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Governance of Africa’s Resources

Based in Cape Town, GARP provides advisory and research support to governments and other stakeholders on governing Africa’s natural resources to maximise their equitable and sustainable development contributions. Regular field research, policy convening and dialogue activities are led by GARP experts in the three focal areas of mining and development; energy and the green economy; and the governance of ecosystems and commons resources (including fisheries and forestry).

Increasingly acknowledged as an influential African voice on resource governance, the programme works closely with local, regional and other international partners, including through the SAIIA Change-Makers forum and the Governance of Africa’s Resources Research Network (GARN). Co-ordinated by GARP, the network facilitates capacity-building, knowledge-sharing and the up-scaling of research outputs beyond the respective national levels.

View a playlist of videos related to this programme on YouTube. Contact the programme on resourcegov[@]saiia.org.za.

Africa’s Environment Day is celebrated on the 3rd of March each year. It is an important event which contributes to raising awareness of pressing environmental challenges for Africa. It also highlights the importance of environmental sustainability in achieving the continents development goals, and the centrality of the continent in these discussions.
Putting aside all the controversies surrounding President Jacob Zuma’s delivery of the 2015 State of the Nation address, the speech is worth analysing.
Friday, 13 February 2015

SAIIA 2015 Change-Makers Forum

SAIIA is convenening its third annual high-level dialogue forum for ‘Change-Makers’ in the African extractive sector. This event will be held on on Friday, 13 February 2015, on the sidelines of the 2015 Mining Indaba in Cape Town, South Africa.
On 9 February 2015, SAIIA's Governance of Africa's Resources Programme hosted a Mining Indaba Roundtable on 'From Acid Mine Drainage to Fracking? South Africa’s capacity for environmental oversight of extractive industries'.
On 26 January 2015, President Jacob Zuma provided reasons for referring the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRD-AB 2014) back to Parliament. The Bill had been shepherded through parliament shortly before the 2014 national elections, and has been on the President's desk since then.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 5, December 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 123, January 2015
From 9 to 13 February, the mining world will descend on Cape Town for the globe's biggest annual Mining Indaba. SAIIA will be hosting two important events alongside the Indaba to address some of the critical questions facing the mining industry in Africa.

Global energy consumption will increase rapidly in the next decade. The current core energy production sites in the world economy are unlikely to be able to supply this increasing demand. A new book, containing chapters from SAIIA researchers Dr Ana Alves and Dr Agathe Maupin, looks at Sub-Saharan Africa's potential energy resources in this light.

SAIIA Policy Briefing No 122, January 2015
Uncontrolled and often illegal sand mining activities are destroying some of South Africa’s most valuable natural resources at an unprecedented rate.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 116, November 2014
Botswana possesses an estimated 212 billion tonnes of coal, much of which is thermal quality and unsuitable for export. Under a conservative set of assumptions, however, the country could export roughly 72 million tonnes a year at peak production. But climate change concerns - and the impact of international climate change agreements to limit carbon emissions - may curtail the availability of future export markets.
Due to the increasing threat of climate change, the key role that energy plays in the interactions between societies and resources towards a sustainable development has gained broad attention. As renewable energy sources (RES) become more competitive in relation to other energy sources, they create another opportunity to attract additional investments in favour of a greener economy.
1 December 2014 marks the opening of the 20th annual Conference of Parties of the Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP20), in Lima, Peru. Dr Agathe Maupin, SAIIA’s Climate Change expert, has attended several previous COP meetings, and will be in Lima for the next two weeks.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 4, November 2014
SAIIA’s Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme (GARP) works to improve policies governing Africa’s abundant natural resources. The programme analyses the key local, continental and global trends influencing the management, use, development and regulation of Africa’s natural resources. The short video above outlines the work of the programme, and how it contributes to the sound and sustainable use of Africa’s resources for development of the continent.
The French Embassy in Pretoria and the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), with the support of the French Agency for Development (AFD), the Research Institute for Development (IRD) and the French Institute of South Africa (IFAS), hosted a one and a half day conference on 'Climate Change in Africa: Perspectives on Scientific Evidence, Public Policies and Leading Initiatives' from 3 to 4 November 2014 at SAIIA.
In recent years, there has been increasing interest in Africa's natural resources, spurred on by new mineral discoveries. Yet there has also been a growing sense that the exploitation of these resources has to result in a greater developmental gain for the continent.
As part of its 80th anniversary celebrations, SAIIA held a Foreign Policy Conference from 28 to 30 October 2014 on “Global changes, ‘Africa Rising’ and Agenda 2063: Implications for the foreign policies of South Africa and other African driver states”.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 201, September 2014
Understandably, the mining industry is not perceived as a bastion of environmental preservation. That many of the world’s minerals and hydrocarbons are found in pristine environments is an unfortunate but inescapable reality. Guinea’s tier-one iron-ore deposit, for instance, is under one of Africa’s last remaining rain forests.
In June 2014 Botswana’s Okavango Delta was enlisted as the 1000th UNESCO World Heritage Site – a status that underscores the Delta’s global ecological significance and highlights the need to protect and manage this important biosphere. September 2014 also marked the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Permanent Cubango-Okavango River Basin Commission (OKACOM) agreement that commits Namibia, Angola and Botswana, the three riparian states of the River Basin, to a coordinated and environmentally sustainable regional water governance strategy. In 1996 the Okavango Delta was also declared a Ramsar Site, further highlighting its status as a wetland of global importance.
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch invites you to a public seminar by Dr Mare Sarr on "Capital Flight and Oil in Africa."