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Governance and APRM Programme

Good governance assists countries to adhere to the rule of law, enhance economic performance and minimise conflict. This programme seeks to stimulate informed discussion and insightful research on governance in Africa, through the lens of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the continent’s innovative governance monitoring and promotion instrument. The GAP programme also works with civil society organisations to strengthen their interest and meaningful participation in the APRM and related processes in the emerging African Governance Architecture (AGA). We aim to improve the ability of the APRM to contribute to governance reforms, institutions and processes. As a result SAIIA is widely seen as the leading independent authority on the APRM.

The current programme is a collaboration between SAIIA and the Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa (EISA). GAP also works with the APRM Secretariat on a project to enhance the interaction of the Pan-African Parliament with the APRM.

How do emerging democracies act on human rights concerns, particularly in a multipolar international system where most states consistently choose self-interest over values? This question and others were addressed at a public panel and an experts’ seminar, on 12 to 13 May 2014, organised by SAIIA, the Ford Foundation and the Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre.
Sociologist Robert K Merton’s ‘Law of Unintended Consequences’ is the observable phenomenon of purposeful actions having unexpected results, most often negative ones. Mozambique’s 2014 elections have been characterised by continuing tensions between the Government of Mozambique and the Resistência Nacional Moçambicana (RENAMO) opposition political party, which the latter has sought to escalate in the post-election period, and ahead of the final results.[i]
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 108, October 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 105, September 2014
Does being an active member of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), the instrument adopted by the African Union to improve the quality of governance across the continent, help a country improve its rankings in the Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG)?
SAIIA Report No 17, August 2014 Download - English (642.1 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeThe Africa Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) is an initiative aimed at fostering good governance and development in its participating states. As part of its multi-pronged inquiry, it devotes a great deal of attention to investigating corporate governance on the continent. However, thus far corporate governance has attracted less attention than any other area of the APRM.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 104, September 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 103, September 2014
The existence of a vibrant civil society is often seen as an important element of a democratic state. Yet what is civil society and what does it need to do to contribute meaningfully and enhance democratic elements of the country’s politics and governance practices?
Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country to proclaim independence in 1957, and also the first to complete a governance review in 2005 under the APRM (African Peer Review Mechanism). Ghana ran one of the most transparent and inclusive processes on the continent, and this has spurred important reforms. As South Africa prepares to embark on its second review, it can learn important lessons from the Ghanaian experience.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 101, August 2014
More than a week has now passed since the ostensible coup attempt of 29 August in Lesotho. This was sold officially as an operation to neutralise elements within the Lesotho Mounted Police Service who were colluding with government supporters to disrupt a protest march the following Monday.
The South African Institute of International Affairs was proud to host a public lecture with Prominent Ghanaian academic Professor SKB Asante and Ambassador Ashraf Rashed, deputy chairperson of the APRM Panel of Eminent Persons, on 8 September 2014. A video interview with the experts present is now available.
Strategies to increase women’s participation in politics have been advanced through conventions, protocols and international agreements for gender mainstreaming, but they are yet to prove effective in achieving gender parity in the highest government rankings. The latest data from the Inter-Parliamentary Union show that globally, women account for an average of about 20% of parliamentary seats.
South Africa is soon due to undergo its second Review under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), Africa's premier governance tool. We speak with Minister Collins Chabane, of South Africa's Department of Public Service and Administration about the APRM.
The Honorable Collins Chabane, the Minister for Public Service and Administration and South African National APRM Focal Point, opened a workshop today on ‘Popularising the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) through the media’.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 194, July 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 98, June 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 96, June 2014
Despite the shadow cast by the charges against President Uhuru Kenyatta and Vice President William Ruto at the International Criminal Court, Kenya has been quietly going about compiling its second Country Self-Assessment Report (CSAR) under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM). As an APRM member, Kenya is expected to submit itself to the continent’s voluntary home-grown tool that assesses the state of governance in participating countries. The APRM proposes corrective measures to address governance gaps that emerge during the review.
On 12-13 May, SAIIA, the Ford Foundation and the Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre (NOREF), organised a public panel and an experts’ seminar on ‘Human Rights, Emerging Powers and International Governance: Civil Society Actors and Transnational Advocacy in the 21st Century’.
The 20th commemoration of the Rwandan genocide this year offers an apt opportunity to reflect on how far Africa has come in preventing a reoccurrence of such a tragedy.
Good governance is broadly recognised as a necessary condition for peace and development in Africa. At the EU-Africa Summit held in Brussels on 2 to 3 April 2014, one of the five key priorities identified for joint action was ‘democracy, good governance and human rights’.