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African Institutions (386)

Thursday, 04 February 2016

Global Go To Think Tank Survey 2015

In his analysis of the most recent Global Go To Think Tank Survey, Professor Jim McGann of the University of Pennsylvania points to two key factors that can promote or inhibit the success of think tanks.
On 29 January 2016, a group of Africa’s Heads of State and Government met in Addis Ababa to determine the fate of one of the AU’s most daring initiatives. At stake was the future relevance of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).
The African Union (AU) is convening its January 2016 summit under the guiding theme: ‘African year of human rights with a particular focus on the rights of Women’. Notwithstanding the themes, which in part focus the deliberations at the Summit, the headlines and the pressing issues facing the continent will always steal the thunder from these lofty themes. This current summit is no different.
On Thursday, 21 January 2016 SAIIA will host launch of the World Bank publication, 'Factory Southern Africa? SACU in Global Value Chains'. The publication is the result of an extensive collaborative effort across many organisations and experts that have contributed within their fields of expertise.
A new book by SAIIA, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t?, focuses on political and social developments to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
On 24 November 2015, South Africa’s Public Protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela, gave the keynote speech at the launch of SAIIA's book, 'African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn't.'
SAIIA has published a new book, African Accountability: What Works and What Doesn’t? to assess the current state of governance and accountability in Africa.
Since independence, most African states have struggled to develop effective institutions that are responsive to the governance and development needs of their respective societies. This challenge is reflected not only in the prevalence of social and political strife in many African countries, but also in the poor socio-economic performance of the continent as a whole. The same could be said of the slow progress towards greater regional and continental integration, which, to a large extent is symptomatic of a weak institutional culture across the continent.
In February 2016, Uganda will go to the polls. It is only the country’s third election held since the constitutional restoration of multi-party democracy in 2005 and it is widely expected to be one of the most contentious. How might Uganda’s participation in the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) contribute to better elections?
‘African unity’ has been one of the most consistent themes in African political thought. Since independence, the vision of a continental order stretching from Cape Town to Cairo and from Dakar to Dar es Salaam has been an entrancing one. Africa, rather than being a geographical descriptor, would be a geopolitical identity.
Last week, four Country Review Reports were tabled at a Pan-African Parliament Plenary Session. This represents a crucial step forward for governance in Africa.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 222, September 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 25, September 2015
Why is the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the continent’s most important governance assessment and promotion tool, in the doldrums?
The sudden cancellation of an Extraordinary Summit on the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) raises serious concerns about the future of this important home-grown African governance and accountability tool. Nairobi was scheduled to host the APRM Forum of Heads of State and Government on 10-11 September 2015.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 141, August 2015
Heads of State and Governments of the member states of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) will be meeting this week in Gaborone, Botswana to further discuss the region’s industrial and infrastructure development.
The Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA) across Southern and Eastern Africa has been heralded as a crucially important step for African growth and economic development. But what exactly is it? How realistic is the agreement? When will we see any benefits from it? And who will benefit most (and least)?
The South African Journal of International Affairs invites article submissions and special issue proposals for our forthcoming volumes. Prospective authors may submit their articles via the SAJIA Scholar One website, detailed below. Prospective guest editors are encouraged to contact the Editor, Dr Martha Bridgman, at sajia.editor@saiia.org.za, with a concept note outlining the themed issue and proposed dates. 
SAIIA Policy Briefing 138, June 2015
[Updated 29 June 2015] Preceding this month's 25th African Union (AU) summit in Johannesburg a meeting of the AU Specialized Technical Committee on Defence, Safety and Security committed again to fully operationalise an African Standby Force (ASF) by December this year. The ASF has been ten years in the planning, and in that time has failed to establish a rapid response tool to deal with conflict on the continent.
The focus for this year’s African Union (AU) Summit – being held on 14 and 15 June 2015 in Johannesburg, South Africa – is the 'Year of Women Empowerment and Development towards Africa’s Agenda 2063'. The Summit follows on from the launch of the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA), which encompasses 26 countries in Southern and Eastern Africa, including SADC, the EAC and COMESA.
Foreign direct investment (FDI) has been a hot topic in South Africa, following the government's unilateral cancellation of bilateral investment treaties (BITs) with the European Union and the release of the draft Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill. But what is FDI, and why is it important? What are the other issues at play in the region when it comes to investment?
A few weeks ago, forces loyal to President Pierre Nkurunziza stymied a coup d’état in Burundi. A few months earlier, last October to be precise, the exact opposite occurred when an army officer in Burkina Faso, Lt Col. Isaac Zida, dislodged in a bloodless coup d’état West Africa’s former strong-man and president of that country, Blaise Compaoré.
A special workshop for regional stakeholders, ‘The African Peer Review Mechanism in Southern Africa: Exploring Synergies with the Southern African Development Community,’ was held on 20-21 May 2015 in Gaborone, Botswana.
This year’s Africa Day commemorations on 25 May – celebrating the founding of the Organisation of African Unity in Ethiopia in 1963 – occur against the backdrop of deadly xenophobic attacks in South Africa. A governance assessment of South Africa under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) in 2007 emphasised these underlying tensions with foreign nationals.