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SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 3, June 2008 (French)

Published in Occasional Papers

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 2, June 2008 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 2, June 2008 (French)

Published in Occasional Papers

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 1, May 2008 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers
Tuesday, 29 April 2008

‘Our Way for Them to Cheat’

Last week, the government unveiled some of its plans for its self-assessment required by the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Tuesday, 29 April 2008

Civil Society Must Lead the Way

Two weeks ago, Minister of Public Service and Administration Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi announced, out of the blue, that the drafting phase in the South Africa process for the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) would start this coming Wednesday and end in November.

Published in Opinion & Analysis
SA has started its own African Peer Review Mechanism process with a call for submissions from individuals, institutions and groups on any of four areas of the review: democracy and political governance; economic governance and management; corporate governance; and socioeconomic development.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Tuesday, 29 April 2008

APRM: The Need for Transparency

By opening governments to scrutiny by citizens and continental peers, the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) embodies commendable ideals. But as the APRM, the flagship programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad) gains momentum, cracks threatening the legitimacy of the process are beginning to emerge – seriously jeopardising Africa’s attempt at seeking home-grown solutions to fix its problems.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

In Abuja, Nigeria, African leaders will gather in a few days to brainstorm on Nepad's future. They will be tempted to celebrate success but need to ask some vital questions, particularly about the African Peer Review Mechanism that was created by Nepad.

Published in Opinion & Analysis
Africa's leaders gather in Abuja, Nigeria, from today to review the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) along with the New Partnership for Africa's Development (Nepad). Both programmes currently face critical challenges and need heads of state to provide candid, effective leadership. To its credit, Nepad has contributed to higher aid levels and debt relief, provoked new thinking on development and created useful institutions. But many strong supporters are rightly asking: "What next?"
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Tuesday, 29 April 2008

Mismanaged from the Start?

Mbeki will have a lot to answer to when questioned about the African Peer Review report on governance in SA. Ross Herbert takes a look at where it went wrong and how a country that helped establish the system didn't follow its own guidelines.

In Addis Ababa this weekend, just ahead of the African Union Summit, President Thabo Mbeki must go before his peers to face questions about the final African Peer Review report on governance in South Africa.

Published in Opinion & Analysis
Nigeria's recent presidential elections were marred with accusations of widespread electoral fraud, raising serious questions about governance in Africa's most populous nation. To unite the nation again, the new president must take bold steps to restore Nigerians' faith in democracy. The first feather in his cap may be to put the Nigerian African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) process on the right track.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
SOUTH Africa, as one of the leading voices for governance reform in Africa, has undermined that very effort by the manner in which it has conducted the African Peer Review Mechanism. And this conduct has served to jeopardise the country’s hard-earned moral authority on the global stage and within the continent.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
IT IS an interesting reflection of the times that the word "denialism" has so easily slipped into everyday usage that any ordinary person immediately knows what the phrase conveys and the tendencies that create the need for such a word.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Ghana is hosting, from May 8 - 10, 2007. Below we bring to readers some background information and the objectives of the conference by DR KWAKU ASANTE-DARKO, a Senior Researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), located on the campus of The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.)
Published in Opinion & Analysis
I WISH to respond to minister Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi's article (Weekend Argus, May 27), in which she questions my integrity in speaking out about South Africa's flawed peer-review process and asserts that I have lied and "peddled half-truths".
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Is Uganda to be yet another country to duck its responsibility under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM)- Africa’s much heralded governance programme?

Gawaya Tegulle, writing in the September 10, 2007 edition of this newspaper, certainly seems to think so. He raises some pertinent concerns about the validity of a project that is being hampered by a leadership apparently not ready to be evaluated for its governance performance.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
Monday, 28 April 2008

In Pursuit of the Record

Freedom of information laws are proliferating in Africa, but access remains poor
 
TO DATE, 23 African states have submitted to the voluntary African Peer Review Mechanism, a component of Nepad, committing their countries' policies and practices to intense examination. Countries undergoing the process first assess their own records in political, economic and corporate governance. Then the peer review secretariat conducts a thorough external review.
 
Published in Opinion & Analysis
eAfrica, May 2005

THE mixed results from the Pan African Parliament's (PAP) third sitting last month provide food for thought. While they commendably resolved to send peace missions to Cote d'Ivoire and Congo, and made cogent recommendations on the Darfur conflict, they missed opportunities to exercise a crucial function of parliaments: that of oversight.
Published in Opinion & Analysis
eAfrica, December 2005

eAfrica spoke to Dr Bernard Kouassi, who was appointed CE of the APRM in January. Prior to his appointment, he was Executive Secretary and CEO of the food security organisation, Securité Alimentaire Durable en Afrique de l'Ouest Centrale based in Burkina Faso. He has served as Secretary-General of the Pan African Institute for Development in Cameroon and as a Specialist Manager of USAID assistance to the African Development Bank. He has a PhD in Business Administration from the University of Michigan and a Master of Business Admin from the University of Cincinnati and a Licence en Sciences Economique from the University of Abidjan.
Published in Opinion & Analysis