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European Union (89)

What many political and financial analysts viewed until a day before the British referendum on a European exit as scaremongering has come to be. The 72% voter turnout resulted in a 51.9% vote to leave the EU and a 48.1% vote in favour of remaining. While it essentially signals a split down the middle of UK voters, a closer look at the results reveals that the majority of voters in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the city of London supported the ‘remain’ vote, while the rest of England and Wales with a few small exceptions voted in favour of ‘leave’.
Who would have thought that the Brexit debate’s rising emotions would have reached their apogee in a horrific killing in the streets of a West Yorkshire town a week before the referendum that will determine the economic and global trajectory of Britain? The stakes are high, but it is equally clear that for all the expert opinions on the foolishness of an exit, many people may well vote with their hearts this Thursday, driven by a rhetoric that plays to bygone days of unmitigated national sovereignty and an imperial Britain that ‘ruled the waves’ and was at the centre of…
Looking back at the events of Europe’s migrant and refugee crisis in 2015, it is tempting to quote Dickens: ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’. Last summer, as large numbers of refugees, the majority fleeing Syria’s civil war, began to cross the Aegean Sea from Turkey to the Greek islands nestling near its shores, the European Union (EU) woke up to a refugee crisis on its own soil. The EU’s response, collectively and – more frequently – individually, was panicked, improvised and uncoordinated, driven by a mix of compassion and hostility.
SAIIA and the Delegation of the European Union to South Africa hosted a Panel Discussion on ‘The EU and South Africa in Dialogue: Working towards a more inclusive world'.
Three years of international research in Europe and the BICS countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) has resulted in a new book, 'Challenges of European External Energy Governance with Emerging Powers'. The chapter 'South Africa-EU energy governance: tales of path dependency, regional power, and decarbonisation' was authored by SAIIA Senior Researcher, Dr Agathe Maupin.
On Sunday 5 July 2015, more than 61 per cent of the Greek electorate voted 'No' to conditions of a financial rescue package. Greek leaders are returning to Brussels this week to argue for a more generous package, while the EU tries to assess the implications for Greece's euro-zone membership.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) will be hosting a Speaker’s Meeting to be addressed by Dr Andreas Dombret, Member of the Executive Board of the Deutsche Bundesbank, on 'Monetary Policy and Financial Regulation in Europe.'
At the recent University of the Witwatersrand’s Mandela Institute Conference on the Private Security Industry Regulatory Act Amendment Bill, commonly known as the Security Bill, National Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa provided the keynote address. From the various presentations at the Conference, held on 19 March 2015, it became apparent that there is a disconnect between South Africa’s national security imperatives and its trade and investment policy.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 8, March 2015
SAIIA's Western Cape Branch, the Head of the EU Delegation to the Republic of South Africa, Roeland van de Geer, and the Consul General of Britain in South Africa, Mr Christopher Trott, invite you to a public lecture to be addressed by Sir Emyr Jones Parry, on 'The UN and the EU: why their roles are so important for South Africa and the world.'
On 9 April 2014, His Excellency Ambassador Roeland van de Geer, Head of the European Union (EU) Delegation in Pretoria, addressed SAIIA members on 'Africa and the European Union: a partnership for the 21st century'. In an engaging discussion with the audience, the Ambassador covered issues such as the recent EU-Africa Summit, the history of South Africa-EU relations, the expansion of the EU, migration and immigration law, and the situation in Crimea.
Bulgaria is still the poorest European Union country, but its fortunes have improved exponentially since it joined the EU. This makes the recent events in the Crimean Peninsula unfortunate. By leaving Ukraine, Crimea has missed a window of opportunity to benefit from Ukraine’s closer association with the EU.
Representatives of 54 African and 28 European States, including over 30 heads of state, will meet in Brussels on 2 and 3 April for the fourth EU-Africa Summit. The meeting has a broad-ranging agenda under the title “Investing in People, Prosperity and Peace”.
The people of the Crimean peninsula in the Ukraine voted overwhelmingly to join the Russian Federation on 16 March 2014. The following day the Crimea declared its independence from the Ukraine as the Republic of Crimea and the Autonomous City of Sevastopol. And on 18 March 2014 the territories formally joined the Russian Federation through a treaty of accession.
