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Democratic Republic of Congo (61)

Global and regional value chain theory and analysis has mushroomed in recent years. Theorists point out that over the past decades world trade has increasingly been characterised by the fracturing of manufacturing and production processes, with different goods and services produced in different geographical locations, ultimately forming part of a single commodity. Specialisation in certain component parts of the whole has become more important than being able to produce and entire product. Lead firms manage to source inputs from across the globe.
The electoral commission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) this week announced that elections will be postponed until 2019. Elections originally scheduled for December 2016 were pushed back by a year in an agreement struck on 31 December 2016, to accommodate government concerns around an updated voters’ roll with the growing urgency of holding elections.
João Lourenço has become Angola’s first new president in 38 years. Dr Alex Vines of Chatham House explains why a stable DRC is a top priority for the new leader: A stable and predictable Congo is Luanda’s most important international objective.
The Southern African Development (SADC) heads of state met in Pretoria to discuss developments in the region, they will do so under new stewardship from Angola and South Africa. Angola will assume leadership of the Organ on Politics Defence and Security Cooperation (OPDSC), while South Africa assumes overall chairmanship.
In 2016, one of the defining terms when it came to the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) political situation was 'le glissement'. Meaning 'slippage', this word was popularly used to refer to President Joseph Kabila’s efforts to stay in office by repeatedly delaying elections The strategy worked. Kabila’s mandate officially ended in December 2016, yet he is still president and there are still no signs of an upcoming vote.
On 24 March, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued its first order awarding financial compensation – on an individual basis – to the victims of the Bogoro village attack in 2003 in the Ituri district of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The court sentenced Former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga in March 2014 to 12 years in prison (later reduced to eight years), on four counts of war crimes and one count of crimes against humanity for these atrocities. Breaking new ground, a symbolic compensation of $250 has been awarded to each of the 297 identified victims of those…
SAIIA Policy Insights No 39, December 2016
Monday, 12 December 2016

Shifting paradigms of aid

On 12 December, SAIIA and the Centre on International Cooperation (CIC) organised a one-day workshop at the Baha’i International Community’s United Nations Office in New York. The workshop looked at the role of emerging actors in conflict-affected countries.
The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is expected to go to the polls to elect a new leader to succeed President Joseph Kabila, whose mandate expires on 19 December. This should have happened towards the end of November but the DRC’s constitutional court recently approved a request by the electoral commission for a postponement. It is now widely expected that polling will take place in 2018.
The 2016 elections of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were scheduled for mid-September this year, and then postponed to 27 November. But the country is still nowhere near being ready to conduct a legitimate vote, and tensions there are reaching critical levels. What should South Africa be doing to help? 'Help'. That was the one-word message I received from my contact in the DRC. It was enough to tell me everything I needed to know.
South Africa has contributed billions of Rands in developmental assistance to the DRC. Yet according to traditional definitions of aid, these contributions do not count. In a new article published by the Mail and Guardian, SAIIA's Carmel Rawhani investigates the controversies around defining aid and why South Africa's contributions may actually surpass those of more wealthy ‘Western’ donors.
Tuesday, 30 August 2016

South Africa and the DRC

The South African Institute of International Affairs' (Saiia's) Senior Researcher Neissan Besharati speaks to Polity's Sashnee Moodley about our latest research: South Africa and the DRC – Evaluating a South-South partnership for peace, governance and development. Click here to read the related report Watch the video by clicking on the image above, or click here to view on the PolitySA YouTube Channel.
SAIIA's new report shows that South Africa’s contributions as a proportion of GDP greatly exceeds all other donors, demonstrating the significant role middle-income countries can play in global development.
President Jacob Zuma’s visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo on 16 October 2015 came at a critical time in the bilateral relations of the two countries, with South Africa having made significant investments in the DRC’s political process since the late 1990s.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 16, May 2015
SAIIA Policy Briefing No 109, October 2014
The overarching mandate of the Southern African Development Community is the furtherance of socio-economic cooperation and integration, including political and security cooperation among its fifteen member states. Ordinarily, it is with these in mind that the 33RD annual SADC Summit is convening in Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. The agenda of the summit is congested, and is clearly illustrative of the multitude challenges facing the regional body nineteen years since its transformation in 1994 from the Southern African Development Coordination Conference, which was founded in 1980.
Monday, 29 July 2013

Congo: the curse of riches

The Democratic Republic of Congo has witnessed another recent outbreak of violence related to the struggle over its rich natural resources. The central African country is faced with a dilemma which is frequently posed in Africa: Is there any way to turn the so-called ‘natural resource curse’ into a blessing?
The governance of Africa's natural resources continues to be a heatedly discussed topic. Alex Benkenstein, a senior researcher with SAIIA, speaks with leading researchers about their views on the key issues that need to be addressed to achieve effective governance of Africa’s natural resources. Watch the video [Duration: 8min 16sec] Download the podcast [Duration: 9min 41sec]
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 122, September 2012
‘Cui bono?’ or ‘Who benefits?’ is a question often asked by well-known political economist Susan Strange. This was also the guiding question of a recent SAIIA study on the tropical timber trade in Africa’s Great Lakes region. The report, entitled Timber Trade in Africa’s Great Lakes: The road from Beni, DRC to Kampala, Uganda focuses on international, regional and local demand-side drivers of tropical timber exports from the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to and through Uganda.
The SADC summit in Maputo, Mozambique, this week will consider approving the regional infrastructure development master plan. It aims to deal with the region’s deficit in road, rail, ports, power, communication and water infrastructure. The deficit is estimated to be about $100-billion.
SAIIA Report No 11, July 2012  Download - English [.pdf] (2.82 MB) Governance of Africa's Resource Programme The report provides a political economy analysis of the trade in tropical timber from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to and through Uganda via the Northern Transit Corridor. The study focuses on international, regional and local demand-side drivers for tropical timber exports from the eastern DRC to and through Uganda.
Making Key Business Constraints in SADC Tangible: Experiences of the Private Sector Harare, Zimbabwe
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