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As published in The Mercury, 1 February 2010

In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on 30 January 2010, President Jacob Zuma was scheduled to report to his peers regarding the implementation of the country’s National Programme of Action (NPoA), at the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) Forum meeting that takes place on the fringes of the African Union (AU) Summit. This governance improvement plan (NPoA) emerged from South Africa’s first APRM exercise undertaken in 2005-2007. A key question is whether this second annual report will be a significant improvement over the first one, delivered at the same time last year.

In a new publication titled “Off Track? Findings from South Africa’s First APRM Implementation Report”, the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) identifies deficiencies in South Africa’s first annual implementation report, meant to cover NPoA the period between November 2007 and December 2008. Our analysis suggests that the report suffers from three significant problems.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 53, January 2010

Published in Occasional Papers

For the vast majority of Nigeria's population of more than 140 million, the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) country review report for Nigeria published this week will have significance only if the media and civil society respond strongly to its findings, and if it is able to trigger substantial reforms.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

Seven years after it was established at the inaugural African Union (AU) Summit in Durban in July 2002, how has the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) –  the continent’s voluntary home-grown governance monitoring tool – fared? Why have some states not acceded? What has been achieved? And what challenges does this process face? 

Published in Opinion & Analysis

A day ahead of this year’s African Union summit in Libya, the 11th meeting of the forum of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) took place in the sweltering seaside town of Sirte. Reports emerging from those who attended threw up few surprises and some lingering concerns.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

On 30 June 2009, as African leaders gather on the sweltering, dusty shores of the Mediterranean in Sirte, the hometown of Libyan President Muammar al-Gaddafi, for the 13th Summit of the African Union, some early birds will attend another vital meeting on the fringes. Participating heads of states will attend the 11th Forum of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), Africa’s voluntary home-grown governance monitoring endeavour. What’s on the agenda? And where is the mechanism heading?

Published in Opinion & Analysis

SAIIA Research Report, No 3, June 2009

pdf  Download - English [.pdf] (396.24 kB)

This study is based on a research project carried out as part of the Governance and African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) Programme of the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA). This study attempts to distil lessons learned by a handful of African civil society coalitions on the dynamics of demanding improved governance of governments that are often averse to governance reform. 

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 34, June 2009 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers

The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) aims to promote 'good governance' in Africa, through systematic reviews of a state's governance practices and subsequent recommendations, made by the APRM's Panel of Eminent Persons in each report, on how to improve them. Deliberately styled as a 'peer review', it encourages representatives from different African countries (and ultimately an assembly of the participating Heads of State - the APR Forum), to interrogate each country's problems and to propose solutions.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

In a little over two weeks, Jacob Zuma will be sworn in as fourth president of South Africa since the advent of democracy in 1994.

At home, his presidency is viewed ambivalently - either as a breath of fresh air or as a worrying development for constitutionalism in South Africa. His supporters are quick to magnify former president Mbeki's aloofness and policy failures on crime, employment creation and HIV/AIDS as compelling evidence that a more affable and down-to-earth Jacob Zuma is indeed just what South Africa needs. His detractors associate the former deputy president with personal moral failure, corruption and a belief in populism: perhaps unjustly, given that question marks attached to his character are often linked to failed litigation against the incoming president.

Published in Opinion & Analysis

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 29, April 2009 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 28, March 2009 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers
Wednesday, 04 February 2009

2008 APRM Conference Photos

A selection of photos from the conference:

 





Published in Multimedia

This review first appeared in the South African Journal of International Affairs, Volume 15, Number 1, November 2008

The African Peer Review Mechanism: Lessons from the Pioneers, by Ross Herbert and Steven Gruzd, Johannesburg, South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), 2008, 424 pp., R220 (paperback), ISBN no. 1-919969-60-8

Published in Opinion & Analysis

This review first appeared in the South African Journal of International Affairs, Volume 15, Number 1, November 2008

 

The African Peer Review Mechanism: Lessons from the Pioneers, by Ross Herbert and Steven Gruzd, Johannesburg, South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), 2008, 424 pp., R220 (paperback), ISBN no. 1-919969-60-8
Published in Opinion & Analysis

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 20, January 2009 (French)

Published in Occasional Papers

SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 20, January 2009 (English)

Published in Occasional Papers