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 85, March 2014
On New Year’s Eve 2014 over 100,000 Ukrainians attempted to set the Guinness World Record for the largest number of people simultaneously singing their national anthem. While such activities normally symbolise national unity, Ukraine remains as divided as ever. The former Soviet republic, independent since 1991 and with a population of 46 million, is faced with a choice of aligning itself closer to the European Union (EU) or Russia. The country’s unique geo-political location between the two actors makes it a highly desirable of area of influence for both.
Strategic bilateral trade relations and job creation topped the agenda at the 6th South Africa - European Union summit in Pretoria on 18 July 2013. The summit noted that over the last 10 years, EU investors accounted for three quarters of foreign direct investment and the block remained South Africa's biggest trading partner.
Volume 20, Issue 2 of SAIIA's peer-reviewed journal, the South African Journal of International Affairs, is now out, featuring articles from leading academics on a range of topics relevant to African interests.
South Africa and the European Union meet in Pretoria today  for the 6th annual SA-EU summit. While this meeting is another step in strengthening the strategic partnership between the two, SA’s Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies, said on Tuesday, that of particular importance this year are the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) negotiations between the EU and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP).
South Africa hosts the 6th South Africa (SA)- European Union (EU) Summit on 18 July 2013, symbolically, on former President Nelson Mandela's 95th birthday. At the end of the apartheid period, the Mandela administration began to negotiate the terms of the Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement (TDCA), and signed with the EU in 1999. This freed up trade between SA and the EU region with a planned phase-in over 12 years.
Since the dawn of democracy in South Africa, and the conclusion of the Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement (TDCA) in 1999, the relationship between South Africa and the European Union has grown incrementally to reach the level of a strategic partnership in 2007.
Event description: The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Mr Geert Laporte "How to revitalise Africa-EU relations in the run-up to the 2014 EU-Africa Summit?" atThe Mountain Club of SA, 97 Hatfield Street, Gardens, Cape Town on Thursday 21 February 2013 at 5:00 for 5:30 pm Light refreshments will be served before the event Please RSVP to saiia.admin@telkomsa.net or call Pippa on 083 305 2339 Entrance for non-members is R30 or R15 on presentation of acurrent student identity card. Parking is freely available on Hatfield Street.  …
Young Southern African professionals and their institutions were invited to Gauteng from 22 October to 2 November 2012, to participate in an intensive training programme designed to support the development of the Southern African Development Community (SADC).
The Fifth European Union (EU)-South Africa summit (17-18 September) takes place against a backdrop of heightened domestic and international turbulence. In the EU’s backyard, escalating tensions in North Africa and the Middle East, from the impasse in Syria to the rising anger among Muslims about a film insulting the Prophet, play themselves out in a European economic malaise that still has to resolve itself. In South Africa, the Marikana mine massacre, the spread of unrest to other mines, and the demagoguery employed as a tool for political gain, have placed this country on a knife’s edge in the run-up to…
The European Union (EU) is South Africa’s main trading partner, its principal investor and largest development partner. In 2007 South Africa became one of only ten countries globally - and the only African country - to have formed a Strategic Partnership (SP) with the EU, of which the fifth Summit is due to take place on 18-19 September 2012 in Brussels.
Since the early 2000s Turkey's foreign engagement has undergone profound changes. This has accompanied its growing economic strength at the very time when much of the developed world is in the midst of an economic crisis. Under the current foreign minister, Professor Ahmed Davuto?lu, Turkey has adopted a more assertive role in its region, but has also reached out beyond its immediate neighbourhood to Africa, Latin America and Asia, using all the soft power tools available to it. Turkey is a country to watch!
The on-going economic crisis facing the Eurozone does not only have potential ramifications for the single currency and the future trajectory of the European Union itself, but also for the rest of the world. Recent decisions by the eurozone members have increased international confidence in the ability of the Union to weather the storm.
On the eve of the first year anniversary of the Arab uprisings, it is useful to reflect on the state of EU-Africa relations, particularly in the aftermath of the prominent role played by key EU member states in Libya.
21 December 2011: The head of SAIIA's Economic Diplomacy Programme, Catherine Grant-Makokera, looks back at some of the major economic issues in 2011 from a South African and African perspective. She presents her perspective on European debt crisis, it's impact on European Union trade ties with Southern African states and where China fits into all of this. She also looks ahead and explains why regional integration in Africa will be a hot topic in 2012.
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