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All of Africa (2129)

This region encompasses all material that relate to any location in Africa. To the right are options for narrowing the material that will appear, by choosing a specific country or topic.

SAIIA Policy Insights No 40, March 2017
The South African Institute of International Affairs and the Global Challenges Foundation cordially invite you to Africa’s Role in Governing Global Risks: Emerging Voices from the Continent.
A prominent thread in the conversation about Africa’s development since the end of the Cold War has been the need for good governance. The continent’s resource and economic constraints have posed serious problems but a consensus has emerged that Africa’s success would hinge on getting its policies, institutions and public administration in order. This need for good governance was underscored by the tide of democratisation in the 1990s.
The recurring xenophobic violence is no new matter in South Africa. In 2006 an assessment on South Africa's state of democracy by the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), urged the government to address the perception that migrant workers are unfair competition for locals.
Are Southern providers more effective in facilitating peace processes, political settlements and building institutions in fragile states than traditional Western donors are? Is South-South peace-building different in approach, form and outcome than interventions by Western powers in conflict-affected areas?
African economies have long been dependent on old forms of energy such as oil, coal and gas. But with renewables on the rise, what should the continent be doing to make sure it is not left behind?
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Youth@SAIIA has partnered with UNICEF South Africa to raise awareness on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues. In October 2016, we did a series of WASH related model UNICEF conferences, and have invited some of the participants to write for our youth blog as they continue their work on wash in 2017.
On 23 June 2016, voters in the United Kingdom decided that their country should leave the European Union (EU). Politics has moved quickly since that day. The UK has a new government, and a new Prime Minister, Theresa May. And preparations are underway for a negotiation which will see the UK exiting the EU.
Monday, 27 February 2017

The Future of Zimbabwe

Robert Mugabe turned 93 last week, making him both one of the oldest and longest-serving presidents on the continent.
Today, potential urban investors and entrepreneurs look at Africa and see crowded, disconnected and costly cities. Such cities create low expectations for the scale of urban production and for returns on invested capital.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 251, February 2017
Today’s global political landscape is characterised by a number of disruptions to the status quo. A challenge to democracy revealed itself in the form of populism, as the Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s win attested. The threat of climate change, violent extremism and mass migration continues to shake Africa. In the midst of these developments, the 28th African Union (AU) Summit, held in Addis Ababa last month, on 30-31 January 2017, was markedly different to previous meetings.
In February 2015, South Africa experienced an upsurge of xenophobic attacks throughout the country.  In response to this horrendous act, SAIIA Chief Executive, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, wrote this article and former senior researcher Tjiurimo Hengari wrote a related paper on the subject ‘Xenophobia Trivialises South Africa’s Ambitious Africa Policy’. Earlier this week the violent acts flared up again in Pretoria West. The institute again calls for an end to the violence and the stereotyping of certain groups as more crime-prone than others. South Africa must address the ‘demon’ of xenophobia and violence once and for all if it is to remain…
On 22 February 2016, SAIIA National Chairman Mr Fred T Phaswana delivered his annual address. What follows is the full text of the speech.
If the first two months are anything to go by, 2017 will be an unusual year for Africa as two of its largest trading partners – China and America – are undergoing major political and economic transitions.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) today launched the Fourth edition of the African Governance Report (AGR-IV).
This year's African Union (AU) January summit, appropriately themed around the potential of the continent’s youth, sought to position the continental body to meet the challenges of the coming decades – an era during which the continent, having fallen behind its global peers, is pursuing a decisive developmental breakthrough.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 160, February 2017
Technology for Accountability, or 'T4A', is fast becoming the latest catchphrase in development. Also called 'civil tech', T4A broadly refers to any use of technology to further the aims of good governance, enhance transparency and promote accountability. To explore this area, SAIIA held a workshop on 'Technology and Accountability in Africa in the 21st Century' on 3 November 2016.
‘Grandpa, it’s enough.’ Julius Malema, leader of the Economic Freedom Fighters party in South Africa, has called for President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe to step down and not ‘overstay his welcome’. At 92, Mugabe is the oldest president in the world, bearing ironic comparisons to the gods of Ancient Greece. Like Zeus, who refused to share power with his siblings, Mugabe is unlikely to step down anytime soon.
SAIIA's annual Change Makers Forum on 9 February is an annual high-level dialogue to promote extractive sector transformation in Africa. Co-hosted with the University of Cape Town’s Minerals to Metals Programme, it is a neutral platform for bridging the divisions that continue to polarise mining discussions across Africa.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch cordially invites you to a Speaker's meeting to be addressed by Elizabeth Aardenburg
The recently gazetted 'Reviewed broad-based black-economic empowerment charter for the South African mining and minerals industry, 2016', stipulates that legally constituted trusts must be created by communities and workers respectively to hold ownership stakes in mining assets.
So much has been said about Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s term as Chairperson of the African Union Commission already, that regardless where one sits in estimation of her, good or bad, she certainly shook things up! Not only was she the first female AUC chair, but in a complete break with tradition, she was also the first South African. The furore surrounding her election continued throughout her tenure as her brash style proved difficult for many African diplomats to swallow.
How drastically the world has changed since this time last year. The cumulative odds on a Trump electoral win and a ‘yes’ to the Brexit referendum were 20 to 1. This shows how poor we are at predicting events, Black Swan events especially. Nonetheless, fund managers are tasked with interpreting data and predicting future trends to allocate clients’ capital efficiently. With the 2017 ‘Investing in African Mining Indaba’ how should they be thinking?
The annual African Mining Indaba will take place from 6-9 February in Cape Town, connecting investors with mining companies and governments. On the sidelines of this conference, SAIIA will host two important events.
On 1 February 2017, a high-level conference on Africa’s relationship with the Group of 20 (G20) was opened by the German Parliamentary State Secretary Thomas Silberhorn, who spoke on the key priorities of the German G20 Presidency. A dinner keynote that evening will be delivered by Deputy Governor Daniel Mminele of the South African Reserve Bank.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 159, January 2017
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