think Tank Survey 2015

In his analysis of the most recent Global Go To Think Tank Survey, Professor Jim McGann of the University of Pennsylvania points to two key factors that can promote or inhibit the success of think tanks.
On 29 January 2016, a group of Africa’s Heads of State and Government met in Addis Ababa to determine the fate of one of the AU’s most daring initiatives. At stake was the future relevance of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).
The African Union (AU) is convening its January 2016 summit under the guiding theme: ‘African year of human rights with a particular focus on the rights of Women’. Notwithstanding the themes, which in part focus the deliberations at the Summit, the headlines and the pressing issues facing the continent will always steal the thunder from these lofty themes. This current summit is no different.
On Thursday, 21 January 2016 SAIIA will host launch of the World Bank publication, 'Factory Southern Africa? SACU in Global Value Chains'. The publication is the result of an extensive collaborative effort across many organisations and experts that have contributed within their fields of expertise.
A new book by SAIIA, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t?, focuses on political and social developments to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
On 24 November 2015, South Africa’s Public Protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela, gave the keynote speech at the launch of SAIIA's book, 'African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn't.'
SAIIA has published a new book, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t? to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
Since independence, most African states have struggled to develop effective institutions that are responsive to the governance and development needs of their respective societies. This challenge is reflected not only in the prevalence of social and political strife in many African countries, but also in the poor socio-economic performance of the continent as a whole. The same could be said of the slow progress towards greater regional and continental integration, which, to a large extent is symptomatic of a weak institutional culture across the continent.
In February 2016, Uganda will go to the polls. It is only the country’s third election held since the constitutional restoration of multi-party democracy in 2005 and it is widely expected to be one of the most contentious. How might Uganda’s participation in the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) contribute to better elections?
‘African unity’ has been one of the most consistent themes in African political thought. Since independence, the vision of a continental order stretching from Cape Town to Cairo and from Dakar to Dar es Salaam has been an entrancing one. Africa, rather than being a geographical descriptor, would be a geopolitical identity.
Last week, four Country Review Reports were tabled at a Pan-African Parliament Plenary Session. This represents a crucial step forward for governance in Africa.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 222, September 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 25, September 2015
Why is the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the continent’s most important governance assessment and promotion tool, in the doldrums?
The sudden cancellation of an Extraordinary Summit on the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) raises serious concerns about the future of this important home-grown African governance and accountability tool. Nairobi was scheduled to host the APRM Forum of Heads of State and Government on 10-11 September 2015.