Select a language for instant Google Translation

Filter this Programme by...

All the content for this programme is currently displayed by date. To filter this and only see certain types of publications, simply click on the options below...

Topics

Regions

Countries

Content Types

Governance of Africa’s Resources

Based in Cape Town, GARP provides advisory and research support to governments and other stakeholders on governing Africa’s natural resources to maximise their equitable and sustainable development contributions. Regular field research, policy convening and dialogue activities are led by GARP experts in the three focal areas of mining and development; energy and the green economy; and the governance of ecosystems and commons resources (including fisheries and forestry).

Increasingly acknowledged as an influential African voice on resource governance, the programme works closely with local, regional and other international partners, including through the SAIIA Change-Makers forum and the Governance of Africa’s Resources Research Network (GARN). Co-ordinated by GARP, the network facilitates capacity-building, knowledge-sharing and the up-scaling of research outputs beyond the respective national levels.

View a playlist of videos related to this programme on YouTube. Contact the programme on resourcegov[@]saiia.org.za.

SAIIA Policy Insights No 44, May 2017
Klaus Schwab, the founder of the World Economic Forum, argues that the single most important challenge facing humanity today is how to understand and shape the new technology revolution. What exactly is this revolution, and why does it matter, especially for Africa?
SAIIA Policy Insights No 41, March 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 40, March 2017
African economies have long been dependent on old forms of energy such as oil, coal and gas. But with renewables on the rise, what should the continent be doing to make sure it is not left behind?
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 160, February 2017
SAIIA's annual Change Makers Forum on 9 February is an annual high-level dialogue to promote extractive sector transformation in Africa. Co-hosted with the University of Cape Town’s Minerals to Metals Programme, it is a neutral platform for bridging the divisions that continue to polarise mining discussions across Africa.
The recently gazetted 'Reviewed broad-based black-economic empowerment charter for the South African mining and minerals industry, 2016', stipulates that legally constituted trusts must be created by communities and workers respectively to hold ownership stakes in mining assets.
How drastically the world has changed since this time last year. The cumulative odds on a Trump electoral win and a ‘yes’ to the Brexit referendum were 20 to 1. This shows how poor we are at predicting events, Black Swan events especially. Nonetheless, fund managers are tasked with interpreting data and predicting future trends to allocate clients’ capital efficiently. With the 2017 ‘Investing in African Mining Indaba’ how should they be thinking?
The annual African Mining Indaba will take place from 6-9 February in Cape Town, connecting investors with mining companies and governments. On the sidelines of this conference, SAIIA will host two important events.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 159, January 2017
There is an increasing global demand for food, water and energy. All three are inter-linked, a fact that has increasingly become the focus of attention for policy makers and governments.
China has published a notice that the processing and sale of ivory and ivory products 'will be stopped by December 31, 2017.' Following a decision taken at the latest Convention on International Trade in Endangered Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) conference to end all domestic trade in ivory, China has duly made a credible commitment to this end.
The Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has released a new book that questions which energy transformations are under way in the G20, a group of twenty nations that represent 85% of the global economy. SAIIA’s Agathe Maupin has contributed to this publication, focusing on South Africa’s energy challenges and the key lessons that could be derived from the G20 German presidency.
It is expected that temperatures in Southern Africa will rise to between 1.5°C and 3°C due to climate change by the year 2050. This is likely to cause heavy fluctuations of weather patterns and more frequent severe weather events like droughts and floods. Agriculture will be severely affected.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 156, November 2016
The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is expected to go to the polls to elect a new leader to succeed President Joseph Kabila, whose mandate expires on 19 December. This should have happened towards the end of November but the DRC’s constitutional court recently approved a request by the electoral commission for a postponement. It is now widely expected that polling will take place in 2018.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 153, November 2016
Nearly 200 countries will convene in Marrakesh, Morocco today to advance progress made on the Paris Agreement on climate change. Signed by 197 countries last December, the Paris Agreement sets out the global expectations for dramatically reducing carbon emissions. The Agreement entered into force on 4 November 2016, signalling a true global effort to tackle the climate challenge.
A farmer is weeding his fields by hand deep in rural Tanzania – it seems a timeless scene, far removed from the high-tech, interconnected world of today. Yet the weather forecasts that the farmer used to time his planting, the inexpensive mobile phone that he uses to check market prices before harvesting, and possibly even the potential to receive government assistance should his region be struck by drought all depend, in some or other way, on space technology.
With 27,000 African savannah elephants a year illegally killed for their ivory, the species is in peril. Now international action at CITES and the closure of domestic ivory markets are attacking the ivory trade at both ends. But we must also give our full support to 'elephant neighbour' communities.
The upcoming 2016 World Food Prize will honour contributions in the field of biofortification. With almost one person in four being undernourished in Africa, what do recent experiences tell us about the role that biofortified foods can play in ensuring nutritious and safe food for the continent?
There has been growing interest in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and in particular, whether this international conference will decide to extend the international ban on elephant ivory - in place since 1990 – into domestic markets.
A crucial international wildlife meeting is currently taking place in South Africa. But can these kinds of high-level conferences translate into local actions to protect endangered wildlife such the African elephant? In an article for The Mercury, SAIIA Senior Researcher Yu-Shan Wu discusses the findings of her latest research into the matter.
Dozens of wildlife species are endangered, pushed ever closer to extinction by habitat loss and illegal trade. This is an important and disquieting element of the so-called Anthropocene, the proposed geological epoch to describe the current period, in which the earth and its complex systems have been fundamentally shaped by human activity. The illegal wildlife trade, which has been estimated at $7 billion to $23 billion a year, is the world’s fourth-largest form of transnational organized crime.