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Wednesday, 14 September 2011

Two Sides of the Same Coin: Political Activism in Lesotho and Swaziland

  SAIIA

MM Review Publishing Company & the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences

Invite you to "Two Sides of the Same Coin; Political Activism in Lesotho and Swaziland". A fascinating and informative dialogue with leading academics and political analysts some of whom have provided chapters in the book, Against all Odds: Opposition Political Parties in Southern Africa edited by Hussein Solomon. (Published by KMMR and The South African Institute of International Affairs).

When: Wednesday, 14 September 2011
Time: 17:30 for 18:00
Where: Conference Hall, 100 at Pretoria University

KMM Review Publishing Company & the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences

 
 
 

Invite you to "Two Sides of the Same Coin; Political Activism in Lesotho and Swaziland". A fascinating and informative dialogue with leading academics and political analysts some of whom have provided chapters in the book, Against all Odds: Opposition Political Parties in Southern Africa edited by Hussein Solomon. (Published by KMMR and The South African Institute of International Affairs).

 

Lesotho and Swaziland reflect the challenges confronting developing states within the context of a globalising world where one increasingly sees the stark and often brutal interface between economics and politics. Both countries have experienced increasing political instability as a result of economic hardships and poor governance. Overwhelming economic dependence on South Africa, which gives Pretoria great leverage over Maseru and Mbabane, cannot be discounted as a factor contributing to both stability and instability.

Whilst Lesotho has a vibrant multiparty political system, Swaziland’s political parties remain “banned”. In both countries powerful social movements, especially the trade union movement, are challenging the authority of the political elite. In the case of Swaziland this political activism is increasingly regionalised through, on the one hand the support that Swazi activists enjoy from their counterparts in South Africa, especially COSATU, on the other the support of the aristocracy enjoys from the SA government.

Indeed the challenges confronting the fragile politics of Lesotho and Swaziland also reflect the challenges confronting the Southern African region as a whole. The direction in which these countries move may well reflect the future prospects of SADC.

Speakers include: Dr Francis Makoa (Lesotho Chapter), Professor Petros Magagula (Swaziland Chapter), Dr Somadoda Fikeni, Professor Hussein Solomon and Mr. Tsoeu Petlane (SAIIA)

RSVP: Ms Wilma Martin on (012) 420-2034 or wilma.martin@up.ac.za by 12 September 2011.

Download the invitation [.pdf]