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Zimbabwe (105)

Three countries in southern Africa have banded together to press for the ban on international trade in ivory to be lifted. South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe have submitted a joint proposal to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). They are asking for permission to trade in ivory without which, they argue, there are no positive incentives to conserve elephants or their habitats.
The Zimbabwean state has provided some of the biggest lessons in humility for political analysts in this century. Its government, headed by the indomitable Robert Mugabe, has failed to ‘definitively fail’ despite every warning since ZANU-PF war veterans began the land invasions that prompted the first wave of crisis in that country in 2001.
The Beitbridge border between Zimbabwe and South Africa, the busiest border post in Southern Africa, has been rocked by unprecedented violent protests since June. The protests largely concern the restrictive trade measures unexpectedly introduced by the Zimbabwean government, which included banning the importation of basic commodities like body creams, baked beans and bottled water.
In early May, the governments of Zimbabwe and Namibia took the unusual step of petitioning the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) to remove their elephants from CITES protection, which currently prohibits them from selling elephant ivory. Arguing that the international ban – imposed in 1989 - of selling ivory has been a costly and unsuccessful 26-year ‘experiment’, officials from the two Southern African countries are trying to make a case for releasing their ivory stockpiles onto the global market and thereby turn a profit.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 126, February 2015
On Friday 30 January, Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe was appointed the new chair of the African Union. His appointment was made during the annual two-day heads of state summit at the African Union's headquarters in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 205, November 2014
Q&A with Dr. Zhang Chun of the Shanghai Institute of International Studies and Dr. Abiodun Alao of King’s College London.The scholarly and policy focus on China in Africa is beginning to move beyond the examination of the macro-trends to a more nuanced emphasis on sectoral and bilateral country studies.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 202, October 2014
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 98, June 2014
The overarching mandate of the Southern African Development Community is the furtherance of socio-economic cooperation and integration, including political and security cooperation among its fifteen member states. Ordinarily, it is with these in mind that the 33RD annual SADC Summit is convening in Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. The agenda of the summit is congested, and is clearly illustrative of the multitude challenges facing the regional body nineteen years since its transformation in 1994 from the Southern African Development Coordination Conference, which was founded in 1980.
South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Professor Brian Raftopolous speaking on "Zimbabwe: post-election round up"
Even before Zimbabweans went to the polls on 31 July 2013, the Southern African Development Community’s Organ on Politics, Defence and Security raised a litany of concerns about the elections.SADC requested that the election be postponed in order to allow reforms as provided for in the Global Political Agreement to be effected.
As the votes are counted after yesterday's Zimbabwean election, we thought the following article might be of interest. An anonymous social media commentator has attracted the world's attention in the run-up to the election. SAIIA's Yu-Shan Wu (@yushan_wu) and Catherine Grant Makokera (@cathgmak) take a look at what they call "one manifestation of a silent revolution ... taking place."
If there is one thing that is different to the 2008 Zimbabwean elections, it is that the 2013 election has a new ‘candidate’. His name is Baba Jukwa. The anonymous social media icon and commentator, portrayed as a cartoon of an old man and coined ‘the Julian Assange of Zimbabwe’, has attracted the world’s attention.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEDear Editors, 29 July 2013 SAIIA Media Alert: SAIIA expert analysis and commentary on the Zimbabwean election  Zimbabwean citizens go to the polls this week for what has been called one of the most important elections in Zimbabwe’s history since independence. President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu-PF and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) are expected to contest a tough election; the outcome of which has repercussions for South Africa and the Southern African Development Community (SADC).
This year’s elections in Zimbabwe may well prove to be a watershed for the Southern African country but as the elections move ever closer, the outcome appears less and less certain.
Council of Foreign Relations senior fellow Ambassador John Campbell recently released a policy innovation memorandum entitled, 'Zimbabwe: An Opportunity for Closer U.S.-South Africa Relations.' It is heartening to see analysts writing on topics they perceive as beneficial to closer relations between the United States and South Africa. Campbell, a former US Ambassador to Nigeria, makes a number of valid points, and in principle, the tone of his brief is correct. Both sides want an end to the political crisis. His main argument is the upcoming elections create an opportunity for Washington and Pretoria to forge a partnership on Zimbabwe that…
The SADC summit in Maputo, Mozambique, this week will consider approving the regional infrastructure development master plan. It aims to deal with the region’s deficit in road, rail, ports, power, communication and water infrastructure. The deficit is estimated to be about $100-billion.
Making Key Business Constraints in SADC Tangible: Experiences of the Private Sector Harare, Zimbabwe
The SADC Secretariat, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit – GIZ – and the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) would like to invite you to participate in the launch of a series of business case studies documenting theTOP 10 business constraints in SADC region in a tangible way.Johannesburg
An event co-hosted by SAIIA and ACODE, members of the Governance of Africa's Resources Research Network (GARN)Golf Course Hotel, Kampala, Uganda
The SADC Secretariat, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit – GIZ – and the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) would like to invite you to participate in the launch of a series of business case studies documenting the TOP 10 business constraints in SADC region in a tangible way.Location: Gabarone
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 42, December 2011
On behalf of the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), the Centre for Research and Development, and the Heinrich Böll Stiftung (HBS), we would like to invite you for a roundtable seminar on the topic: ‘Zimbabwe’s Diamonds and the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme: Effectiveness and Responsibilities’ Instead of funding the country’s reconstruction after years of economic collapse, the discovery of alluvial diamonds in Marange, eastern Zimbabwe, in 2006 has plunged the area into chaos and brought with it armed security forces, violence, increased social instability and environmental degradation.Venue: Jan Smuts House
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