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Mozambique (82)

Global and regional value chain theory and analysis has mushroomed in recent years. Theorists point out that over the past decades world trade has increasingly been characterised by the fracturing of manufacturing and production processes, with different goods and services produced in different geographical locations, ultimately forming part of a single commodity. Specialisation in certain component parts of the whole has become more important than being able to produce and entire product. Lead firms manage to source inputs from across the globe.
New books with contributions by our Senior Research Associate Prof Chris Alden shed light on growing security links between China and Africa; and Brazil-Mozambican ties in the area of development assistance:
This book critically investigates the expanding involvement of a leading emerging power, Brazil, in one of Africa’s fastest growing economies, Mozambique. It looks at the dynamics of Brazilian development assistance, its flagship engagement in Mozambique’s agricultural and resource sector and the burgeoning social ties that bind them together.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 237, October 2016
In Mozambique, interwovenness between political party, state and business has been a concern for a number of years. The crux of the issue lies with the overlapping of Mozambique’s ruling party, Frente de Libertação de Moçambique (FRELIMO), and the state.
On Monday 22 June 2015, SAIIA and Chatham House hosted the launch of a report by Alex Vines, Director for Area Studies and International Law, on 'Mozambique to 2018: Managers, Mediators, and Magnates'.
In last October's presidential and legislative election, the fifth round of democratic elections to be held in the country since they first took place in 1994, Mozambicans voted Filipe Nyusi of the governing FRELIMO party into power. The former defence minister will be inaugurated on Thursday 15 January 2015.
Sociologist Robert K Merton’s ‘Law of Unintended Consequences’ is the observable phenomenon of purposeful actions having unexpected results, most often negative ones. Mozambique’s 2014 elections have been characterised by continuing tensions between the Government of Mozambique and the Resistência Nacional Moçambicana (RENAMO) opposition political party, which the latter has sought to escalate in the post-election period, and ahead of the final results.[i]
SAIIA Report No 17, August 2014 Download - English (642.1 kB) Governance and APRM ProgrammeThe Africa Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) is an initiative aimed at fostering good governance and development in its participating states. As part of its multi-pronged inquiry, it devotes a great deal of attention to investigating corporate governance on the continent. However, thus far corporate governance has attracted less attention than any other area of the APRM.
On 15 October 2014 Mozambicans go to the polls to vote in the fifth round of democratic elections to be held in the country since they first took place in 1994. Twenty years after this watershed event, concerns about the sustainability of peace are more urgent than ever.
China’s rising position in African affairs, from that of quiescence to becoming a key economic actor on the continent, is now a well-recognized fact. A new book co-edited by SAIIA's Chris Alden and the IESE's Sérgio Chichava takes an in-depth look at China's relationship with Mozambique.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 173, February 2014
Despite the well-researched and recognised socio-economic and ecological values of mangroves worldwide, mangrove ecosystems are among the world’s most threatened vegetation types. More than half of all original forests have already been lost.
When Japan’s Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, led a business delegation to Mozambique in mid-January 2014, he also extended a loan package to the government of USD$672 million to support Mozambique in critical areas of infrastructure development, healthcare and education, and science and technology.
Mangroves are invaluable for fuel, fishing, climate change, disaster protection and tourism, but are rarely valued and protected appropriately. We spoke to Romy Chevallier, a researcher with SAIIA's Governance of Africa's Resources Programme who has recently been to Mozambique to conduct field research on mangroves, about this rare and misunderstood resource.
Fishing in Africa represents a significant source of income, particularly at the local community level. We spoke to SAIIA Senior Researcher, Alex Benkenstein, about the state of fisheries in Africa, and priorities for their management.
SAIIA Report No 14, November 2013  Download - English (1.13 MB) Governance of Africa's Resources ProgrammeDespite their well-researched and widely recognised socioeconomic and ecological value, mangroves are among the world’s most threatened vegetation types. More than a fifth of the world’s mangroves have been lost over the past 30 years alone, and many of the remaining forests are degraded. The depletion of mangroves in many developing countries in particular is a cause for serious environmental and economic concern.
Mozambique has been one of the ten fastest growing economies in the world from 2001-2010 and is forecast to continue its rapid growth trajectory. In 2014 Mozambique will commemorate 20 years of democracy and, given the substantial changes that have taken place in recent years, this provides a timely juncture to discuss emerging challenges and future perspectives on Mozambique, as well as the country’s role in the SADC region.
Mozambique is in a period of rapid transition. Since the end of civil war in 1992 sound governance, infrastructure investments and support from the donor community have helped to boost commerce and tourism. However, it is the recent discovery of significant reserves of gas and coal which has contributed most to Mozambique’s position as one of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world from 2001–10.
SAIIA Report No 13, August 2013 Download - English (1.63 MB) Governance of Africa's Resources ProgrammeMozambique is in a period of rapid transition. Since the end of civil war in 1992 sound governance, infrastructure investments and support from the donor community have helped to boost commerce and tourism. However, it is the recent discovery of significant reserves of gas and coal which has contributed most to Mozambique’s position as one of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world from 2001–10. Notwithstanding the high levels of investment and exceptional growth rates, the majority of Mozambicans remain highly dependent on natural ecosystems to…
It is not surprising that African countries bordering the Indian Ocean see themselves as ‘gateways’ or entry points to the continent. The coastal towns and communities of South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique have for centuries had complex and dynamic cultural and economic links with their counterparts along the Indian Ocean Rim. Today, with the global liberalisation of trade and investment, these countries increasingly seek to position themselves between Africa’s interior and the broader world, and particularly the fast-growing economies in Asia.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 151, August 2013
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 72, August 2013
On 13 July 2013 the fragility of regional security in Southern Africa came to the fore when the Southern African Development Community’s Ministerial Committee of the Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation met in Tanzania to discuss the worrying developments in Zimbabwe and Madagascar.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 68, June 2013
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