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Economic Diplomacy

Economic diplomacy is concerned with setting the ‘rules of the game’ for the conduct of economic policy. Effective economic diplomacy requires understanding both the domestic political economy environment and the external negotiating environment, and the constraints of each.

Economic diplomacy matters to Southern Africa because the rules of the game shape domestic economic policy in important ways, and in an increasingly multi-polar world international economic negotiations are growing in importance across a number of fronts. These may shape domestic and regional economic policies in ways that could be inimical to pursuing sustainable outcomes. Therefore it is necessary to ensure regional interests are articulated and understood.

SAIIA’s primary purpose is to assist with the articulation of such interests by conducting high-level analytical work and making it publicly available in digestible forms to key Southern African actors and their international counterparts.

Contact the programme on edip[@]saiia.org.za.

Edited by G Mills and G Shelton, 2003ISBN: 1-919969-12-8Pages: 85This book, a compilation of papers presented at a conference at the South African Institute of International Affairs on The Asia-Pacific and Africa: Realising Economic Potential, highlights the areas of opportunity in South and Southern Africa’s commercial relations with countries in the Asia-Pacific region.
In late February a diplomatic flurry in the regional trading firmament erupted.  Our Foreign Minister stated in Parliament that the EU, out of fear over the Chinese trade "threat", is using Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the EU to lock in old colonial trading relationships. Subsequently Peter Mandelson, EU Trade Commissioner, descended on Pretoria and Gaborone. What is going on? 
The 4th IBSA Summit The 4th India-Brazil-South Africa (IBSA) trilateral summit will be held in Brazil on 15 April 2010. Established in 2003, the trilateral forum aims to improve relations between the three countries in a host of spheres. SAIIA’s Emerging Powers Programme explores key policy issues in this expanding South-South relationship. Some of these can be viewed here:
SACU turns 100 This year the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), the oldest customs union in the world, marks its 100th anniversary.  This centenary comes amidst upheavals in global economics, paralysis in the multilateral trading system, and the organization’s own trials notably the split precipitated by the Economic Partnership Agreement negotiations with the European Union. In a historically unprecedented move SACU heads of state and government met for the first time ever on April 22nd and issued a joint communiqué reaffirming their confidence in SACU’s future.
Position: SAIIA KAS Visiting Scholar 2017Programme: Economic Diplomacy Programme
Sir Nicholas Stern, from the British High Commission, is undertaking an international tour to promote The Stern Review and his economic message on the urgency of tackling climate change through active dissemination of the key issues. The Review was launched on 30 October 2006 and it has received significant and positive media coverage around the world. He will be at the institute where he will discuss his findings under the topic 'The Stern Review: Economics of Climate Change' at Jan Smuts House at 7pm. A copy of the Stern Review is available at www.sternreview.org.uk RSVP: Pumla Moguerane on (011) 339-2021 or mogueranep@saiia.wits.ac.za Venue: Jan Smuts House
by Dianna Games Business in Africa Report, No 3, 2004Business in Africa Project SAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-28-4Published by SAIIA & funded by the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria.     In the rush for markets into the rest of Africa after the country's 1994 democratic elections, South African companies did not regard Nigeria as a most favoured destination. However, it was not long before South African companies recognised that despite the perceived difficulties of the country, Nigeria was a market to be reckoned with. This report is based on a series of interviews conducted both in Nigeria and South Africa over several…
Business in Africa Report, No 2, 2004 by Neuma Grobbelaar SAIIA: 2004ISBN: 1-919969-23-3Published by SAIIA & funded by the Royal Danish Embassy, Pretoria Based on a survey conducted in November 2003 of 20 South African companies doing business in Mozambique, this publication tracks the experience of South African firms in that country. Although South Africa is a leading investor representing 49% of total foreign direct investment (FDI) from 1997-2002, the sizeable number of South African businesses does not imply that the country offers a trouble-free, uncomplicated business environment.
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