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Nigeria (47)

President Jacob Zuma, accompanied by seven members of his executive and a dozen business leaders, undertook a high profile and widely commented state visit to Nigeria earlier this month. The visit, the first for President Zuma since President Muhamadu Buhari took power in peaceful and democratic elections in 2015, had been highly anticipated.
Wednesday, 27 May 2015

Special Focus on Nigeria

Following peaceful national elections in March, General Muhammadu Buhari will this week be inaugurated as Nigeria’s new president. On 29 May 2015 Africa’s largest economy and most populous nation will formally have a new leader.
History is likely to regard Nigeria's just-concluded election as the defining one that finally put the country on an irreversible course of democratic maturation.
Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation and officially its largest economy as of April 2014, is holding presidential and legislative elections on 28 March 2015, which bear in equal measure the hallmarks of continuity and potential ruptures.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 120, December 2014
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) is collaborating with the Centre for the Study of the Economies of Africa (CSEA) and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) to host this event that will explore Africa’s involvement in global economic governance.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 194, July 2014
Brazil 'is the country of the future and always will be'. Attributed to Stefan Zweig, an Austrian novelist who emigrated to Brazil in 1941, this quote could be adapted to Nigeria, which recently hosted the World Economic Forum’s (WEF’s) Africa Summit in Abuja.
On Sunday 6 April 2014 on the way to the SAIIA offices in Braamfontein I passed many Nigerian churches, which are now permanent features of inner-city Johannesburg. Sermons were already underway and sounded celebratory. I wondered if they were celebrating the announcement of Nigeria being named the continent’s largest economy, usurping South Africa.
In 2012, Africa lost an estimated $43-$46 billion to illicit financial flows (IFF). Calculated over time, the size of this “shadow financial system” is staggering. For instance, between 1980 and 2009 the continent is estimated to have lost around US$1.3 trillion. This is according to a report by Global Financial Integrity (GFI) and the African Development Bank (AfDB) released in May 2013.
From today, 6 May until Wednesday, 8 May 2013, South Africa will welcome Nigeria’s President Goodluck Jonathan for a state visit to the country. President Jonathan will formally meet his South African counterpart, President Jacob Zuma, at Tuynhuys in Cape Town on Tuesday, 7 May 2013.
Since the advent of democracy in South Africa in 1994, Pretoria’s relationship with Nigeria has been a mix of rivalry, tension and cooperation. The pattern of interaction has oscillated from President Mandela’s principled stance against General Sani Abacha’s dictatorship in the late 1990s, to close and effective engagement between Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Olusegun Obasanjo during the last decade. Under Presidents Jacob Zuma and Goodluck Jonathan, relations reached a low-point with the two continental powers unable to reach agreement on the chairmanship of the African Union Commission in 2012.
Volume 19, Issue 3 of SAIIA's peer-reviewed journal, the South African Journal of International Affairs, is now out, featuring articles from leading academics on a range of topics relevant to African interests.
The governance of Africa's natural resources continues to be a heatedly discussed topic. Alex Benkenstein, a senior researcher with SAIIA, speaks with leading researchers about their views on the key issues that need to be addressed to achieve effective governance of Africa’s natural resources. Watch the video [Duration: 8min 16sec] Download the podcast [Duration: 9min 41sec]
The bilateral relationship between South Africa and Nigeria is often described as cordial. Nonetheless, the relationship has also sometimes been poorly managed, as was illustrated earlier this year by the diplomatic spat over the deportations that occurred in March 2012. While the matter was resolved between the governments’ relevant departments, this instance of public acrimony begs the question whether it is symptomatic of deeper concerns existent in the bilateral relationship.
The World Bank needs a new president. Historically, he has been selected by the US president. This is unacceptable and must change. In fact, there is agreement that there should be a transparent and merit-based selection process. That the Europeans and their allies reneged on this commitment when they selected Christine Lagarde as the MD of the International Monetary Fund makes it even more important that the World Bank sets the precedent of how a transparent and merit-based selection process should work. Doing so will require the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, SA) and the other emerging market members…
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 103, December 2011
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 101, November 2011
A new book released by the South African Institute of International Affairs and published by Jacana Media examines the governance success stories of a number of African states. Entitled "African Solutions: Best Practices from the African Peer Review Mechanism", the book is the outcome of research into the policies, programmes and experiences identified as "best practices" from the first 12 countries that published Country Review Reports (CRRs) under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM). These countries are Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. The APRM was conceived as a voluntary mechanism…
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 96, October 2011
As published in The Sunday Independent, 10 October 2010 Nigerian taxis are known for their colourful writings that make personal and social statements. On my way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Nigeria’s independence last week, I was struck by one Lagosian vehicle that bore the popular Nigerian saying ‘no condition is permanent.’ It got me thinking about how the Nigerian condition has changed in 50 years. I also pondered how the emergence of South Africa as a key ally and rival since 1994 will affect the upcoming review of Nigeria’s foreign policy, the first since independence.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 65, July 2010
SAIIA Policy Briefing, No 20, July 2010
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Dr Nomfundo Xenia Ngwenya speaking on "Leaning towards Luanda and Abuja? South Africa´s evolving African liaisons" at The Centre for the Book, 62 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens, Cape Town on Thursday 29 July 2010 at 5:00 for 5:30 pm.
South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) & Ghana Center for Democratic Development (CDD) invite you to a conference on ‘Networking for Natural Resource Governance in Africa: Towards a Regional Approach’Venue: Alisa Hotel
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