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The fall of Robert Mugabe has dominated global coverage of Africa over the past few weeks. In Western coverage of the first week after the coup in Zimbabwe there was speculation about what China knew beforehand and whether Beijing played an active role in pushing for it.
The South African Institute of International Affairs cordially invites you to the book launch of China and Africa: Building Peace and Security on the Continent by Prof Chris Alden. Alden is an Associate Senior Research Fellow on South African Foreign Policy and China-Africa Relations at SAIIA and Professor in International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
New books with contributions by our Senior Research Associate Prof Chris Alden shed light on growing security links between China and Africa; and Brazil-Mozambican ties in the area of development assistance:
Drawing on leading and emerging scholars in the field, this book unpacks the complexity of security challenges confronting China and the continent. It also interrogates how security considerations impact upon the growing economic and social links China has developed with African states.
Has China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) usurped Brics as China’s flagship forum? And if so, what does this mean for future Brics co-operation? These are key questions leaders Michel Temer (Brazil), Vladimir Putin (Russia), Narendra Modi (India) and Jacob Zuma have had to consider at the meeting with their heads-of-state counterpart, China’s Xi Jinping, at the group’s annual summit in Xiamen, China.
It’s no exaggeration to say that African elephants are in grave danger. The forest elephant, native to Central Africa, is on the edge of extinction. Savanna elephants, in southern Africa, are being poached at a rate of roughly 27,000 a year.
Earlier this year, president Xi Jinping strode the world stage at Davos with his statement that 'We should commit ourselves to growing an open global economy… Pursuing protectionism is like locking oneself in a dark room.'
Today’s global political landscape is characterised by a number of disruptions to the status quo. A challenge to democracy revealed itself in the form of populism, as the Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s win attested. The threat of climate change, violent extremism and mass migration continues to shake Africa. In the midst of these developments, the 28th African Union (AU) Summit, held in Addis Ababa last month, on 30-31 January 2017, was markedly different to previous meetings.
If the first two months are anything to go by, 2017 will be an unusual year for Africa as two of its largest trading partners – China and America – are undergoing major political and economic transitions.
The Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi will be visiting five African countries this month namely Madagascar, Zambia, Tanzania, Republic of Congo and Nigeria. This would mark the Foreign Minister's first overseas destination.
China has published a notice that the processing and sale of ivory and ivory products 'will be stopped by December 31, 2017.' Following a decision taken at the latest Convention on International Trade in Endangered Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) conference to end all domestic trade in ivory, China has duly made a credible commitment to this end.
The commanding position that the BRICS economies once held in the post-global financial crises era legitimised their claims for more equitable global governance institutions. Equally, they believed that the development challenges they shared could be addressed through a collective voice in international forums on the back of their strong economic performances.
The integration of transport networks within Africa has long been a priority for the continent, for reasons of trade and political development. Last week, the dream to connect all major African cities through a high-speed railway network took a critical step forward with the signing of a five-year action plan between the African Union and China.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 35, September 2016
Three years of international research in Europe and the BICS countries (Brazil, India, China and South Africa) has resulted in a new book, 'Challenges of European External Energy Governance with Emerging Powers'. The chapter 'South Africa-EU energy governance: tales of path dependency, regional power, and decarbonisation' was authored by SAIIA Senior Researcher, Dr Agathe Maupin.
A webcast is available of the special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience,' held on 3 December 2015 by SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP).
On 3 December 2015, SAIIA and the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP) hosted a special workshop on 'China-Africa: a maturing relationship? Growth, change and resilience.'
The upcoming Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) summit in South Africa, the sixth gathering since 2000 and only the second to be held at heads of state level, comes at a time of unprecedented Chinese activism across the globe.
In the context of a ‘normalising’ Chinese economy, that seeks to move from a manufacturing-centred economy to one driven by consumption and services, there are obviously concerns about the impact on Africa through a decrease in commodity exports (and income) to China. Yet such shifts also signal opportunity and perhaps changes in China’s approach towards the continent, to include ‘softer’ issues - like closer public interaction.
Fifteen years after its inception, the sixth Forum on China Africa Co-operation (FOCAC) will be held in Johannesburg on December 4-5 under the theme, ‘Africa-China Progressing Together: Win-Win Cooperation for Common Development’. Launched in October 2000 in Beijing as a tri-annual collective dialogue platform for co-operation between China and Africa, FOCAC is a signal of the dynamic and expanding nature of China-Africa relations. 
SAIIA invites members of the media to our special briefing on the sixth Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), 'FOCAC VI : More of the same or signs of change?' on 19 November 2015.
SAIIA Occasional Paper No 223, October 2015
SAIIA Policy Insights No 29, November 2015
Chinese economic activities in Africa have gained increased visibility in parallel to the recent acceleration of Sino-African relations. But, as two case studies in a new paper illustrate, Chinese operations in Africa are not homogenous and engage with their respective host environments in dynamic ways.
SAIIA Policy Insights No 28, October 2015
In March 2015 a group of 25 prominent academics and development co-operation experts from the global South gathered in Midrand, South Africa to discuss a common analytical framework for South−South co-operation.
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