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Botswana (48)

Global and regional value chain theory and analysis has mushroomed in recent years. Theorists point out that over the past decades world trade has increasingly been characterised by the fracturing of manufacturing and production processes, with different goods and services produced in different geographical locations, ultimately forming part of a single commodity. Specialisation in certain component parts of the whole has become more important than being able to produce and entire product. Lead firms manage to source inputs from across the globe.
Join SAIIA researchers Romy Chevallier and Ross Harvey as they travel to Botswana to look at successful and sustainable opportunities linked to the country’s beautiful natural resources: its wildlife, parks and conservation areas.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 145, December 2015
SAIIA Research Report No 21, December 2015   Download - English (697.02 kB)  Governance of Africa’s Resources ProgrammeThis research report first considers the industrial policy debate on beneficiation and its context within the broader policy debate on the appropriate role of industrial policy.
SAIIA Policy Briefing 144, October 2015
Since independence, most African states have struggled to develop effective institutions that are responsive to the governance and development needs of their respective societies. This challenge is reflected not only in the prevalence of social and political strife in many African countries, but also in the poor socio-economic performance of the continent as a whole. The same could be said of the slow progress towards greater regional and continental integration, which, to a large extent is symptomatic of a weak institutional culture across the continent.
SAIIA Research Report No 20, August 2015  Download - English (3.08 MB) Governance of Africa's Resources ProgrammeBotswana is at a critical historical juncture. It has enjoyed a stable democracy since 1965 and strong, quality economic growth for the last few decades. However, the diamond revenues on which the country depends are likely to decline in the near future. Economic diversification is therefore a pressing policy concern.
Since shortly after independence, Botswana has depended on its diamond revenues. The diamond industry is inextricably linked to other industries, both upstream and downstream, that together provide much of the government's revenue. But these reserves are likely to decline in the near future.
Botswana possesses an estimated 212 billion tonnes of coal, much of which is thermal quality and unsuitable for export. Under a conservative set of assumptions, however, the country could export roughly 72 million tonnes a year at peak production. But climate change concerns - and the impact of international climate change agreements to limit carbon emissions - may curtail the availability of future export markets.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 4, November 2014
Understandably, the mining industry is not perceived as a bastion of environmental preservation. That many of the world’s minerals and hydrocarbons are found in pristine environments is an unfortunate but inescapable reality. Guinea’s tier-one iron-ore deposit, for instance, is under one of Africa’s last remaining rain forests.
In June 2014 Botswana’s Okavango Delta was enlisted as the 1000th UNESCO World Heritage Site – a status that underscores the Delta’s global ecological significance and highlights the need to protect and manage this important biosphere. September 2014 also marked the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Permanent Cubango-Okavango River Basin Commission (OKACOM) agreement that commits Namibia, Angola and Botswana, the three riparian states of the River Basin, to a coordinated and environmentally sustainable regional water governance strategy. In 1996 the Okavango Delta was also declared a Ramsar Site, further highlighting its status as a wetland of global importance.
The SADC summit in Maputo, Mozambique, this week will consider approving the regional infrastructure development master plan. It aims to deal with the region’s deficit in road, rail, ports, power, communication and water infrastructure. The deficit is estimated to be about $100-billion.
Making Key Business Constraints in SADC Tangible: Experiences of the Private Sector Harare, Zimbabwe
The SADC Secretariat, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit – GIZ – and the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) would like to invite you to participate in the launch of a series of business case studies documenting theTOP 10 business constraints in SADC region in a tangible way.Johannesburg
The SADC Secretariat, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit – GIZ – and the South African Institute for International Affairs (SAIIA) would like to invite you to participate in the launch of a series of business case studies documenting the TOP 10 business constraints in SADC region in a tangible way.Location: Gabarone
The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), Western Cape Branch, invites you to a public seminar to be addressed by Peter Draper speaking on "Trade and climate change - implications for Southern Africa?" at The Centre for the Book, 62 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens, Cape Town on Thursday 20 October 2011 at 5:00 for 5:30 pm.
Opposition parties are vital to the functioning of democracies as they provide a representative system of the electorate while keeping ruling parties accountable. Through this important legislative role, the political system gains legitimacy. However, opposition parties across the Southern African region confront many challenges in their attempt to function effectively, which often results in incumbent parties growing increasingly arrogant, centralising power, failing to distinguish between party and state interests and ignoring constructive criticism from the opposition and broader civil society. Against All Odds: Opposition Political Parties in Southern Africa is the latest publication from KMM Review Publishing Company in association…
SAIIA Research Report No 8, February 2011    Download - English [.pdf] (776.64 kB) This study examines the impact of the financial crisis and of G-20 reform on trade in financial services in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, focusing specifically on corporate, trade and project finance from the standpoint of the biggest banks in South Africa. The objective is to understand the effects, if any, on the SADC services negotiations, taking Botswana as a case study.
This workshop will consider the political economy of regional integration initiatives in Southern Africa, including what is driving the various processes (SACU, SADC and the Africa Free Trade Zone).  It will seek to deepen understanding of the factors that influence regional integration processes, such as the activities of the private sector, governance structures and the alignment with domestic priorities. Venue: Aluvi House, 2 Clyde Street, Murrayfield, Pretoria
Tuesday, 16 November 2010

Towards Cancun and Beyond

The South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to a Seminar on “Towards Cancun and Beyond" to be addressed by Mr Alf Wills, South Africa's Lead Climate Change Negotiator, and the launch of SAIIA's ground-breaking book, ‘Climate Change and Trade: The Challenges for Southern Africa’, edited by Peter Draper and Ivan Mbirimi. Date: Tuesday, 16 November 2010Time: Seminar 14:30 -17:00, followed by the book launch and receptionVenue: Jan Smuts House, East Campus, Wits University, Johannesburg
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 68, September 2010
The South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to the Workshop on Global Financial Reform and its effect on SACU Trade in Financial ServicesVenue: Jan Smuts House
Engineering News On June 29, the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) celebrated its centenary. In April, SACU heads of State held their first-ever summit under the theme ‘Implementing a common agenda towards regional integration in Southern Africa’. Tellingly, they plan to meet again this month to discuss “outstanding issues” concerning the organisation’s future. While Sacu may be 100 not out, it is not clear whether this is the end of a good innings or a portent double ton in the making.
SAIIA Occasional Paper, No 44, October 2009
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