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Ethiopia (19)

Ethiopia, Africa’s second most populous country, and one of the 12 fastest growing economies in the world is heading to a general election on 24 May 2015. There is very little to suggest that the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), which came to power after a bloody civil war in 1991 should have much to worry about.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 198, August 2014
Travel in Africa can present serious challenges – especially if you are African. A few months ago I travelled to Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia and headquarters of the African Union. I have been traveling to this beautiful country about twice a year for the past decade. What struck me and prompted this reflection on African integration was noticing that in the past few years restrictions on entry have become increasingly harsher. One is tempted to ask questions about the dream of free movement of citizens across Africa – and therefore continental integration and unity.
Today, on 21 August 2013, a year has passed since the death of Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, the man considered to be the leading architect of post-Derg Ethiopia. Following his death, the future of a resurgent Ethiopia hung by a thread. Uncertainty mounted in the vast country of over 80 million inhabitants, with over 60 diverse ethnicities and two major religions that have cohabitated uncomfortably for decades.
In a new podcast, SAIIA interviewed participants of the “African Peer Review Mechanism +10: Reviewing a decade of Peer Learning and Projecting a Future of Governance in Africa” colloquium, which took place on 17 and 18 May 2013 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia -  As the leaders of the African Union gather in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to celebrate the continental organisation’s 50th anniversary, more than 46 civil society organisations deliberated on the present state of governance in Africa, by placing the continent’s premier governance mechanism, the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), under the microscope.  
Built in 1961 by the Ethiopian government, Africa Hall continues to stand today as a monument of African unity. A stained glass window in the lobby created by Ethiopia’s most well-known artist Afewerk Tekle depicts Africans of yesterday, today and tomorrow in their struggle for freedom and progress. It is in this hall that 32 Heads of State and Government of the newly independent states of Africa met on 25 May 1963 to sign the Organisation of African Unity Charter resulting in the formation of the Organisation African Unity (OAU).
The conference report is now available from the Civil Society Colloquium "The APRM +10: Reviewing a decade of Peer Learning and Projecting a Future of Governance in Africa", which took place 17-18 May 2013 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
The African Development Forum (ADF) is a biennial event hosted by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) in collaboration with the AU Commission, the African Development Bank, and other partners. The theme of the eighth ADF, concluded recently in Addis Ababa on 23-25 October 2012, was “Governing and Harnessing Natural Resources for Africa’s Development.” The forum focussed on key natural resource sectors on the continent, namely mining, forestry, fisheries and land.
When you walk the streets of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, it feels like the city is one large building site. Anyone with some money to invest is clearly putting it into property in this growing urban centre. Construction can be a good sign in a developing country. Not only does it provide employment in the short term but infrastructure development supports the growth of other economic sectors in the long-run. While some may argue that property is a safe bet in an uncertain economy, the boom in construction in Ethiopia is mainly driven by infrastructure development objectives.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 38, July 2009
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 37, June 2009
The rise of China as one of Africa's leading external partners is changing the character of the continent's traditional international relationships.  However, it is not only Africa that is being challenged by this engagement, but China's foreign policy is also undergoing a change as a result of this developing relationship.
Pretoria should think long and hard about exposing its young men and women to a dangerous situation in what may be a fruitless quest for stability, writes Tom Wheeler. THE United Nations Security Council voted unanimously on December 6 to establish a regional peacekeeping force for Somalia and to promote negotiations between conflicting elements in the country. Funding for the force was to be voluntary. In agreeing to a regional force and turning over responsibility for establishing the force to the African Union, the council took account of African sensitivities, which call for African solutions to African problems.