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SAIIA Policy Insights No 25, September 2015
Published in Policy Insights
During state visits to Kazakhstan and Indonesia in later 2013, President Xi Jinping outlined China’s vision of a ‘One Belt One Road’ – running overland from China to Eastern Europe – and a complementary Maritime Silk Road that stretches from Southeast China across the Indian Ocean to Dar es Salaam and onward around the Horn of Africa to the Mediterranean. While this vision remains under development, the engagement is intended as a multi-pronged diplomatic, economic and strategic initiative - as well as one that encourages closer cross-cultural contact – that will intensify China’s relations with Africa. Indeed this raises questions about the impact that the maritime initiative in particular will have on South Africa’s interests, given it is in the midst of developing its own maritime economy through Operation Phakisa and will assume the chair of the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) after Indonesia which currently chairs it.  
Published in Opinion & Analysis
The South Atlantic Zone refers to a grouping of countries from Latin America and Africa that fall on the littoral border of the South Atlantic Ocean. This region holds significant strategic and economic potential for countries from both regions. Traditionally, South Africa’s regional foreign policy is classified as either ‘Latin American’ or ‘African’. However, an approach that conceives of South Atlantic Zone countries as a single entity offers an opportunity to bridge this conceptual and geographic divide while providing a framework for deeper multilateral co-operation.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
On 8 May 2015, SAIIA hosted a seminar addressed by Prof. V.N. Attri, Chair of Indian Ocean Rim Studies (IORS) for the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) at the University of Mauritius, on 'The Indian Ocean’s Blue Economy: Perspectives on the Indian Ocean Rim Association.'
Published in Events
It is not surprising that African countries bordering the Indian Ocean see themselves as ‘gateways’ or entry points to the continent. The coastal towns and communities of South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique have for centuries had complex and dynamic cultural and economic links with their counterparts along the Indian Ocean Rim. Today, with the global liberalisation of trade and investment, these countries increasingly seek to position themselves between Africa’s interior and the broader world, and particularly the fast-growing economies in Asia.
Published in Events

SAIIA Occasional Paper No 78, February 2011

Published in Occasional Papers