Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter Regions by...

Topics

Countries

Content Types

Create date

-

East Africa (302)

Sponsored by the Australian Government, SAIIA and the Institute for International Trade Australia hosted a one-day workshop on Harnessing Gender for Inclusive Trade Workshop.
Tanzania’s current legal framework has failed to address women’s rights and gender equality due to the prolonged and continued existence of forced child marriages, killings of elderly women, female genital mutilation and limited access to reproductive health services. Is the proposed new constitution likely to do a better job at protecting and promoting women’s rights in Tanzania?
The integration of transport networks within Africa has long been a priority for the continent, for reasons of trade and political development. Last week, the dream to connect all major African cities through a high-speed railway network took a critical step forward with the signing of a five-year action plan between the African Union and China.
SAIIA and the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS) held a policy dialogue on  ‘Revisiting the Migration Regimes in the EAC, SADC and COMESA.’
SAIIA Policy Insights No 33, July 2016
With eight countries already going to the polls and seven more planning to do so before December, 2016 has been a busy year for elections in Africa. At the halfway point of the year, what can be concluded about democratic processes across the continent? And what can be expected from the coming months?
Migration and the movement of people have become a multi-dimensional challenge in Africa. In order to investigate this challenge, SAIIA, on behalf of the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS), has been undertaking a research study focusing on the immigration protocols within the three Regional Economic Communities making up the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA). Tanzania, as the proposed host of the TFTA Secretariat, is an ideal place for engaging on these issues. Foreign Direct Investment, and more specifically, how to foster a greater enabling environment for FDI, has also been a key area of focus for SAIIA. As part of ongoing…
Kenya destroyed its entire stockpile of elephant ivory; over 100 tonnes of ‘white gold’ went up in smoke on Saturday, 30 April 2016. This stock consists of both illegally harvested ivory (confiscated from poachers or traders) and naturally accruing ivory (from natural mortality). In China - where the majority of the world’s ivory is currently either consumed or stockpiled - the recently reported price of ivory is USD$1,100/kg, and the average weight of a pair of elephant tusks is around 7kg. This means that the final value - at point of consumption - of one pair of elephant tusks is worth roughly…
The US Congress passed the African Growth and Opportunity (AGOA) Act into law in 2000 in order to promote US and African trade relations and contribute to economic development on the African continent through export-led growth. AGOA and the US – African trade relationship has been placed under the spotlight in recent months, particularly with regards to the extension of the Act towards September 2015 and around South Africa’s continued benefits under the programme (as the largest AGOA beneficiary). 
SAIIA Research Report No 22, February 2016 Download - English Governance and APRM Programme Africa’s turn to electoral democracy over the past three decades has rightly been hailed as a significant achievement, but it has not rid the continent of restrictive and authoritarian governance impulses. This report attempts to interrogate the concept of ‘freedom’ and how it is faring in Africa. To do so, it conceptualises freedom in terms of ‘constitutional liberalism’, and discusses this conceptualisation in relation to two broad themes: constitutionalism and civil liberties.
Last week, as political turmoil in Burundi continued to escalate, the African Union (AU) sent a delegation to the troubled East African state. The delegation was headed by South African President Jacob Zuma, and included leaders from Ethiopia, Gabon, Mauritania and Senegal. Shortly prior to that, UN chief Ban Ki-moon was in Burundi as part of international efforts to bring peace and stability to the country.
Incumbent President Yoweri Museveni has extended his 30-year rule of Uganda by at least another five years as a result of his definitive first round electoral victory over his closest rival, Kizza Besigye, who once served as his medical doctor during the bush war against Idi Amin. Besigye has lost the last three elections to Museveni and in 2011 petitioned the Supreme Court, alleging that the results of the elections were rigged. Museveni’s victory was widely anticipated by most political observers inside and outside the country. These are the undisputed facts of the 2016 elections.
‘Change’ was the word de jour as citizens headed to the polls for the fifth multi-party elections in Tanzania on 25 October 2015. At first glance, Tanzania seems to be a country on a clear trajectory to prosperity – maintaining a GDP growth rate of around 7 percent. Despite this impressive macroeconomic growth, distribution of wealth has been inadequate and poverty levels remain high. So did these polls deliver anything different?
In February 2016, Uganda will go to the polls. It is only the country’s third election held since the constitutional restoration of multi-party democracy in 2005 and it is widely expected to be one of the most contentious. How might Uganda’s participation in the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) contribute to better elections?
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 221, September 2015
In 2011, at the height of piracy attacks along the Somali coastline and the Gulf of Aden, 237 separate attacks were reported. This figure has fallen drastically over the years, with only 12 attacks being reported in 2014. This decline has been attributed to the collective efforts of the international community to address Somali piracy.
In March 2015 a group of 25 prominent academics and development co-operation experts from the global South gathered in Midrand, South Africa to discuss a common analytical framework for South−South co-operation.
The signing of the Tripartite Free Trade Agreement (TFTA) two weeks ago in Egypt between three of Africa’s major economic blocs COMESA, the EAC and SADC is an important development for intra-African trade and investment. By taking the first step towards the establishment of an economic bloc spanning the continent from South to North East, the African leaders have also laid the foundation for the establishment of a sizeable consumer market for international investors. Yet, it hardly received the attention it deserved at the AU’s 25th Summit in Johannesburg from 7 – 15 June 2015.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 139, June 2015 
SAIIA Policy Briefing 138, June 2015
As I write this, President al-Bashir has left the country. He should never have risked coming and the South African government should have suspected that something like this might happen.
A few weeks ago, forces loyal to President Pierre Nkurunziza stymied a coup d’état in Burundi. A few months earlier, last October to be precise, the exact opposite occurred when an army officer in Burkina Faso, Lt Col. Isaac Zida, dislodged in a bloodless coup d’état West Africa’s former strong-man and president of that country, Blaise Compaoré.
Ethiopia, Africa’s second most populous country, and one of the 12 fastest growing economies in the world is heading to a general election on 24 May 2015. There is very little to suggest that the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), which came to power after a bloody civil war in 1991 should have much to worry about.
(0 votes)
Six young people from SAIIA’s youth programmes ensured that the voice of South African youth was heard in regional negotiations for the upcoming World Humanitarian Summit, which will set the agenda for global humanitarian action.
The South African Institute of International Affairs proudly hosted a Speaker’s Meeting addressed by HE Mr Patrick Wamoto, High Commissioner of Kenya to South Africa, on 'Kenya: Current Priorities and Challenges.'
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 113, October 2014
Page 1 of 11