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Tanzania (48)

Global and regional value chain theory and analysis has mushroomed in recent years. Theorists point out that over the past decades world trade has increasingly been characterised by the fracturing of manufacturing and production processes, with different goods and services produced in different geographical locations, ultimately forming part of a single commodity. Specialisation in certain component parts of the whole has become more important than being able to produce and entire product. Lead firms manage to source inputs from across the globe.
The recent Open Government Partnership (OGP) High Level Event on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly brought sad tidings for OGP in Africa.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 52, July 2017
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 264, July 2017
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 259, June 2017
SAIIA Policy Insights No 46, May 2017
SAIIA and the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS) hosted a Policy Dialogue, to revisit the investment climate in Southern Africa, with a particular focus on Tanzania.
Tanzania’s current legal framework has failed to address women’s rights and gender equality due to the prolonged and continued existence of forced child marriages, killings of elderly women, female genital mutilation and limited access to reproductive health services. Is the proposed new constitution likely to do a better job at protecting and promoting women’s rights in Tanzania?
On 25 October 2015, Tanzanians elected John Pombe Magufuli as their president – nicknamed "The Bulldozer" for his self-assertive, brash leadership style, and his ability to push through his agenda. His policies have a strong internal focus, including minimising his foreign travel to save costs and asking government officials to do the same. His skipping of summits, has however raised questions about Tanzania possibly missing out on important international opportunities. Ahead of a visit to Rwanda, President Magufuli said, “I don’t like travelling abroad because I am fond of saving and you can't keep pace with other nations in equal…
Following our beautiful photo report from Botswana, we offer you another look behind the scenes at SAIIA's work in the field. Join researchers Romy Chevallier and Ross Harvey as they travel to Tanzania to investigate small scale mining and sustainable management of the country's forests and wildlife.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 32, June 2016 
Migration and the movement of people have become a multi-dimensional challenge in Africa. In order to investigate this challenge, SAIIA, on behalf of the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS), has been undertaking a research study focusing on the immigration protocols within the three Regional Economic Communities making up the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA). Tanzania, as the proposed host of the TFTA Secretariat, is an ideal place for engaging on these issues. Foreign Direct Investment, and more specifically, how to foster a greater enabling environment for FDI, has also been a key area of focus for SAIIA. As part of ongoing…
‘Change’ was the word de jour as citizens headed to the polls for the fifth multi-party elections in Tanzania on 25 October 2015. At first glance, Tanzania seems to be a country on a clear trajectory to prosperity – maintaining a GDP growth rate of around 7 percent. Despite this impressive macroeconomic growth, distribution of wealth has been inadequate and poverty levels remain high. So did these polls deliver anything different?
SAIIA Report No 17, August 2014 Download - English (642.1 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeThe Africa Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) is an initiative aimed at fostering good governance and development in its participating states. As part of its multi-pronged inquiry, it devotes a great deal of attention to investigating corporate governance on the continent. However, thus far corporate governance has attracted less attention than any other area of the APRM.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 188, June 2014
It is not surprising that African countries bordering the Indian Ocean see themselves as ‘gateways’ or entry points to the continent. The coastal towns and communities of South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique have for centuries had complex and dynamic cultural and economic links with their counterparts along the Indian Ocean Rim. Today, with the global liberalisation of trade and investment, these countries increasingly seek to position themselves between Africa’s interior and the broader world, and particularly the fast-growing economies in Asia.
As Malawi stands poised to assume the chairmanship of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) in August 2013, it does so amidst a fractious border dispute with Tanzania.
The upcoming summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the 17 and 18 August 2013 is an annual regional meeting that brings together 15 member states. SAIIA speaks to Aditi Lalbahadur who is researcher with SAIIA's South African Foreign Policy and African Drivers Programme.
United States President Barack Obama travels to three key African states for official working visits from 26 June to 3 July 2013. He is expected to arrive in South Africa on 27 June 2013 with meetings planned in Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town.
US-Africa relations have changed considerably over the past 20 years. A perceived limited American policy focused on providing ‘poor’ Africans with aid and selfishly dealing with its own security issues, such as access to oil and fighting terrorism, has now evolved into a partnership that is substantially more than just that. Today it is a relationship that is crucial for both entities. President Barack Obama’s upcoming Africa visit (26 June to 3 July 2013) is yet another testament of how far America is willing to go to prove it.
The nationalisation of resources has been the subject of heated debate in recent months, both within Africa and beyond. Abroad, the Canadian government’s recent refusal to accept a foreign buy-out of a locally-owned gas exploration company has raised eyebrows. At home, emotive exchanges over the possible nationalisation of the mining sector have dominated the public discourse in the run-up to Mangaung.
The SADC summit in Maputo, Mozambique, this week will consider approving the regional infrastructure development master plan. It aims to deal with the region’s deficit in road, rail, ports, power, communication and water infrastructure. The deficit is estimated to be about $100-billion.
Making Key Business Constraints in SADC Tangible: Experiences of the Private Sector Harare, Zimbabwe
The SADC Secretariat, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit – GIZ – and the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) would like to invite you to participate in the launch of a series of business case studies documenting theTOP 10 business constraints in SADC region in a tangible way.Johannesburg
An event co-hosted by SAIIA and ACODE, members of the Governance of Africa's Resources Research Network (GARN)Golf Course Hotel, Kampala, Uganda
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