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Governance of Africa’s Resources

Based in Cape Town, GARP provides advisory and research support to governments and other stakeholders on governing Africa’s natural resources to maximise their equitable and sustainable development contributions. Regular field research, policy convening and dialogue activities are led by GARP experts in the three focal areas of mining and development; energy and the green economy; and the governance of ecosystems and commons resources (including fisheries and forestry).

Increasingly acknowledged as an influential African voice on resource governance, the programme works closely with local, regional and other international partners, including through the SAIIA Change-Makers forum and the Governance of Africa’s Resources Research Network (GARN). Co-ordinated by GARP, the network facilitates capacity-building, knowledge-sharing and the up-scaling of research outputs beyond the respective national levels.

View a playlist of videos related to this programme on YouTube. Contact the programme on resourcegov[@]saiia.org.za.

SAIIA, the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, the British High Commission and the European Union Delegation cordially invite you to a policy dialogue on climate change adaptation readiness.
Thursday, 22 September 2016

Time for Change

Tusk, in association with Stop Ivory and SAIIA, held a 'Time For Change' international lunchtime reception on the eve of CITES CoP17. The event drew the world's attention to the continuing crisis in poaching and the need to maintain momentum in tackling the issue.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 244, September 2016
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 243, September 2016
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international regulatory treaty between 182 member states. It was formed in 1973 and regulates the international trade in over 35,000 wild species of plants and animals.
The upcoming conference for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Johannesburg is set to be a firecracker political drama, given conflicting African proposals over elephant conservation efforts.
In the latest SAIIA event exclusively for our diplomatic and corporate members, we were pleased to host an Executive Briefing on 'CITES: Where to from here and how to improve?'.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 34, August 2016
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 239, September 2016
Three countries in southern Africa have banded together to press for the ban on international trade in ivory to be lifted. South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe have submitted a joint proposal to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). They are asking for permission to trade in ivory without which, they argue, there are no positive incentives to conserve elephants or their habitats.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 33, July 2016
SAIIA Policy Briefings 151, July 2016
The mineral resources minister recently gazetted an amended Mining Charter, which generated a good deal of controversy. Although the revised charter retains the principal target of achieving 26% ownership of mining companies by historically disadvantaged South Africans, it adds the requirement of retaining this level continuously. A further amendment stipulates that workers, through the establishment of employee share ownership plans (Esops), are to be allocated a minimum stake of 5% that counts towards the 26% total black economic empowerment (BEE) equity.
Following our beautiful photo report from Botswana, we offer you another look behind the scenes at SAIIA's work in the field. Join researchers Romy Chevallier and Ross Harvey as they travel to Tanzania to investigate small scale mining and sustainable management of the country's forests and wildlife.
In early May, the governments of Zimbabwe and Namibia took the unusual step of petitioning the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) to remove their elephants from CITES protection, which currently prohibits them from selling elephant ivory. Arguing that the international ban – imposed in 1989 - of selling ivory has been a costly and unsuccessful 26-year ‘experiment’, officials from the two Southern African countries are trying to make a case for releasing their ivory stockpiles onto the global market and thereby turn a profit.
If Dickens were observing South Africa’s mining sector, in the context of an economy that is growing at less than one percent a year, and a political landscape fractured by state capture and ratings downgrade threats, he may have started his famous novel with the line, ‘It was the worst of times’, and left it at that. Mining production has declined 18% year-on-year to May and job losses are growing.
The 2016 International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB) will be commemorated on the 22nd of May with the theme of ‘Mainstreaming Biodiversity: Sustaining People and their Livelihoods’. In December this year, this same theme will form the basis of discussion of the 13th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP13) in Cancun, Mexico. These events provide a unique opportunity for African governments to explore strategies of halting the degradation of ecosystems while at the same time promoting inclusive socioeconomic development. 
Kenya destroyed its entire stockpile of elephant ivory; over 100 tonnes of ‘white gold’ went up in smoke on Saturday, 30 April 2016. This stock consists of both illegally harvested ivory (confiscated from poachers or traders) and naturally accruing ivory (from natural mortality). In China - where the majority of the world’s ivory is currently either consumed or stockpiled - the recently reported price of ivory is USD$1,100/kg, and the average weight of a pair of elephant tusks is around 7kg. This means that the final value - at point of consumption - of one pair of elephant tusks is worth roughly…
The UN 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) seek to provide a holistic and integrated approach to ending global poverty and hunger by the end of 2030. In order to realistically achieve these goals the global community needs to interrogate and address some deeply structural issues such as common but differentiated responsibilities; non-inclusive growth and poverty; poor governance; unsustainable patterns of consumption and production; unmaintainable population growth; and the management of the natural resource base for future social development. This also requires the acceptance that global goals, of whatever type, are only likely to gain support if they address existing political-economic…
On 22 April, the Paris climate agreement will be officially opened for signature at a special ceremony at the UN headquarters in New York. This represents a key opportunity for Africa to do a first reality-check on climate actions.
SAIIA cordially invites you to a seminar on 'The Implications of COP-21 for South Africa's Climate Change Policy Trajectory.'
The single most significant thing that President Zuma acknowledged in his ‘State of the Nation Address’ last week was the risk of a credit rating downgrade for South Africa:
There is growing interest in the commercial value of South Africa’s coastal zones, primarily for sand mining to supply the construction sector. While stakeholders, including resident communities, recognise the potential for economic development and employment, there are also significant negative environmental and livelihood consequences.
The annual African Mining Indaba takes place from 8-11 February 2016 in Cape Town, the flagship event for investors, mining companies and governments. But what happens at the Indaba? What are the concerns?
The Mining Indaba, hosted annually in Cape Town, has arrived. However, the outlook for commodity prices is arguably the worst it has been since 2008, and China’s bumpy economic landing is not helping.
On 8 February 2016, a SAIIA Mining Indaba Roundtable in Cape Town on ‘Contested Spaces: Mining and South Africa’s Coastal Zones’ attracted government, business and civil society to engage in some excellent debates.