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Egypt (16)

SAIIA Occasional Paper No 221, September 2015
Sunday, 14 July 2013

Egypt's unrest

At the beginning of July, millions of Egyptians marched to demand that Egypt’s first democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi resign. He was overthrown by the military on 3 July 2013 and the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, Adly Mansour, was installed as interim president. Hazem el-Beblawi, a 76-year-old liberal economist became interim prime minister to govern under a temporary constitution until parliamentary elections could be held in the next six months.
Event description: The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Dr Boy Geldenhuys "Inside Syria and Egypt After the Arab Spring" atThe Mountain Club of SA, 97 Hatfield Street, Gardens, Cape Town on Thursday 7 February 2013 at 5:00 for 5:30 pm Light refreshments will be served before the event Entrance for non-members is R30 or R15 on presentation of a current student identity card.  Parking is freely available on Hatfield Street.   Event Background Dr Barend Leendert (Boy) Geldenhuys (D.Litt. et Phil: B.Th) studied at the universities…
An unexpected wave of popular protests broke on Africa's northern shores in 2011, starting with the political demise of the Tunisian and Egyptian presidents, leading to more deadly conflict in Libya. These events – particularly those in Libya – have divided the African Union (AU), and shaken the organisation's fragile new foundations of democracy promotion and conflict prevention.
The South African Institute of International Affairs, Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Dr Petrus de Kock speaking on 'Upheaval in the Nile Basin: a tour from Lake Albert, through Southern Sudan, to Cairo' at The Centre for the Book, 62 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens, Cape Town on Tuesday 7 June 2011 at 5:00 for 5:30 pm
As a new wave of democratisation breaks on Africa’s northern shores, the common goals of the Maghreb’s people are hitting up against starkly different types of state. The situation in Libya is different from Egypt and Tunisia is two respects. First, is the ruthless personality of Libya’s leader, Muammar Gaddafi.
As published by The New Age, 22 February 2011 For the past weeks the unfolding drama in the Middle East has dominated news reports and media commentary to exclusion of almost every other issue. And there is still no end in sight. As events reach a certain interim stage of resolution in one country, attention moves to another. Even as pundits attribute the problems in one country to a particular cause, the popular uprisings in another country seem to have a different cause.
While the world’s attention is focused on scenes of barricades in central Cairo, the political and media spotlight has finally come to illuminate the social crisis underlying the Arab worlds’ dictatorial regimes. In 2008, Queen Rania of Jordan warned that unemployed youth in the Arab world constitute a ‘ticking time bomb’ which, if not diffused, could lead to social unrest. She was correct, if events in Tunisia and Egypt are anything to go by.
As published by The New Age, 8 February 2011 The world media have been so focused on the story evolving in Egypt over the past two weeks that most missed the announcement of the name of the new President of the African Union. What were the leaders of Africa thinking about when they elected President Teodoro Obiang Nguema of Equatorial Guinea as incoming AU President?  We are told that a mechanical rotation of the presidency through the various regions of Africa is observed. It was Central Africa’s turn and the best the Central African region could come up with was…
As published in The New Age, 27 January 2011 Tunisia is not a country that until recently featured on the pages of South African newspapers, much less in screaming headlines. It is best known to the outside world as a Mediterranean beach resort for northern Europeans among the ruins of historic Carthage.
The South African Institute of International Affairs (Western Cape) invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Professor Geoff Brundrit on "The Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Great Harbour Cities of Africa - Alexandria, Lagos and Cape Town"
By Kurt Shillinger7 October 2005, Business DayTHE three suicide bombings on the Indonesian island of Bali last weekend, coming so soon after similar attacks in Britain and Egypt, underscore two critical and correlative points.
A recent survey by the South African Institute of International Affairs on the experience of South African companies and subsidiaries operating in Egypt found that most regard it as a promising market.
EGYPT faces the first contested presidential elections in its history next Wednesday. President Hosni Mubarak’s ruling party, the National Democratic Party (NDP), is poised to win. Mubarak’s liberalisation of the economy, the introduction of fiscal, monetary and institutional reforms, and the country’s relative political stability are his trump cards. For international and local investors this means a continuation of investment-friendly policies.